9 Works

Data from: Darwin’s finches and their diet niches: the sympatric coexistence of imperfect generalists

Luis F. De León, Jeffrey Podos, Tariq Gardezi, Anthony Herrel & Andrew P. Hendry
Adaptive radiation can be strongly influenced by interspecific competition for resources, which can lead to diverse outcomes ranging from competitive exclusion to character displacement. In each case, sympatric species are expected to evolve into distinct ecological niches, such as different food types, yet this expectation is not always met when such species are examined in nature. The most common hypotheses to account for the coexistence of species with substantial diet overlap rest on temporal variation...

Data from: Comparative and population mitogenomic analyses of Madagascar’s extinct, giant ‘subfossil’ lemurs

Logan Kistler, Aakrosh Ratan, Laurie R. Godfrey, Brooke E. Crowley, Cris E. Hughes, Runhua Lei, Yinqui Cui, Mindy L. Wood, Kathleen M. Muldoon, Haingoson Andriamialison, John J. McGraw, Lynn P. Tomsho, Stephan C. Schuster, Webb Miller, Edward E. Louis, Anne D. Yoder, Ripan S. Malhi, George H. Perry & Yinqiu Cui
Humans first arrived on Madagascar only a few thousand years ago. Subsequent habitat destruction and hunting activities have had significant impacts on the island's biodiversity, including the extinction of megafauna. For example, we know of 17 recently extinct ‘subfossil’ lemur species, all of which were substantially larger (body mass ∼11–160 kg) than any living population of the ∼100 extant lemur species (largest body mass ∼6.8 kg). We used ancient DNA and genomic methods to study...

Data from: Distance, flow, and PCR inhibition: eDNA dynamics in two headwater steams

Stephen F. Jane, Taylor M. Wilcox, Kevin S. McKelvey, Michael K. Young, Michael K. Schwartz, Winsor H. Lowe, Benjamin H. Letcher & Andrew R. Whiteley
Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic organisms, but much remains unknown about the dynamics of aquatic eDNA over a range of environmental conditions. DNA concentrations in streams and rivers will depend not only on the equilibrium between DNA entering the water and DNA leaving the system through degradation, but also on downstream transport. To improve understanding of the dynamics of eDNA concentration in lotic systems, we introduced caged...

Data from: Selection for mechanical advantage underlies multiple cranial optima in new world leaf-nosed bats

Elizabeth R. Dumont, Krishna Samadevam, Ian R. Grosse, Omar M. Warsi, Brandon Baird, Liliana M. Davalos & Ian Grosse
Selection for divergent performance optima has been proposed as a central mechanism underlying adaptive radiation. Uncovering multiple optima requires identifying forms associated with different adaptive zones and linking those forms to performance. However, testing and modeling the performance of complex morphologies like the cranium is challenging. We introduce a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of the cranium that can be morphed into different shapes by varying simple parameters to investigate the relationship between two engineering-based...

Data from: Trait compensation between boldness and the propensity for tail autotomy under different food availabilities in similarly-aged brown anole lizards

Chi-Yun Kuo, Duncan J. Irschick & Simon P. Lailvaux
1. Trait compensation denotes the situation in which individuals offset the costs of one trait with the benefits of another trait. The phenomenon of trait compensation is best exemplified by a negative correlation between the degree of predator avoidance and the strength of morphological defense. 2. In this study, we used the relationship between risk-taking tendency (boldness) and the propensity for tail autotomy in the brown anole lizards Anolis sagrei to address two important questions...

Data from: Genetic basis of continuous variation in the levels and modular inheritance of pigmentation in cichlid fishes

R. Craig Albertson, Kara E. Powder, Yinan Hu, Kaitlin P. Coyle, Reade B. Roberts & Kevin J. Parsons
Variation in pigmentation type and levels is a hallmark of myriad evolutionary radiations, and biologists have long been fascinated by the factors that promote and maintain variation in coloration across populations. Here we provide insights into the genetic basis of complex and continuous patterns of color variation in cichlid fishes, which offer a vast diversity of pigmentation patterns that have evolved in response to both natural and sexual selection. Specifically, we crossed two divergent cichlid...

Data from: A nanostructural basis for gloss of avian eggshells

Branislav Igic, Daphne Fecheyr-Lippens, Ming Xiao, Andrew Chan, Daniel Hanley, Patricia R. L. Brennan, Tomas Grim, Geoffrey I. N. Waterhouse, Mark E. Hauber & Matthew D. Shawkey
The role of pigments in generating the colour and maculation of birds' eggs is well characterized, whereas the effects of the eggshell's nanostructure on the visual appearance of eggs are little studied. Here, we examined the nanostructural basis of glossiness of tinamou eggs. Tinamou eggs are well known for their glossy appearance, but the underlying mechanism responsible for this optical effect is unclear. Using experimental manipulations in conjunction with angle-resolved spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic...

Data from: Joined at the hip: linked characters and the problem of missing data in studies of disparity

Andrew John Smith, Michael V. Rosario, Thomas P. Eiting & Elizabeth R. Dumont
Paleontological investigations into morphological diversity, or disparity, are often confronted with large amounts of missing data. We illustrate how missing discrete data effects disparity using a novel simulation for removing data based on parameters from published datasets that contain both extinct and extant taxa. We develop an algorithm that assesses the distribution of missing characters in extinct taxa, and simulates data loss by applying that distribution to extant taxa. We term this technique ‘linkage’. We...

Data from: How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats

Thomas P. Eiting, J. Blair Perot & Elizabeth R. Dumont
The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    9
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Hunter College
    1
  • Jilin University
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • University of Virginia
    1
  • University of Warwick
    1
  • University of Cincinnati
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1