9 Works

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of Terniopsis (Podostemaceae) and contrasting molecular and morphological variations in two species

Satoshi Koi, Hyosig Won, Hùng Trần, La-Aw Ampornpan & Masahiro Kato
Podostemaceae show different patterns of morphological variation relative to molecular ones between genera and between species, but additional material was necessary to make the patterns clearer. Using new material collected from Cambodia, we compared the variations of Terniopsis chanthaburiensis and T. heterostaminata in Cambodia, Laos and Thailand, and conducted matK phylogenetic analysis with many samples and most species of the genus. In contrast to the narrow molecular variation, the morphological variation (e.g., in the length...

Data from: Nest survival in year-round breeding tropical Red-capped Larks (Calandrella cinerea) increases with higher nest abundance but decreases with higher invertebrate availability and rainfall

Joseph Mwangi, Henry K. Ndithia, Rosemarie Kentie, Muchane Muchai & B. Irene Tieleman
Nest survival is critical to breeding in birds and plays an important role in life-history evolution and population dynamics. Studies evaluating the proximate factors involved in explaining nest survival and the resulting temporal patterns are biased in favor of temperate regions. Yet, such studies are especially pertinent to the tropics, where nest predation rates are typically high and environmental conditions often allow for year-round breeding. To tease apart the effects of calendar month and year,...

Data from: Distinguishing the victim from the threat: SNP‐based methods reveal the extent of introgressive hybridization between wildcats and domestic cats in Scotland and inform future in situ and ex situ management options for species restoration

Helen V. Senn, Muhammad Ghazali, Jennifer Kaden, David Barcaly, Ben Harrower, Ruairidh D. Campbell, David W. MacDonald, Andrew C. Kitchener & David Barclay
The degree of introgressive hybridisation between the Scottish wildcat and domestic cat has long been suspected to be advanced. Here we use a 35-SNP-marker test, designed to assess hybridisation between wildcat and domestic cat populations in Scotland, to assess a database of 265 wild-living and captive cat samples, and test the assumptions of the test using 3097 SNP markers generated independently in a subset of the data using ddRAD. We discovered that despite increased genetic...

Data from: Morphology of the petrosal and stapes of Borealestes (Mammaliaformes, Docodonta) from the Middle Jurassic of Skye, Scotland

Elsa Panciroli, Julia A. Schultz & Zhe-Xi Luo
\We describe, in unprecedented detail, the petrosals and stapes of the docodont Borealestes from the Middle Jurassic of Scotland, using high resolution μCT and phase‐contrast synchrotron imaging. We describe the inner ear endocast and the vascularized interior structure of the petrosal, and provide the first endocranial view of a docodontan petrosal. Our study confirms some similarities in petrosal and stapedial morphology with the better known Haldanodon of the Late Jurassic of Portugal, including: (1) the...

Data from: Dark pigmentation limits thermal niche position in birds

Ismael Galván, Sol Rodríguez-Martínez & Luis M. Carrascal
1. Animal pigmentation has evolved because of several adaptive functions. In the case of pigmentation produced by melanins, the most common pigments in animals, the main function is protection against UV radiation. However, pigmentation also affects animal surface's ability to absorb solar radiation and gain heat, which may represent a thermal constraint for endotherms due to their relatively high and constant body temperatures. 2. As darker colours absorb more radiation than lighter colours, dark-pigmented endotherm...

Data from: High specialization and limited structural change in plant‐herbivore networks along a successional chronosequence in tropical montane forest

Conor M. Redmond, John Auga, Bradley Gewa, Simon T. Segar, Scott E. Miller, Kenneth Molem, George D. Weiblen, Phillip T. Butterill, Gibson Maiyah, Amelia S.C. Hood, Martin Volf, Leonardo R. Jorge, Yves Basset, Vojtech Novotny, Philip T. Butterill & Amelia S. C. Hood
Secondary succession is well‐understood, to the point of being predictable for plant communities, but the successional changes in plant‐herbivore interactions remains poorly explored. This is particularly true for tropical forests, despite the increasing importance of early successional stages in tropical landscapes. Deriving expectations from successional theory, we examine properties of plant‐herbivore interaction networks while accounting for host phylogenetic structure along a succession chronosequence in montane rainforest in Papua New Guinea. We present one of the...

Data from: Oligocene–Neogene fossil history of Asian endemic conifer genera in Japan and Korea

Atsushi Yabe, Eunkyoung Jeong, Kyungsik Kim & Kazuhiko Uemura
Temporal and spatial changes of ten conifer genera that are endemic to East Asia were analyzed based on fossil data from humid temperate forests in the Japanese Islands and Korean Peninsula to elucidate the phytogeographic history, and to understand differences between those genera eliminated from the Japanese Islands and those remained extant. All these genera, except for Thujopsis, have existed in the area since the Paleogene and remained in the Japanese islands after initial separation...

Data from: Synchronized shift of oral, fecal and urinary microbiotas in bats and natural infection dynamics during seasonal reproduction

Muriel Dietrich, Teresa Kearney, Ernest C.J. Seamark, Janusz T. Paweska & Wanda Markotter
Seasonal reproduction is a period of extreme physiological and behavioral changes, yet we know little about how it may affect host microbial communities (i.e. microbiota) and pathogen transmission. Here, we investigated shifts of the bacterial microbiota in saliva, urine and faeces during the seasonal reproduction of bats in South Africa, and test for an interaction in shedding patterns of both bacterial (Leptospira) and viral (adeno- and herpes-viruses) agents. Based on a comparative approach in two...

Data from: Phylotranscriptomic analysis and genome evolution of the Cypripedioideae (Orchidaceae)

Sarah A. Unruh, Michael R. McKain, Yung-I Lee, Tomohisa Yukawa, Melissa K. McCormick, Richard P. Shefferson, Ann Smithson, James H. Leebens-Mack & J. Chris Pires
Premise of Study: The slipper orchids (Cypripedioideae) are a morphologically distinct subfamily of Orchidaceae. They also have some of the largest genomes in the orchids, which may be due to polyploidy or some other mechanism of genome evolution. We generated ten transcriptomes and incorporated existing RNA-seq data to infer a multi-locus nuclear phylogeny of the Cypripedioideae and to determine if a whole genome duplication event (WGD) correlated to the large genome size of this subfamily....

Registration Year

  • 2018
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • National Museum
    9
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • National Museum of Nature and Science
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • National Museums Scotland
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • National Museum of Natural Science
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1