13 Works

Data from: Ornament size and colour as alternative strategies for effective communication in gliding lizards

Danielle A. Klomp, Terry Ord, Indraneil Das, Arvin Diesmos, Norhayati Ahmad, Devi Stuart-Fox & T. J. Ord
Sexual ornamentation needs to be conspicuous to be effective in attracting potential mates and defending territories and indeed, a multitude of ways exists to achieve this. Two principal mechanisms for increasing conspicuousness are to increase the ornament's colour or brightness contrast against the background and to increase the size of the ornament. We assessed the relationship between the colour and size of the dewlap, a large extendible throat-fan, across a range of species of gliding...

Data from: Mosaicism in a new Eocene pufferfish highlights rapid morphological innovation near the origin of crown tetraodontiforms

Roger A. Close, Zerina Johanson, James C. Tyler, Richard C. Harrington & Matt Friedman
Tetraodontiformes (pufferfishes and kin) is a taxonomically and structurally diverse, widely-distributed clade of acanthomorphs, whose members often serve as models for genomics and, increasingly, macroevolutionary studies. Morphologically disparate Palaeogene fossils suggest considerable early experimentation, but these flattened specimens often preserve limited information. We present a three-dimensionally preserved beaked tetraodontiform from the early Eocene (c. 53 Ma) London Clay Formation, UK. Approximately coeval with the oldest crown tetraodontiforms, †Ctenoplectus williamsi gen. et sp. nov. presents an...

Data from: Tropical ancient DNA reveals relationships of the extinct Bahamian giant tortoise Chelonoidis alburyorum

Christian Kehlmaier, Axel Barlow, Alexander K. Hastings, Melita Vamberger, Johanna L. A. Paijmans, David W. Steadman, Nancy A. Albury, Richard Franz, Michael Hofreiter & Uwe Fritz
Ancient DNA of extinct species from the Pleistocene and Holocene has provided valuable evolutionary insights. However, these are largely restricted to mammals and high latitudes because DNA preservation in warm climates is typically poor. In the tropics and subtropics, non-avian reptiles constitute a significant part of the fauna and little is known about the genetics of the many extinct reptiles from tropical islands. We have reconstructed the near-complete mitochondrial genome of an extinct giant tortoise...

Data from: Egg morphology fails to identify nests parasitized by conspecifics in common pochard: a test based on protein fingerprinting and including female relatedness

Adéla Petrželková, Hannu Pöysä, Petr Klvaňa, Tomáš Albrecht & David Hořák
Conspecific brood parasites lay eggs in nests of other females of the same species. A variety of methods have been developed and used to detect conspecific brood parasitism (CBP). Traditional methods may be inaccurate in detecting CBP and in revealing its true frequency. On the other hand more accurate molecular methods are expensive and time consuming. Eadie developed a method for revealing CBP based on differences in egg morphology. That method is based on Euclidean...

Data from: Genomic analysis reveals hidden biodiversity within colugos, the sister group to primates

Victor C. Mason, Gang Li, Patrick Minx, Jurgen Schmitz, Gennady Churakov, Liliya Doronina, Amanda D. Melin, Nathaniel J. Dominy, Norman T-L. Lim, Mark S. Springer, Richard K. Wilson, Wesley C. Warren, Kristofer M. Helgen & William J. Murphy
Colugos are one of the most poorly studied mammals despite their centrality to resolving supraordinal primate relationships. Two described species of these gliding mammals are the sole living members of the order Dermoptera, distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We generated a draft genome sequence for a Sunda colugo and a Philippine colugo reference alignment, and used these to identify colugo-specific genetic changes that were enriched in sensory and musculo-skeletal related genes that likely underlie their nocturnal...

Data from: Enemy at the gates: rapid defensive trait diversification in an adaptive radiation of lizards

Chris Broeckhoven, Genevieve Diedericks, Cang Hui, Buyisile G. Makhubo & Pieter Le Fras Nortier Mouton
Adaptive radiation, the product of rapid diversification of an ancestral species into novel adaptive zones, has become pivotal in our understanding of biodiversity. While it has widely been accepted that predators may drive the process of adaptive radiation by creating ecological opportunity (e.g. enemy-free space), the role of predators as selective agents in defensive trait diversification remains controversial. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we provide evidence for an ‘early burst’ in the diversification of antipredator phenotypes...

Data from: At least some meiofaunal species are not everywhere. Indication of geographic, ecological and geological barriers affecting the dispersion of species of Ototyphlonemertes (Nemertea, Hoplonemertea)

Francesca Leasi, S.C. Andrade & Jon Norenburg
Most meiofaunal species are known to have a broad distribution with no apparent barriers to their dispersion. However, different morphological and/or molecular methods supported patterns of diversity and distribution that may be different among taxa while also conflicting within the same group. We accurately assessed the patterns of geographic distribution in actual genetic species of a marine meiofaunal animal model: Ototyphlonemertes. Specimens were collected from several sites around Europe, Northern and Central America, Southern America,...

Data from: Tree circumference dynamics in four forests characterized using automated dendrometer bands

Valentine Herrmann, Sean M. McMahon, Matteo Detto, James A. Lutz, Stuart J. Davies, Chia-Hao Chang-Yang & Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira
Stem diameter is one of the most commonly measured attributes of trees, forming the foundation of forest censuses and monitoring. Changes in tree stem circumference include both irreversible woody stem growth and reversible circumference changes related to water status, yet these fine-scale dynamics are rarely leveraged to understand forest ecophysiology and typically ignored in plot- or stand-scale estimates of tree growth and forest productivity. Here, we deployed automated dendrometer bands on 12–40 trees at four...

Data from: Endemic species may have complex histories: within-refugium phylogeography of an endangered Iberian vole

Soraia Barbosa, Joana Paupério, Jeremy S. Herman, Clara M. Ferreira, Ricardo Pita, Hélia M. Vale-Gonçalves, João A. Cabral, José A. Garrido-García, Ramón C. Soriguer, Pedro Beja, António Mira, Paulo C. Alves & Jeremy B. Searle
Glacial refugia protected and promoted biodiversity during the Pleistocene, not only at a broader scale, but also for many endemics that contracted and expanded their ranges within refugial areas. Understanding the evolutionary history of refugial endemics is especially important in the case of endangered species to recognise the origins of their genetic structure and thus produce better informed conservation practices. The Iberian Peninsula is an important European glacial refugium, rich in endemics of conservation concern,...

Data from: Does hunting or hiking affect wildlife communities in protected areas?

Roland Kays, Arielle W. Parsons, Megan C. Baker, Ellizabeth L. Kalies, Tavis Forrester, Robert Costello, Christopher T. Rota, Joshua J. Millspaugh & William J. McShea
Managed public wild areas have dual mandates to protect biodiversity and provide recreational opportunities for people. These goals could be at odds if recreation, ranging from hiking to legal hunting, disrupts wildlife enough to alter their space use or community structure. We evaluated the effect of managed hunting and recreation on 12 terrestrial wildlife species by employing a large citizen science camera trapping survey at 1947 sites stratified across different levels of human activities in...

Data from: Cenozoic dynamics of shallow-marine biodiversity in the Western Pacific

Moriaki Yasuhara, Hokuto Iwatani, Gene Hunt, Hisayo Okahashi, Tomoki Kase, Hiroki Hayashi, Toshiaki Irizuki, Yolanda M. Aguilar, Allan Gil S. Fernando & Willem Renema
Aim: Cenozoic dynamics of large-scale species diversity patterns remain poorly understood, especially for the Western Pacific, in part, because of the paucity of well-dated fossil records from the tropics. This article aims to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of species diversity in the Western Pacific through the Cenozoic, focusing on the tropical Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) biodiversity hotspot. Location: Tropical and north-western Pacific Ocean. Methods: We analysed well-preserved fossil ostracodes from the tropical Western Pacific and combined...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: Archipelago-wide survey of Philippine forest dragons (Agamidae: Gonocephalus): multilocus phylogeny uncovers unprecedented levels of genetic diversity in a biodiversity hotspot

Luke J. Welton, Cameron D. Siler, L. L. Grismer, Arvin C. Diesmos, Jack W. Sites & Rafe M. Brown
We utilize robust geographical genetic sampling, a multilocus dataset, and coalescent-based species delimitation statistics to provide the first phylogenetic inferences of relationships of Philippine Gonocephalus, combined with estimates of putative species diversity in this virtually unknown island radiation. Our results reveal startling levels of undocumented diversity, genetically partitioned at a number of geographic levels across the archipelago. In this paper we present the first survey of genetic lineage diversity, coupled with an archipelago-wide elucidation of...

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  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
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  • Universidad De Panama
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  • National University of Malaysia
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  • Antiquities, Monuments and Museum Corporation
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  • National Museum of Natural History
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  • University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
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  • Utah State University
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