8 Works

Data from: Citizen science program shows urban areas have lower occurrence of frog species, but not accelerated declines

Martin J. Westgate, Ben C. Scheele, Karen Ikin, Anke Maria Hoefer, R. Matthew Beaty, Murray Evans, Will Osborne, David Hunter, Laura Rayner & Don A. Driscoll
Understanding the influence of landscape change on animal populations is critical to inform biodiversity conservation efforts. A particularly important goal is to understand how urban density affects the persistence of animal populations through time, and how these impacts can be mediated by habitat provision; but data on this question are limited for some taxa. Here, we use data from a citizen science monitoring program to investigate the effect of urbanization on patterns of frog species...

Data from: Whole-chloroplast analysis as an approach for fine-tuning the preservation of a highly charismatic but critically endangered species, Wollemia nobilis (Araucariaceae)

Abigail Greenfield, Hannah McPherson, Tony Auld, Sven Delaney, Catherine A. Offord, Marlien Van Der Merwe, Jia-Yee S. Yap & Maurizio Rossetto
The critically endangered Wollemia nobilis W.G. Jones, K.D. Hill & J.M. Allen is endemic to Wollemi National Park north of Sydney (Australia). All known wild individuals are restricted to four sites in a single canyon system. W. nobilis can reproduce sexually but at all sites individual clumps can be multi-stemmed from a common base. In the first genetic study of this species, no genetic variation was found across multiple genetic marker types representing hundreds of...

Data from: Developing state and transition models of floodplain vegetation dynamics as a tool for conservation decision-making: a case study of the Macquarie Marshes Ramsar wetland

Gilad Bino, Scott A. Sisson, Richard T. Kingsford, Rachael F. Thomas & Sharon Bowen
1. Floodplain vegetation states (communities) exhibit spatiotemporal dynamics in vegetation structure and composition, which reflect unique hydrological and connectivity patterns. Shifts in inundation regimes can drive succession and establish new stable states, determined by the magnitude and duration of the hydrological perturbation. 2. We aimed to develop a modelling approach that is able to capture ecosystem dynamics, identify and quantify the main drivers of change, and provide a tool for conservation decision-making. We developed state...

Data from: Survival, gene and metabolite responses of Litoria verreauxii alpina frogs to fungal disease chytridiomycosis

Laura Grogan, Jason Mulvenna, Joel P. A. Gummer, Benjamin C. Scheele, Lee Berger, Scott D. Cashins, Michael S. McFadden, Peter Harlow, David A. Hunter, Robert D. Trengove & Lee F. Skerratt
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN ANOTHER PUBLICATION. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14493. The fungal skin disease chytridiomycosis has caused the devastating decline and extinction of hundreds of amphibian species globally, yet the potential for evolving resistance, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We exposed 406 naïve, captive-raised alpine tree frogs (Litoria verreauxii alpina) from multiple populations (one evolutionarily naïve to chytridiomycosis) to the aetiological agent Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in two concurrent and...

Data from: Integrating local knowledge and research to refine the management of an invasive non-native grass in critically endangered grassy woodlands

Jennifer Firn, Emma Ladouceur & Josh Dorrough
1. Globally the prevalence and impact of invasive non-native plant species is increasing rapidly. Experimentally-based research aimed at supporting management is limited in its ability to keep up with this pace, partly because of the importance of understanding historical abiotic and biotic conditions. Contrastingly, landholders are in unique positions to witness species turnover in grasslands, adapt management practices in response, and learn from successes and failures. 2. This local knowledge could be crucial for identifying...

Data from: Do grazing intensity and herbivore type affect soil health? Insights from a semi-arid productivity gradient

David J. Eldridge, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, Samantha K. Travers, James Val, Ian Oliver & David Eldridge
Grazing is one of the most widespread forms of intensive management on Earth and is linked to reductions in soil health. However, little is known about the relative influence of herbivore type, herbivore intensity and site productivity on soil health. This lack of knowledge reduces our capacity to manage landscapes where grazing is a major land use. We used structural equation modelling to assess the effects of recent (cattle, sheep, goats, kangaroos and rabbit dung)...

Data from: Livestock grazing reinforces the competitive exclusion of small-bodied birds by large aggressive birds

James Val, David J. Eldridge, Samantha K. Travers & Ian Oliver
1.Grazing by domestic livestock is sometimes promoted as a management tool to benefit biodiversity. In many situations, however, it can produce negative outcomes. 2.Here we examine the impacts of recent and historic livestock grazing on bird communities in the semi-arid woodlands in eastern Australia, testing the notion that grazing removes the suppressive effect of structurally complex vegetation on miners, thereby reducing the richness and abundance of small birds. 3.We used time- and area-limited searches of...

Surface indicators are correlated with soil multifunctionality in global drylands

David Eldridge, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, José Luis Quero, Victoria Ochoa, Beatriz Gonzalo, Pablo García-Palacios, Cristina Escolar, Miguel Garcia-Gomez, Laura Beinticinco, Matthew Bowker, Donaldo Bran, Ignacio Castro, Alex Cea, Mchich Derak, Carlos Ivan Espinosa, Adriana Fronertino, Juan Gaitán, Gabriel Gatica, Susana Gómez-González, Wahida Ghiloufi, Julio Gutierrez, Elizabeth Gusmán-M., Rosa Hernandez, Frederic Hughes, Walter Muiño … & Fernando Maestre
1. Multiple ecosystem functions need to be considered simultaneously to manage and protect the many ecosystem services that are essential to people and their environments. Despite this, cost effective, tangible, relatively simple, and globally-relevant methodologies to monitor in situ soil multifunctionality, i.e. the provision of multiple ecosystem functions by soils, have not been tested at the global scale. 2. We combined correlation analysis and structural equation modelling to explore whether we could find easily measured,...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    1
  • 2018
    1
  • 2017
    2
  • 2016
    2
  • 2015
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • NSW Office of Environment & Heritage
    8
  • UNSW Sydney
    5
  • University of New England
    2
  • Haut-Commissariat aux Eaux et Forêts et à la Lutte Contre la Désertification
    1
  • QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute
    1
  • Murdoch University
    1
  • University of Pavia
    1
  • Grupo Español de Investigación en Neurooncología
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • University of La Serena
    1