7 Works

Data from: ABC inference of multi-population divergence with admixture from unphased population genomic data

John D. Robinson, Lynsey Bunnefeld, Jack Hearn, Graham N. Stone & Michael J. Hickerson
Rapidly developing sequencing technologies and declining costs have made it possible to collect genome-scale data from population-level samples in non-model systems. Inferential tools for historical demography given these datasets are, at present, underdeveloped. In particular, approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) has yet to be widely embraced by researchers generating these data. Here, we demonstrate the promise of ABC for analysis of the large datasets that are now attainable from non-model taxa through current genomic sequencing technologies....

Data from: Considering gene flow when using coalescent methods to delimit lineages of North American pitvipers of the genus Agkistrodon

Frank T. Burbrink & Timothy J. Guiher
Examining species diversity and mechanisms of speciation using coalescent models provides a framework for how regional diversity is accrued, even in well-studied areas such as the Nearctic. It is likely, that gene flow among closely-related species with adjacent distributions may be common. However, the absence of gene flow is a primary assumption of many phylogeographical methods that produce species trees and delimit species using Bayesian or likelihood functions in a coalescent framework. In the present...

Data from: Transcriptome resources for the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus): new genomic tools for investigating ecologically divergent urban and rural populations

Stephen E. Harris, Rachel J. O'Neill & Jason Munshi-South
Genomic resources are important and attainable for examining evolutionary change in divergent natural populations of non-model species. We utilized two Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platforms, 454 and SOLiD 5500XL, to assemble low coverage transcriptomes of the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a widespread and abundant native rodent in eastern North America. We sequenced liver mRNA transcripts from multiple individuals collected from urban populations in New York City and rural populations in undisturbed protected areas nearby and...

Data from: Bioclimatic variables derived from remote sensing: assessment and application for species distribution modeling

Eric Waltari, Ronny Schroeder, Kyle McDonald, Robert P. Anderson & Ana Carnaval
Remote sensing techniques offer an opportunity to improve biodiversity modeling and prediction worldwide. Yet, to date, the weather-station based WorldClim dataset has been the primary source of temperature and precipitation information used in correlative species distribution models. WorldClim consists of grids interpolated from in situ station data recorded primarily from 1960 to 1990. Those datasets suffer from uneven geographic coverage, with many areas of Earth poorly represented. Here, we compare two remote sensing data sources...

Data from: From refugia to rookeries: phylogeography of Atlantic green turtles

Eugenia Naro-Maciel, Brendan N. Reid, S. Elizabeth Alter, George Amato, Karen A. Bjorndal, Alan B. Bolten, Meredith Martin, Campbell J. Nairn, Brian Shamblin & Oscar Pineda-Catalan
Investigating species’ distribution and abundance over time is central to evolutionary biology, and provides important context for conservation and management. With respect to population genetic structure in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas), certain processes such as female philopatry to natal rookeries are well understood, while others, such as male philopatry and historical changes in distribution and abundance, remain relatively understudied. Further, although inferences from mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellites have both been critical in identifying...

Data from: Climate change will increase savannas at the expense of forests and treeless vegetation in tropical and subtropical Americas

José D. Anadon, Osvaldo E. Sala & Fernando T. Maestre
1. Transition areas between biomes are particularly sensitive to environmental changes. Our understanding of the impacts of ongoing climate change on terrestrial ecosystems has significantly increased during the last years. However, it is largely unknown how climatic change will affect transitions among major vegetation types. 2. We modelled the distribution of three alternative states (forest, savanna and treeless areas) in the tropical and subtropical Americas by means of climate-niche modelling. We studied how such distribution...

Data from: Population genomics reveals seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) of the western mid-Atlantic coast to be residents rather than vagrants

J.T. Boehm, John Waldman, John D. Robinson, Michael J. Hickerson & J. T. Boehm
Understanding population structure and areas of demographic persistence and transients is critical for effective species management. However, direct observational evidence to address the geographic scale and delineation of ephemeral or persistent populations for many marine fishes is limited. The Lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) can be commonly found in three western Atlantic zoogeographic provinces, though inhabitants of the temperate northern Virginia Province are often considered tropical vagrants that only arrive during warm seasons from the southern...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • City University of New York
    7
  • Queens College, CUNY
    6
  • American Museum of Natural History
    4
  • University of Hohenheim
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • City College of New York
    1
  • New York University
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • King Juan Carlos University
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1