18 Works

Data from: Evolutionary and demographic history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex: an integrative approach

Joaquin Ortego, Victor Noguerales, Paul F. Gugger & Victoria L. Sork
Understanding the factors promoting species formation is a major task in evolutionary research. Here, we employ an integrative approach to study the evolutionary history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex (genus Quercus). To infer the relative importance of geographical isolation and ecological divergence in driving the speciation process, we (i) analyzed inter- and intra-specific patterns of genetic differentiation and employed an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework to evaluate different plausible scenarios of species...

Data from: Variation in seed dispersal effectiveness: the redundancy of consequences in diversified tropical frugivore assemblages

Débora C. Rother, Marco A. Pizo & Pedro Jordano
Plant–frugivore mutualistic assemblages frequently combine multiple, complementary or not (i.e. redundant), distinct effects of animal species. To a large extent, the outcomes of these interactions crucially depend on the delayed consequences of frugivore effectiveness on plant recruitment. We evaluated seed dispersal effectiveness for three plant species in a Brazilian Atlantic forest with a marked habitat heterogeneity defined by bamboo and non-bamboo patches. Twenty one, 23 and 14 bird species ate fruits of Euterpe edulis, Sloanea...

Data from: DNA barcoding and minibarcoding as a powerful tool for feather mite studies

Jorge Doña, Javier Diaz-Real, Sergey Mironov, Pilar Bazaga, David Serrano & Roger Jovani
Feather mites (Astigmata: Analgoidea and Pterolichoidea) are among the most abundant and commonly occurring bird ectosymbionts. Basic questions on the ecology and evolution of feather mites remain unanswered because feather mite species identification is often only possible for adult males, and it is laborious even for specialized taxonomists, thus precluding large-scale identifications. Here, we tested DNA barcoding as a useful molecular tool to identify feather mites from passerine birds. Three hundred and sixty-one specimens of...

Data from: Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

Heloise Gibb, Nathan J. Sanders, Robert R. Dunn, Simon Watson, Manoli Photakis, Silvia Abril, Alan N. Andersen, Elena Angulo, Inge Armbrecht, Xavier Arnan, Fabricio B. Baccaro, Tom R. Bishop, Raphael Boulay, Cristina Castracani, Israel Del Toro, Thibaut Delsinne, Mireia Diaz, David A. Donoso, Martha L. Enríquez, Tom M. Fayle, Donald H. Feener, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Crisanto Gómez, Donato A. Grasso, Sarah Groc … & C. Gomez
Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction...

Data from: Unraveling conflicting density- and distance-dependent effects on plant reproduction using a spatially-explicit approach

José M. Fedriani, Thorsten Wiegand, Gemma Calvo, Alberto Suárez-Esteban, Miguel Jácome, Magdalena Żywiec & Miguel Delibes
1. Density- and distance-dependent (DDD) mechanisms are important determinants of plant reproductive success (PRS). Different components of sequential PRS can operate either in the same or in different directions and thus reinforce or neutralize each other, and they may also operate at different spatial scales. Thus, spatially-explicit approaches are needed to detect such complex DDD effects across multiple PRS components and spatial scales. 2. To reveal DDD effects of different components of early PRS of...

Data from: Bottlenecks and selective sweeps during domestication have increased deleterious genetic variation in dogs

Clare D. Marsden, Diego Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Dennis P. O'Brien, Jeremy F. Taylor, Oscar Ramirez, Carles Vila, Tomas Marques-Bonet, Robert D. Schnabel, Robert K. Wayne & Kirk E. Lohmueller
Population bottlenecks, inbreeding, and artificial selection can all, in principle, influence levels of deleterious genetic variation. However, the relative importance of each of these effects on genome-wide patterns of deleterious variation remains controversial. Domestic and wild canids offer a powerful system to address the role of these factors in influencing deleterious variation because their history is dominated by known bottlenecks and intense artificial selection. Here, we assess genome-wide patterns of deleterious variation in 90 whole-genome...

Data from: Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation

Alex Richter-Boix, Marco Katzenberger, Helder Duarte, María Quintela, Miguel Tejedo & Anssi Laurila
While temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve (TPC) and critical thermal maximum (CTmax)) and life history (thermal developmental reaction norms (TDRN)) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the...

Data from: Assembly mechanisms determining high species turnover in aquatic communities over regional and continental scales

Duarte S. Viana, Jordi Figuerola, Klaus Schwenk, Marina Manca, Anders Hobæk, Marit Mjelde, Christopher D. Preston, Richard J. Gornall, Jane M. Croft, Robert A. King, Andy J. Green & Luis Santamaría
Niche and neutral processes drive community assembly and metacommunity dynamics, but their relative importance might vary with the spatial scale. The contribution of niche processes is generally expected to increase with increasing spatial extent at a higher rate than that of neutral processes. However, the extent to what community composition is limited by dispersal (usually considered a neutral process) over increasing spatial scales might depend on the dispersal capacity of composing species. To investigate the...

Data from: The influence of landscape configuration and environment on population genetic structure in a sedentary passerine: insights from loci located in different genomic regions

Esperanza S. Ferrer, Vicente García-Navas, Javier Bueno-Enciso, Rafael Barrientos, Eva Serrano-Davies, Conchi Cáliz-Campal, Juan J. Sanz & Joaquín Ortego
The study of the factors structuring genetic variation can help to infer the neutral and adaptive processes shaping the demographic and evolutionary trajectories of natural populations. Here, we analyse the role of isolation-by distance (IBD), isolation-by-resistance (IBR, defined by landscape composition), and isolation by environment (IBE, estimated as habitat and elevation dissimilarity) in structuring genetic variation of 25 blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) populations. We typed 1385 individuals at 26 microsatellite loci classified in two groups...

Data from: Ageing and reproduction: antioxidant supplementation alleviates telomere loss in wild birds

Elisa P. Badas, Javier Martínez, Juan Rivero De Aguilar Cachafeiro, Francisco Miranda, Jordi Figuerola & Santiago Merino
Reproduction is inherently costly. Environmental stressors, such as infection and limited food resources, can compromise investment at each breeding attempt. For example, recent data on captive birds showed that increased reproductive effort accelerates ageing. However, the effects of nutritional status and infection on ageing remain unknown. Telomeres function as protective caps at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, and changes in telomere length is a commonly used proxy for ageing. To partially address the mechanisms of...

Data from: Ambient temperature, body condition and sibling rivalry explain feather corticosterone levels in developing black kites

Lidia López-Jiménez, Julio Blas, Alessandro Tanferna, Sonia Cabezas, Tracy Marchant, Fernando Hiraldo & Fabrizio Sergio
In birds, the steroid hormone corticosterone (CORT) is considered a major mediator in a number of physiological mechanisms and behaviours critical for the regulation of an organism's energy balance. However, the question of whether the way in which circulating plasma CORT is incorporated into feathers actually reflects this regulation, and consequently whether feather CORT (CORT-F) measures allow to make inferences on past levels of energetic demands (also known as the allostatic load), remains unclear. While...

Data from: Shared genetic diversity across the global invasive range of the Monk parakeet suggests a common restricted geographic origin and the possibility of convergent selection

Pim Edelaar, Severine Roques, Elizabeth A. Hobson, Anders Gonçalves Da Silva, Michael L. Avery, Michael A. Russello, Juan Carlos Senar, Timothy F. Wright, Martina Carrete & Jose Luis Tella
While genetic diversity is hypothesized to be an important factor explaining invasion success, there is no consensus yet on how variation in source populations or demographic processes affects invasiveness. We used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic and microsatellite genotypic data to investigate levels of genetic variation and reconstruct the history of replicate invasions on three continents in a globally invasive bird, the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). We evaluated whether genetic diversity at invasive sites could be explained...

Data from: From steps to home range formation: species-specific movement upscaling among sympatric ungulates

Zulima Tablado, Eloy Revilla, Dominique Dubray, Sonia Saïd, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Animals move to interact with the environment in order to find food resources and cover. Intrinsic characteristics affecting feeding and antipredatory strategies likely shape variation in movement patterns and home range formation between individuals, populations and species. Browsing herbivores selectively forage on patchily distributed resources in areas with more canopy cover, whereas mixed feeders and grazers feed on more open grasslands and tend to aggregate as an antipredatory strategy. We therefore predicted that at small...

Data from: Consequences of extensive habitat fragmentation in landscape-level patterns of genetic diversity and structure in the Mediterranean esparto grasshopper

Joaquín Ortego, María Pilar Aguirre, Víctor Noguerales & Pedro Javier Cordero
Anthropogenic habitat fragmentation has altered the distribution and population sizes in many organisms worldwide. For this reason, understanding the demographic and genetic consequences of this process is necessary to predict the fate of populations and establish management practices aimed to ensure their viability. In this study, we analyse whether the spatial configuration of remnant semi-natural habitat patches within a chronically fragmented landscape has shaped the patterns of genetic diversity and structure in the habitat-specialist esparto...

Data from: Fine-scale kin recognition in the absence of social familiarity in the Siberian jay, a monogamous bird species

Michael Griesser, Peter Halvarsson, Szymon M. Drobniak & Carles Vilà
Kin recognition is a critical element to kin cooperation, and in vertebrates, it is primarily based on associative learning. Recognition of socially unfamiliar kin occurs rarely, and it is reported only in vertebrate species where promiscuity prevents recognition of first-order relatives. However, it is unknown whether the recognition of socially unfamiliar kin can evolve in monogamous species. Here, we investigate whether genetic relatedness modulates aggression among group members in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus). This bird...

Data from: Discordant patterns of genetic and phenotypic differentiation in five grasshopper species co-distributed across a microreserve network

Joaquín Ortego, Vicente García-Navas, Víctor Noguerales & Pedro Javier Cordero
Conservation plans can be greatly improved when information on the evolutionary and demographic consequences of habitat fragmentation is available for several co-distributed species. Here, we study spatial patterns of phenotypic and genetic variation among five grasshopper species that are co-distributed across a network of microreserves but show remarkable differences in dispersal-related morphology (body size and wing length), degree of habitat specialization and extent of fragmentation of their respective habitats in the study region. In particular,...

Data from: Unravelling the evolutionary history and future prospects of endemic species restricted to former glacial refugia

Orly Razgour, Irene Salicini, Carlos Ibáñez, Ettore Randi & Javier Juste
The contemporary distribution and genetic composition of biodiversity bear a signature of species’ evolutionary histories and the effects of past climatic oscillations. For many European species, the Mediterranean peninsulas of Iberia, Italy and the Balkans acted as glacial refugia and the source of range recolonization, and as a result, they contain disproportionately high levels of diversity. As these areas are particularly threatened by future climate change, it is important to understand how past climatic changes...

Data from: Species mtDNA genetic diversity explained by infrapopulation size in a host-symbiont system

Jorge Doña, Marina Moreno-García, Charles D. Criscione, David Serrano & Roger Jovani
Understanding what shapes variation in genetic diversity among species remains a major challenge in evolutionary ecology, and it has been seldom studied in parasites and other host-symbiont systems. Here, we studied mtDNA variation in a host-symbiont non-model system: 418 individual feather mites from 17 feather mite species living on 17 different passerine bird species. We explored how a surrogate of census size, the median infrapopulation size (i.e., the median number of individual parasites per infected...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    18
  • University of Zurich
    3
  • Institute for Game and Wildlife Research
    2
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    2
  • Uppsala University
    2
  • University of Castile-La Mancha
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • National Museum
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1