21 Works

Too much is bad: increasing numbers of livestock and conspecifics reduce body mass in an avian scavenger

José Antonio Donázar, Jomar Barbosa, Marina García-Alfonso, Mathijs Van Overveld, Laura Gangoso & Manuel De La Riva
Individual traits such as body mass can serve as early warning signals of changes in the fitness prospects of animal populations facing environmental impacts. Here, taking advantage of a 19-year monitoring, we assessed how individual, population and environmental factors modulate long-term changes in the body mass of Canarian Egyptian vultures. Individual vulture body mass increased when primary productivity was highly variable, but decreased in years with a high abundance of livestock. We hypothesized that carcasses...

Bird species in the diet of the birdlike noctule bat, Nyctalus aviator, in Japan.

Carlos Ibañez, Dai Fukui, Ana G. Popa-Lisseanu, David Pastor-Beviá, Juan L. García-Mudarra & Javier Juste
We investigate the birds in the diet of the birdlike noctule (Nyctalus aviator) through DNA amplification from feather remains found in fecal pellets. Our goal was to confirm that N. aviator preys on nocturnally migratory species, as does its European relative N. lasiopterus, and to gain insights into this hunting strategy (e.g. on the wing vs. from cavity-nest). The diversity and the characteristics of the birds found in the feces remains indicate that in Japan...

Data from: Cascading effects of climate variability on the breeding success of an edge population of an apex predator

Laura Gangoso, Duarte Viana, Adriaan Dokter, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Jordi Figuerola, Sergio Barbosa & Willem Bouten
1. Large-scale environmental forces can influence biodiversity at different levels of biological organization. Climate, in particular, is often associated to species distributions and diversity gradients. However, its mechanistic link to population dynamics is still poorly understood. 2. Here, we unraveled the full mechanistic path by which a climatic driver, the Atlantic trade winds, determines the viability of a bird population. 3. We monitored the breeding population of Eleonora’s falcons in the Canary Islands for over...

Data from: Gradual replacement of wild bees by honeybees in flowers of the Mediterranean Basin over the last 50 years

Carlos M. Herrera
Evidence for pollinator declines largely originates from mid-latitude regions in North America and Europe. Geographical heterogeneity in pollinator trends combined with geographical biases in pollinator studies, can produce distorted extrapolations and limit understanding of pollinator responses to environmental changes. In contrast to the declines experienced in some well-investigated European and North American regions, honeybees seem to have increased recently in some areas of the Mediterranean Basin. Since honeybees can have negative impacts on wild bees,...

What drives diversification in a pantropical plant lineage with extraordinary capacity for long-distance dispersal and colonisation?

Isabel Larridon, Javier Galán Díaz, Kenneth Bauters & Marcial Escudero
Aim: Colonisation of new areas may entail shifts in diversification rates linked to biogeographic movement (dispersification), which may involve niche evolution if species were not pre-adapted to the new environments. Scleria (Cyperaceae) includes c. 250 species and has a pantropical distribution suggesting an extraordinary capacity for long-distance dispersal and colonisation. We investigate patterns of diversification in Scleria, and whether they are coupled with colonisation events, climate niche shifts or both. Location: Tropics and subtropics. Taxon:...

Paraphyletic species no more – genomic data resolve a Pleistocene radiation and validate morphological species of the Melanoplus scudderi complex (Insecta: Orthoptera)

Jen-Pan Huang, JoVonn G. Hill, Joaquín Ortego & L. Lacey Knowles
Rapid speciation events, with taxa generated over a short time period, are among the most investigated biological phenomena. However, molecular systematics often reveals contradictory results compared with morphological/phenotypical diagnoses of species under scenarios of recent and rapid diversification. In this study, we used molecular data from an average of over 29,000 loci per sample from RADseq to reconstruct the diversification history and delimit the species boundary in a short-winged grasshopper species complex (Melanoplus Scudderi group),...

Recipient and donor characteristics govern the hierarchical structure of heterospecific pollen competition networks

Jose B. Lanuza, Ignasi Bartomeus, Tia-Lynn Ashman & Romina Rader
Pollinator sharing can have negative consequences for plant fitness with the arrival of foreign (i.e. heterospecific) pollen, yet responses are often variable among species. Plant traits and relatedness of donor and recipient species have been suggested to drive the variations in plant fitness, but how they shape the structure of pollen competition networks has been overlooked at the community level. To understand the importance of reproductive traits and relatedness on the impacts of heterospecific pollen...

Vastly underestimated radiation of Amazonian salamanders (Plethodontidae: Bolitoglossa) and implications about plethodontid diversification

Andres Felipe Jaramillo, Ignacio De La Riva, Juan M. Guayasamin, Juan C. Chaparro, Giussepe Gagliardi-Urrutia, Roberto Gutierrez, Isabela Brcko, Carles Vila & Santiago Castroviejo-Fisher
We present data showing that the number of salamander species in Amazonia is vastly underestimated. We used DNA sequences of up to five genes (3 mitochondrial and 2 nuclear) of 366 specimens, 189 corresponding to 89 non-Amazonian nominal species and 177 Amazonian specimens, including types or topotypes, of eight of the nine recognized species in the region. By including representatives of all known species of Amazonian Bolitoglossa, except for one, and 73 % of the...

Genomic insights into the origin of trans-Mediterranean disjunct distributions: The case of the saltmarsh band-winged grasshopper (Mioscirtus wagneri)

Víctor Noguerales, Pedro J. Cordero, L. Lacey Knowles & Joaquín Ortego
Aim: Two main biogeographic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the Mediterranean-Turanian disjunct distributions exhibited by numerous steppe-dwelling organisms, namely (i) dispersal during the Messinian salinity crisis (∼5.96-5.33 Ma) followed by range fragmentation and vicariance, and (ii) Pleistocene colonization and recent processes of population subdivision (<2 Ma). Despite the two hypotheses postulate the role of climatic alterations and changes in landmass configuration on determining such disjunct distributions, estimates of the timing of lineage diversification have...

Data from: Identifying 'useful' fitness models: balancing the benefits of added complexity with realistic data requirements in models of individual plant fitness

Trace Martyn, Daniel Stouffer, Oscar Godoy, Ignasi Bartomeus, Abigail Pastore & Margaret Mayfield
Direct species interactions are commonly included in individual fitness models used for coexistence and local-diversity modeling. Though widely considered important for such models, direct interactions alone are often insufficient for accurately predicting fitness, coexistence or diversity outcomes. Incorporating higher-order interactions (HOIs) can lead to more accurate individual fitness models, but also adds many model terms, which can quickly result in model over-fitting. We explore approaches for balancing the trade-off between tractability and model accuracy that...

Trophic resource partitioning drives fine-scale coexistence in cryptic bat species

Orly Razgour, Roberto Novella-Fernandez, Carlos Ibáñez, Javier Juste, Beth Clare & C. Patrick Doncaster
Understanding the processes that enable species coexistence has important implications for assessing how ecological systems will respond to global change. Morphology and functional similarity increase the potential for competition, and therefore, co-occurring morphologically similar but genetically unique species are a good model system for testing coexistence mechanisms. We used DNA metabarcoding and High Throughput Sequencing to characterise for the first time the trophic ecology of two recently-described cryptic bat species with parapatric ranges, Myotis escalerai...

Ecological, genetic and evolutionary drivers of regional genetic differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana

Xavier Picó, Antonio Castilla, Belen Mendez-Vigo, Arnald Marcer, Joaquin Martinez-Minaya, David Conesa & Carlos Alonso-Blanco
Background: Disentangling the drivers of genetic differentiation is one of the cornerstones in evolution. This is because genetic diversity, and the way in which it is partitioned within and among populations across space, is an important asset for the ability of populations to adapt and persist in changing environments. We tested three major hypotheses accounting for genetic differentiation—isolation-by-distance (IBD), isolation-by-environment (IBE) and isolation-by-resistance (IBR)—in the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana across the Iberian Peninsula, the region...

The roles of acclimation and behavior in buffering climate change impacts along elevational gradients

Urtzi Enriquez-Urzelai, Reid Tingley, Michael Kearney, Martina Sacco, Antonio Palacio, Miguel Tejedo & Alfredo Nicieza
1. The vulnerability of species to climate change is jointly influenced by geographic phenotypic variation, acclimation, and behavioral thermoregulation. The importance of interactions between these factors, however, remains poorly understood. 2. We demonstrate how advances in mechanistic niche modelling can be used to integrate and assess the influence of these sources of uncertainty in forecasts of climate change impacts. 3. We explored geographic variation in thermal tolerance (i.e. maximum and minimum thermal limits) and its...

Data from: The relative importance of green infrastructure as refuge habitat for pollinators increases with local land-use intensity

Pengyao Li, David Kleijn, Isabelle Badenhausser, Carlos Zaragoza-Trello, Nicolas Gross, Ivo Raemakers & Jeroen Scheper
1. Agricultural expansion and intensification have resulted in strong declines in farmland biodiversity across Europe. In many intensively farmed landscapes, linear landscape elements such as field boundaries, road verges and ditch banks are the main remaining green infrastructures providing refuge for biodiversity, and as such play a pivotal role in agri-environmental policies aiming at mitigating biodiversity loss. Yet, while we have a fairly good understanding of how agricultural intensification influences biodiversity on farmland, little is...

Data from: A critical analysis of the potential for EU Common Agricultural Policy measures to support wild pollinators on farmland

Lorna Cole, David Kleijn, Lynn Dicks, Jane Stout, Simon Potts, Matthias Albrecht, Mario Balzan, Ignasi Bartomeus, Penelope Bebeli, Danilo Bevk, Jacobus Biesmeijer, Róbert Chlebo, Anželika Dautartė, Nikolaos Emmanouil, Chris Hartfield, John Holland, Andrea Holzschuh, Nieke Knoben, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Yael Mandelik, Heleni Panou, Robert Paxton, Theodora Petanidou, Miguel Pinheiro De Carvalho, … & Jeroen Scheper
1. Agricultural intensification and associated loss of high-quality habitats are key drivers of insect pollinator declines. With the aim of decreasing the environmental impact of agriculture, the 2014 EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) defined a set of habitat and landscape features (Ecological Focus Areas: EFAs) farmers could select from as a requirement to receive basic farm payments. To inform the post-2020 CAP, we performed a European-scale evaluation to determine how different EFA options vary in...

Data from: Telomere attrition with age in a wild amphibian population

Gregorio Sánchez-Montes, Íñigo Martínez-Solano, Carmen Díaz-Paniagua, Antonio Vilches, Arturo H Ariño & Ivan Gomez-Mestre
Telomere shortening with age has been documented in many organisms, but few studies have reported telomere length measurements in amphibians, and no information is available for growth after metamorphosis, nor in wild populations. We provide both cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence of net telomere attrition with age in a wild amphibian population of natterjack toads (Epidalea calamita). Based on age-estimation by skeletochronology and qPCR telomere length measurements in the framework of an individual-based monitoring programme, we...

Rethinking megafauna

Marcos Moleón, José Sánchez-Zapata, José Donázar, Eloy Revilla, Berta Martín-López, Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Wayne Getz, Zebensui Morales-Reyes, Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, Larry Crowder, Mauro Galetti, Manuela González-Suárez, Fengzhi He, Pedro Jordano, Rebecca Lewison, Robin Naidoo, Norman Owen-Smith, Nuria Selva, Jens-Christian Svenning, José Tella, Christiane Zarfl, Sonja Jähnig, Matt Hayward, Søren Faurby, Nuria García … & Klement Tochner
Concern for megafauna is increasing among scientists and non-scientists. Many studies have emphasized that megafauna play prominent ecological roles and provide important ecosystem services to humanity. But, what precisely are “megafauna”? Here we critically assess the concept of megafauna and propose a goal-oriented framework for megafaunal research. First, we review definitions of megafauna and analyze associated terminology in the scientific literature. Second, we conduct a survey among ecologists and paleontologists to assess the species traits...

Pollen transfer networks reveal alien species as main heterospecific pollen donors with fitness consequences for natives

Victor Parra-Tabla, Conchita Alonso, Tia-Lynn Ashman, Robert Raguso, Cristopher Albor, Paula Sosenski, Diego Carmona & Gerardo Arceo-Gómez
The ecological dynamics of co-flowering communities are largely mediated by pollinators. However, current understanding of pollinator-mediated interactions primarily relies on how co-flowering plants influence attraction of shared pollinators, and much less is known about plan-plant interactions that occur via heterospecific pollen (HP) transfer. Invaded communities in particular can be highly affected by the transfer of alien pollen, but the strength, drivers, and fitness consequences of these interactions at a community scale are not well understood....

Up in the air: threats to Afromontane biodiversity from climate change and habitat loss revealed by genetic monitoring of the Ethiopian Highlands bat

Orly Razgour, Mohammed Kasso, Helena Santos & Javier Juste
Whilst climate change is recognised as a major future threat to biodiversity, most species are currently threatened by extensive human-induced habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation. Tropical high altitude alpine and montane forest ecosystems and their biodiversity are particularly sensitive to temperature increases under climate change, but they are also subject to accelerated pressures from land conversion and degradation due to a growing human population. We studied the combined effects of anthropogenic land-use change, past and...

Data from: Feeding specialisation and longer generation time are associated with relatively larger brains in bees

Ferran Sayol, Miguel Á. Collado, Joan Garcia-Porta, Marc A. Seid, Jason Gibbs, Ainhoa Agorreta, Diego San Mauro, Ivo Raemakers, Daniel Sol & Ignasi Bartomeus
Despite their miniature brains, insects exhibit substantial variation in brain size. Although the functional significance of this variation is increasingly recognized, research on whether differences in insect brain sizes are mainly the result of constraints or selective pressures has hardly been performed. Here, we address this gap by combining prospective and retrospective phylogenetic-based analyses of brain size for a major insect group, bees (superfamily Apoidea). Using a brain dataset of 93 species from North America...

Association of insularity to cloacal bacteria prevalence and body condition in a small shorebird

Jose Valdebenito, Josué Martínez-De La Puente, Macarena Castro, Alejandro Pérez-Hurtado, Gustavo Tejera, Tamás Székely, Naerhulan Halimubieke, Julia Schroeder & Jordi Figuerola
Do islands harbour less diverse disease communities than mainland? The island biogeography theory predicts more diverse communities on mainland than on islands due to more niches, more diverse habitats and availability of greater range of hosts. We compared bacteria prevalences of Campylobacter, Chlamydia and Salmonella in cloacal samples of a small shorebird, the Kentish plover (Charadrius alexandrinus) between two island populations of Macaronesia and two mainland locations in the Iberian Peninsula. Bacteria were found in...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    21
  • Centre for Research on Ecology and Forestry Applications
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2
  • University of Reading
    2
  • University of Oviedo
    1
  • Bangor University
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Würzburg
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1