6 Works

Data from: The circular nature of recurrent life-cycle events: a test comparing tropical and temperate phenology

Vanessa Staggemeier, Maria Gabriela Gutierrez Camargo, José Alexandre Diniz-Filho, Robert Freckleton, Lucas Jardim & Patricia Morellato
1. The high diversity of plant species in the tropics has revealed complex phenological patterns and reproductive strategies occurring throughout the year. Describing and analysing tropical plant phenology, and detecting triggers, demands to consider the circular nature of recurrent life-cycle events and the use of appropriated statistical metrics. 2. Here we explore analytical pitfalls potentially affecting results of studies that do not consider the circular nature of phenology data when comparing resting and non-resting systems,...

Data from Soil chemistry turned upside down: a meta-analysis of invasive earthworm effects on soil chemical properties

Olga Ferlian, Madhav P. Thakur, Alejandra Castañeda González, Layla M. San Emeterio, Susanne Marr, Barbbara Da Silva Rocha & Nico Eisenhauer
Recent studies have shown that invasive earthworms can dramatically reduce native biodiversity, both above and below the ground. However, we still lack a synthetic understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind these changes, such as whether earthworm effects on soil chemical properties drive such relationships. Here, we investigated the effects of invasive earthworms on soil chemical properties (pH, water content, and the stocks and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) by conducting a meta-analysis. Invasive earthworms...

Data from: A macroecological approach to evolutionary rescue and adaptation to climate change

Jose Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho, Kelly S. Souza, Luis Mauricio Bini, Rafael Loyola, Ricardo Dobrovolski, Fabrício Rodrigues, Matheus De S. Lima-Ribeiro, Levi C. Terribile, Thiago F. Rangel, Igor Bione, Roniel Freitas, Ibere F. Machado, Tainá Rocha, Maria L. Lorini, Mariana M. Vale, Carlos A. Navas, Natan M. Maciel, Fabricio Villalobos, Miguel A. Olalla-Tárraga & Sidney Gouveia
Despite the widespread use of Ecological Niche Models (ENMs) for predicting the responses of species to climate change, these models do not explicitly incorporate any population-level mechanism. On the other hand, mechanistic models adding population processes (e.g., biotic interactions, dispersal and adaptive potential to abiotic constraints) are much more complex and difficult to parameterize, especially if the goal is to predict range shifts for many species simultaneously. In particular, the adaptive potential (based on genetic...

Color lures in orb-weaving spiders: a meta-analysis

Nathalia Ximenes, Vinicius Moraes, Jean Ortega & Felipe Gawryszewski
Lures are deceptive strategies that exploit sensory biases in prey, usually mimicking a prey’s mate or food item. Several predators exploit plant-pollinator systems, where visual signals are an essential part of interspecific interactions. Many diurnal, and even nocturnal, orb-web spiders present conspicuous body coloration or bright color patches. These bright colors are regarded as color-based lures that exploit biases present in insect visual systems, possibly mimicking flower colors. The prey attraction hypothesis was proposed more...

Data from: Canopy height explains species richness in the largest clade of Neotropical lianas

Leila Meyer, José Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho, Lúcia G. Lohmann, Joaquín Hortal, Elisa Barreto, Thiago Rangel & W. Daniel Kissling
Aim: Tall and structurally complex forests can provide ample habitat and niche space for climbing plants, supporting high liana species richness. We test to what extent canopy height (as proxy of 3D habitat structure), climate and soil interact to determine species richness in the largest clade of Neotropical lianas. We expect that the effect of canopy height on species richness is higher for lianas from closed tropical rainforests compared to riparian and savanna habitats. Location:...

Data from: Biological traits, phylogeny and human footprint signatures on the geographic range size of passerines (Order Passeriformes) worldwide

Miguel Ángel Olalla-Tárraga, Talita Amado, Luis Mauricio Bini, Pablo Martínez, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, Erik Joaquin Torres-Romero & Fabricio Villalobos
Aim Multiple hypotheses exist to explain the astonishing geographic range size variation across species, but these have rarely been tested under a unifying framework that simultaneously considers direct and indirect effects of ecological niche processes and evolutionary dynamics. Here, we jointly evaluate ecological and evolutionary hypotheses that may account for global interspecific patterns of range size in the most species-rich avian order: Passeriformes (perching birds). Location Global Time period CurrentMajor taxa studied Order Passeriformes Methods...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    6
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • Colegio de Postgraduados
    1
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    1
  • Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
    1
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Sergipe
    1
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    1
  • University of Brasília
    1