35 Works

Atlas of Bacterial and Archaeal Cell Structure

Catherine Oikonomou & Grant Jensen

Data from: Partitioning the effects of spatial isolation, nest habitat, and individual diet in causing assortative mating within a population of threespine stickleback

Lisa Kathryn Snowberg & Daniel I. Bolnick
Assortative mating is measured as a phenotypic or genotypic correlation between mates. Although biologists typically view assortative mating in terms of mate preference for similar partners, correlations between mates can also arise from phenotypic spatial structure arising from spatial isolation or habitat preferences. Here, we test whether diet-assortative mating within an ecologically variable population of threespine stickleback results from small-scale geographic isolation or microhabitat preference. We find evidence for assortative mating in the form of...

Data from: Natural selection interacts with recombination to shape the evolution of hybrid genomes

Molly Schumer, Chenling Xu, Daniel L Powell, Arun Durvasula, Laurits Skov, Chris Holland, John C Blazier, Sriram Sankararaman, Peter Andolfatto, Gil G Rosenthal & Molly Przeworski
To investigate the consequences of hybridization between species, we studied three replicate hybrid populations that formed naturally between two swordtail fish species, estimating their fine-scale genetic map and inferring ancestry along the genomes of 690 individuals. In all three populations, ancestry from the “minor” parental species is more common in regions of high recombination and where there is linkage to fewer putative targets of selection. The same patterns are apparent in a reanalysis of human...

Data from: Live-cell single particle imaging reveals the role of RNA polymerase II in histone H2A.Z eviction

Anand Ranjan, Vu Q. Nguyen, Sheng Liu, Jan Wisniewski, Kim Jee Min, Xiaona Tang, Gaku Mizuguchi, Vivian Jou, Timothy J. Nickels, Brian P. English, Qinsi Zheng, Ed Luk, Timothee Lionnet, Luke D. Lavis, Carl Wu & Ejlal Elalaoui
The H2A.Z histone variant, a genome-wide hallmark of permissive chromatin, is enriched near transcription start sites in all eukaryotes. H2A.Z is deposited by the SWR1 chromatin remodeler and evicted by unclear mechanisms. We tracked H2A.Z in living yeast at single-molecule resolution, and found that H2A.Z eviction is dependent on RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) and the Kin28/Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Serine 5 of heptapeptide repeats on the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit...

Data from: Impaired spatial memory codes in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

Sara E. Kee, Xiang Mou, Huda Y. Zoghbi & Daoyun Ji
The Mecp2+/-mouse model recapitulates many phenotypes of patients with Rett syndrome (RTT), including learning and memory deficits. It is unknown, however, how the disease state alters memory circuit functions in vivoin RTT mice. Here we recorded from hippocampal place cells, which are thought to encode spatial memories, in freely moving RTT mice and littermate controls. We found that place cells in RTT mice are impaired in their experience-dependent increase of spatial information. This impairment is...

Data from: Stoichiometry controls activity of phase-separated clusters of actin signaling proteins

Lindsay B. Case, Xu Zhang, Jonathon A. Ditlev & Michael K. Rosen
Biomolecular condensates concentrate macromolecules into foci without a surrounding membrane. Many condensates appear to form through multivalent interactions that drive liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). LLPS increases the specific activity of actin regulatory proteins toward actin assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. We show that this increase occurs because LLPS of the Nephrin–Nck–N-WASP signaling pathway on lipid bilayers increases membrane dwell time of N-WASP and Arp2/3 complex, consequently increasing actin assembly. Dwell time varies with relative stoichiometry...

Data from: Convergence and non-convergence in ecological, phenotypic, and genetic divergence across replicate population pairs of lake and stream stickleback

Renaud Kaeuffer, Catherine Lynn Peichel, Daniel I. Bolnick & Andrew P. Hendry
Convergent (or parallel) evolution provides strong evidence for a deterministic role of natural selection: similar phenotypes evolve when independent populations colonize similar environments. In reality, however, independent populations in similar environments always show some differences: some non-convergent evolution is present. It is therefore important to explicitly quantify the convergent and non-convergent aspects of trait variation, and to investigate the ecological and genetic explanations for each. We performed such an analysis for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)...

Data from: Experimental evolution of Legionella pneumophila in mouse macrophages leads to strains with altered determinants of environmental survival

Alexander W. Ensminger, Yosuf Yassin, Alexander Miron & Ralph R. Isberg
The Gram-negative bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, is a protozoan parasite and accidental intracellular pathogen of humans. We propose a model in which host cycling through multiple protozoan hosts in the environment holds L. pneumophila in a state of evolutionary stasis as a broad host-range pathogen. Using an experimental evolution approach, we tested this hypothesis by restricting L. pneumophila to growth within mouse macrophages for hundreds of generations. Whole-genome resequencing and high-throughput genotyping identified several parallel adaptive...

Data from: Synchronized excitability in a network enables generation of internal neuronal sequences

Yingxue Wang, Zachary Roth & Eva Pastalkova
Hippocampal place field sequences are supported by sensory cues and network internal mechanisms. In contrast, sharp-wave (SPW) sequences, theta sequences, and episode field sequences are internally generated. The relationship of these sequences to memory is unclear. SPW sequences have been shown to support learning and have been assumed to also support episodic memory. Conversely, we demonstrate these SPW sequences were present in trained rats even after episodic memory was impaired and after other internal sequences...

Data from: Tensor analysis reveals distinct population structure that parallels the different computational roles of areas M1 and V1

Jeffrey S. Seely, Matthew T. Kaufman, Stephen I. Ryu, Krishna V. Shenoy, John P. Cunningham & Mark M. Churchland
Cortical firing rates frequently display elaborate and heterogeneous temporal structure. One often wishes to compute quantitative summaries of such structure—a basic example is the frequency spectrum—and compare with model-based predictions. The advent of large-scale population recordings affords the opportunity to do so in new ways, with the hope of distinguishing between potential explanations for why responses vary with time. We introduce a method that assesses a basic but previously unexplored form of population-level structure: when...

Inference of nonlinear receptive field subunits with spike-triggered clustering

Nishal Shah, Nora Brackbill, Colleen Rhoades, Alexandra Kling, Georges Goetz, Alan Litke, Alexander Sher, Eero Simoncelli & E.J. Chichilnisky
Responses of sensory neurons are often modeled using a weighted combination of rectified linear subunits. Since these subunits often cannot be measured directly, a flexible method is needed to infer their properties from the responses of downstream neurons. We present a method for maximum likelihood estimation of subunits by soft-clustering spike-triggered stimuli, and demonstrate its effectiveness in visual neurons. Subunits estimated from parasol retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in macaque retina partitioned the receptive field into...

Data from: Birth-and-death evolution of the fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) gene family and diversification of cuticular hydrocarbon synthesis in Drosophila

Cédric Finet, Kailey Slavik, Jian Pu, Sean B. Carroll & Henry Chung
The birth-and-death evolutionary model proposes that some members of a multigene family are phylogenetically stable and persist as a single copy over time whereas other members are phylogenetically unstable and undergo frequent duplication and loss. Functional studies suggest that stable genes are likely to encode essential functions, while rapidly evolving genes reflect phenotypic differences in traits that diverge rapidly among species. One such class of rapidly diverging traits are insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), which play...

Data from: Improving transcriptome assembly through error correction of high-throughput sequence reads

Matthew D. MacManes & Michael B. Eisen
The study of functional genomics, particularly in non-model organisms, has been dramatically improved over the last few years by the use of transcriptomes and RNAseq. While these studies are potentially extremely powerful, a computationally intensive procedure, the de novo construction of a reference transcriptome must be completed as a prerequisite to further analyses. The accurate reference is critically important as all downstream steps, including estimating transcript abundance are critically dependent on the construction of an...

Data from: The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes

Estienne C. Swart, John R. Bracht, Vincent Magrini, Patrick Minx, Xiao Chen, Yi Zhou, Jaspreet S. Khurana, Aaron D. Goldman, Mariusz Nowacki, Klaas Schotanus, Seolkyoung Jung, Robert S. Fulton, Amy Ly, Sean McGrath, Kevin Haub, Jessica L. Wiggins, Donna Storton, John C. Matese, Lance Parsons, Wei-Jen Chang, Michael S. Bowen, Nicholas A. Stover, Thomas A. Jones, Sean R. Eddy, Thomas G. Doak … & Laura F. Landweber
The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (~5%) of its precursor “silent” germline micronuclear genome by a process of “unscrambling” and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear “nanochromosomes” typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2–8 genes), have minimal noncoding regions,...

Pinpointing the neural signatures of single-exposure visual recognition memory

Vahid Mehrpour, Travis Meyer, Eero P. Simoncelli & Nicole C. Rust
Memories of the images that we have seen are thought to be reflected in the reduction of neural responses in high-level visual areas such as inferotemporal (IT) cortex, a phenomenon known as repetition suppression (RS). We challenged this hypothesis with a task that required rhesus monkeys to report whether images were novel or repeated while ignoring variations in contrast, a stimulus attribute that is also known to modulate the overall IT response. The monkeys’ behavior...

Data from: Pioneer cells established by the [SWI+] prion can promote dispersal and out-crossing in yeast

Gregory A. Newby & Susan Lindquist
To thrive in an ever-changing environment, microbes must widely distribute their progeny to colonize new territory. Simultaneously, they must evolve and adapt to the stresses of unpredictable surroundings. In both of these regards, diversity is key—if an entire population moved together or responded to the environment in the same way, it could easily go extinct. Here, we show that the epigenetic prion switch [SWI+] establishes a specialized subpopulation with a “pioneer” phenotypic program in Saccharomyces...

Data from: Signatures of divergence, invasiveness and terrestralization revealed by four apple snail genomes

Jin Sun, Huawei Mu, Jack C. H. Ip, Runsheng Li, Ting Xu, Alice Accorsi, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado, Eric Ross, Yi Lan, Yanan Sun, Alfredo Castro-Vazquez, Israel A. Vega, Horacio Heras, Santiago Ituarte, Bert Van Bocxlaer, Kenneth A. Hayes, Robert H. Cowie, Zhongying Zhao, Yu Zhang, Pei-Yuan Qian & Jian-Wen Qiu
The family Ampullariidae includes both aquatic and amphibious apple snails. They are an emerging model for evolutionary studies due to the high diversity, ancient history and wide geographical distribution. Insight into drivers of ampullariid evolution is hampered, however, by the lack of genomic resources. Here we report the genomes of four ampullariids spanning the Old World (Lanistes nyassanus) and New World (Pomacea canaliculata, Pomacea maculata and Marisa cornuarietis) clades. The ampullariid genomes have conserved ancient...

Data from: Gene flow mediates the role of sex chromosome meiotic drive during complex speciation

Colin D. Meiklejohn, Emily L. Landeen, Kathleen E. Gordon, Thomas Rzatkiewicz, Sarah B. Kingan, Anthony J. Geneva, Jeffrey P. Vedanayagam, Christina A. Muirhead, Daniel Garrigan, David L. Stern & Daven C. Presgraves
During speciation, sex chromosomes often accumulate interspecific genetic incompatibilities faster than the rest of the genome. The drive theory posits that sex chromosomes are susceptible to recurrent bouts of meiotic drive and suppression, causing the evolutionary build-up of divergent cryptic sex-linked drive systems and, incidentally, genetic incompatibilities. To assess the role of drive during speciation, we combine high-resolution genetic mapping of X-linked hybrid male sterility with population genomics analyses of divergence and recent gene flow...

Data supplement for: Disrupting cortico-cerebellar communication impairs dexterity

Britton Sauerbrei, Jian-Zhong Guo, Jeremy Cohen, Matteo Mischiati, Austin Graves, Ferruccio Pisanello, Kristin Branson & Adam Hantman
This dataset, along with the corresponding code, is a supplement to “Disrupting cortico-cerebellar communication impairs dexterity” (Guo*, Sauerbrei* et al., eLife 2021). It consists of single-unit electrophysiology data from the pontine nuclei, Purkinje cells, cerebellar nuclei, and motor cortex of awake mice, along with measurements of the hand position of mice performing reaching movements. These data address the question of how the dynamics of motor cortex and cerebellum interact to control skilled reaching. First, we...

A dominant-negative SOX18 mutant disrupts multiple regulatory layers essential to transcription factor activity

Jieqiong Lou, Alex McCann, Mehdi Moustaqil, Matthew Graus, Ailisa Blum, Frank Fontaine, Hui Liu, Winnie Luu, Peter Koopman, Emma Sierecki, Yann Gambin, Frédéric Meunier, Zhe Liu, Elizabeth Hinde & Mathias Francois
Few genetically dominant mutations involved in human disease have been fully explained at the molecular level. In cases where the mutant gene encodes a transcription factor, the dominant-negative mode of action of the mutant protein is particularly poorly understood. Here, we studied the genome-wide mechanism underlying a dominant-negative form of the SOX18 transcription factor (SOX18RaOp) responsible for both the classical mouse mutant Ragged Opossum and the human genetic disorder Hypotrichosis-Lymphedema-Telangiectasia-Renal Syndrome. Combining three single-molecule imaging...

Data from: Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals posttranslational responses to aneuploidy in yeast

Eduardo M. Torres, Noah Dephoure, Sunyoung Hwang, Ciara O’Sullivan, Stacie E. Dodgson, Steve P. Gygi, Angelika Amon & Ciara O'Sullivan
Aneuploidy causes severe developmental defects and is a near universal feature of tumor cells. Despite its profound effects, the cellular processes affected by aneuploidy are not well characterized. Here, we examined the consequences of aneuploidy on the proteome of aneuploid budding yeast strains. We show that although protein levels largely scale with gene copy number, subunits of multi-protein complexes are notable exceptions. Posttranslational mechanisms attenuate their expression when their encoding genes are in excess. Our...

Data from: Genome-wide errant targeting by Hairy

Kurtulus Kok, Ahmet Ay, Li M. Li & David N. Arnosti
Metazoan transcriptional repressors regulate chromatin through diverse histone modifications. Contributions of individual factors to the chromatin landscape in development is difficult to establish, as global surveys reflect multiple changes in regulators. Therefore, we studied the conserved Hairy/Enhancer of Split family repressor Hairy, analyzing histone marks and gene expression in Drosophila embryos. This long-range repressor mediates histone acetylation and methylation in large blocks, with highly context-specific effects on target genes. Most strikingly, Hairy exhibits biochemical activity...

Data from: Genetic architecture and functional characterization of genes underlying the rapid diversification of male external genitalia between Drosophila simulans and Drosophila mauritiana

Kentaro M. Tanaka, Corinna Hopfen, Matthew R. Herbert, Christian Schlötterer, David L. Stern, John P. Masly, Alistair P. McGregor & Maria D. S. Nunes
Male sexual characters are often among the first traits to diverge between closely related species and identifying the genetic basis of such changes can contribute to our understanding of their evolutionary history. However, little is known about the genetic architecture or the specific genes underlying the evolution of male genitalia. The morphology of the claspers, posterior lobes and anal plates exhibit striking differences between Drosophila mauritiana and Drosophila simulans. Using QTL and introgression-based high-resolution mapping,...

Data from: Experimental and statistical reevaluation provides no evidence for Drosophila courtship song rhythms

David L. Stern, Jan Clemens, Philip Coen, Adam J. Calhoun, John B. Hogenesch, Ben J. Arthur & Mala Murthy
From 1980 to 1992, a series of influential papers reported on the discovery, genetics, and evolution of a periodic cycling of the interval between Drosophila male courtship song pulses. The molecular mechanisms underlying this periodicity were never described. To reinitiate investigation of this phenomenon, we previously performed automated segmentation of songs but failed to detect the proposed rhythm [Arthur BJ, et al. (2013) BMC Biol 11:11; Stern DL (2014) BMC Biol 12:38]. Kyriacou et al....

Data from: Efficient and accurate extraction of in vivo calcium signals from microendoscopic video data

Pengcheng Zhou, Shanna L. Resendez, Jose Rodriguez-Romaguera, Jessica C. Jimenez, Shay Q. Neufeld, Andrea Giovannucci, Johannes Friedrich, Eftychios A Pnevmatikakis, Garret D. Stuber, Rene Hen, Mazen A. Kheirbek, Bernardo L. Sabatini, Robert E. Kass & Liam Paninski
In vivo calcium imaging through microendoscopic lenses enables imaging of previously inaccessible neuronal populations deep within the brains of freely moving animals. However, it is computationally challenging to extract single-neuronal activity from microendoscopic data, because of the very large background fluctuations and high spatial overlaps intrinsic to this recording modality. Here, we describe a new constrained matrix factorization approach to accurately separate the background and then demix and denoise the neuronal signals of interest. We...

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