18 Works

Data from: Riverscape genetics identifies replicated ecological divergence across an Amazonian ecotone

Georgina Margaret Cooke, Erin L. Landguth & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Ecological speciation involves the evolution of reproductive isolation and niche divergence in the absence of a physical barrier to gene flow. The process is one of the most controversial topics of the speciation debate, particularly in tropical regions. Here, we investigate ecologically based divergence across an Amazonian ecotone in the electric fish, Steatogenys elegans. We combine phylogenetics, genome scans, and population genetics with a recently developed individual-based evolutionary landscape genetics approach that incorporates selection. This...

Data from: Divergence with gene flow in a population of thermophilic bacteria: a potential role for spatially varying selection

Christopher A. Wall, Gregory J. Koniges & Scott R. Miller
A fundamental goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how ecological diversity arises and is maintained in natural populations. We have investigated the contributions of gene flow and divergent selection to the distribution of genetic variation in an ecologically-differentiated population of a thermophilic cyanobacterium (Mastigocladus laminosus) found along the temperature gradient of a nitrogen-limited stream in Yellowstone National Park. For most loci sampled, gene flow appears to be sufficient to prevent substantial genetic divergence. However,...

Data from: Developmental stress increases reproductive success in male zebra finches

Ondi L. Crino, Colin T. Prather, Stephanie C. Driscoll, Jeffrey M. Good & Creagh W. Breuner
There is increasing evidence that exposure to stress during development can have sustained effects on animal phenotype and performance across life-history stages. For example, developmental stress has been shown to decrease the quality of sexually selected traits (e.g. bird song), and therefore is thought to decrease reproductive success. However, animals exposed to developmental stress may compensate for poor quality sexually selected traits by pursuing alternative reproductive tactics. Here, we examine the effects of developmental stress...

Data from: Insights into the development and evolution of exaggerated traits using de novo transcriptomes of two species of horned scarab beetles

Ian A. Warren, J. Cristobal Vera, Annika Johns, Robert Zinna, James H. Marden, Douglas J. Emlen, Ian Dworkin & Laura C. Lavine
Scarab beetles exhibit an astonishing variety of rigid exo-skeletal outgrowths, known as “horns”. These traits are often sexually dimorphic and vary dramatically across species in size, shape, location, and allometry with body size. In many species, the horn exhibits disproportionate growth resulting in an exaggerated allometric relationship with body size, as compared to other traits, such as wings, that grow proportionately with body size. Depending on the species, the smallest males either do not produce...

Data from: The hidden history of the snowshoe hare, Lepus americanus: extensive mitochondrial DNA introgression inferred from multilocus genetic variation

José Melo-Ferreira, Fernando A. Seixas, Ellen Cheng, L. Scott Mills & Paulo C. Alves
Hybridization drives the evolutionary trajectory of many species or local populations, and assessing the geographic extent and genetic impact of interspecific gene flow may provide invaluable clues to understand population divergence or the adaptive relevance of admixture. In North America, hares (Lepus spp.) are key species for ecosystem dynamics and their evolutionary history may have been affected by hybridization. Here we reconstructed the speciation history of the three most widespread hares in North America -...

Data from: Divergence-with-gene-flow within the recent chipmunk radiation (Tamias)

Jack Sullivan, John R. Demboski, Kayce C. Bell, Sarah Hird, Noah Reid, Brice Sarver & Jeffrey M. Good
Increasing data have supported the importance of divergence with gene flow (DGF) in the generation of biological diversity. In such cases, lineage divergence occurs on a shorter timescale than does the completion of reproductive isolation. Although it is critical to explore the mechanisms driving divergence and preventing homogenization by hybridization, it is equally important to document cases of DGF in nature. Here we synthesize data that have accumulated over the last dozen or so years...

Data from: Estimating occupancy using spatially and temporally replicated snow surveys

Jesse Whittington, Karsten Heuer, Bill Hunt, Mark Hebblewhite & Paul M. Lukacs
Occupancy modelling is increasingly used to monitor changes in the spatial distribution of rare and threatened species. Occupancy methods have traditionally relied on temporally replicated surveys to estimate detection probability. Recently, occupancy models with spatial replication have been used to estimate detection probabilities over large geographic areas that are difficult to survey repeatedly. We developed occupancy models that combine spatially and temporally replicated data and applied them to snow-tracking surveys of six species including wolverine...

Data from: Conservation implications of the evolutionary history and genetic diversity hotspots of the snowshoe hare

Ellen Cheng, Karen E. Hodges, José Melo-Ferreira, Paulo C. Alves & L. Scott Mills
With climate warming, the ranges of many boreal species are expected to shift northward and to fragment in southern peripheral ranges. To understand the conservation implications of losing southern populations, we examined range-wide genetic diversity of the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), an important prey species that drives boreal ecosystem dynamics. We analysed microsatellite (8 loci) and mitochondrial DNA sequence (cytochrome b and control region) variation in almost 1000 snowshoe hares. A hierarchical structure analysis of...

Data from: Evaluating the role of inbreeding depression in heterozygosity-fitness correlations: how useful are tests for identity disequilibrium?

Martin Kardos, Fred W. Allendorf, Gordon Luikart & Marty Kardos
Heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) have been observed for several decades, but their causes are often elusive. Tests for identity disequilibrium (ID, correlated heterozygosity between loci) are commonly used to determine if inbreeding depression is a possible cause of HFCs. We used computer simulations to determine how often ID is detected when HFCs are caused by inbreeding depression. We also used ID in conjunction with HFCs to estimate the proportion of variation (r2) in fitness explained by...

Data from: From baby birds to feathered dinosaurs incipient wings and the evolution of flight

Ashley M. Heers, Kenneth P. Dial & Bret W. Tobalske
Reconstructing the tree of life requires deciphering major evolutionary transformations and the functional capacities of fossils with “transitional” morphologies. Some of the most iconic, well-studied fossils with transitional features are theropod dinosaurs, whose skeletons and feathered forelimbs record the origin and evolution of bird flight. However, in spite of over a century of discussion, the functions of forelimb feathers during the evolution of flight remain enigmatic. Both aerodynamic and non-aerodynamic roles have been proposed, but...

Data from: Effect of microsatellite selection on individual and population genetic inferences: an empirical study using cross-specific and species-specific amplifications

Joao Queiros, Raquel Godinho, Susana Lopes, Christian Gortazar, Jose De La Fuente & Paulo C. Alves
Although whole-genome sequencing is becoming more accessible and feasible for nonmodel organisms, microsatellites have remained the markers of choice for various population and conservation genetic studies. However, the criteria for choosing microsatellites are still controversial due to ascertainment bias that may be introduced into the genetic inference. An empirical study of red deer (Cervus elaphus) populations, in which cross-specific and species-specific microsatellites developed through pyrosequencing of enriched libraries, was performed for this study. Two different...

Data from: Chromosomal rearrangements directly cause underdominant F1 pollen sterility in Mimulus lewisii-M. cardinalis hybrids

Angela Stathos & Lila Fishman
Chromosomal rearrangements can contribute to the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation directly, by disrupting meiosis in F1 hybrids, or indirectly, by suppressing recombination among genic incompatibilities. Because direct effects of rearrangements on fertility imply fitness costs during their spread, understanding the mechanism of F1 hybrid sterility is integral to reconstructing the role(s) of rearrangements in speciation. In hybrids between monkeyflowers Mimulus cardinalis and M. lewisii, rearrangements contain all quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both premating...

Data from: Genetic identification of endangered North African ungulates using noninvasive sampling

Teresa Luísa Silva, Raquel Godinho, Diana Castro, Teresa Abáigar, José Carlos Brito & Paulo Célio Alves
North African ungulates include several threatened and emblematic species, yet are poorly studied mainly due to their remoteness and elusiveness. Noninvasive sampling provides a useful approach to obtain ecological and genetic information essential to guide conservation actions. The very first and most important step in conservation planning is to accurately identify species, and molecular genetics has been proved to be a useful tool. Several molecular genetics protocols are available for species identification, even for samples...

Data from: Consequences of habitat change and resource selection specialization for population limitation in cavity-nesting birds

Thomas E. Martin
Resource selection specialization may increase vulnerability of populations to environmental change. One environmental change that may negatively impact some populations is the broad decline of quaking aspen Populus tremuloides, a preferred nest tree of cavity-nesting organisms who are commonly limited by nest-site availability. However, the long-term consequences of this habitat change for cavity-nesting bird populations are poorly studied. I counted densities of woody plants and eight cavity-nesting bird species over 29 years in 15 high...

Data from: Dispersal and selection mediate hybridization between a native and invasive species

Ryan P. Kovach, Clint C. Muhlfeld, Matthew C. Boyer, Winsor H. Lowe, Fred W. Allendorf & Gordon Luikart
Hybridization between native and non-native species has serious biological consequences, but our understanding of how dispersal and selection interact to influence invasive hybridization is limited. Here, we document the spread of genetic introgression between a native (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and invasive (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout, and identify the mechanisms influencing genetic admixture. In two populations inhabiting contrasting environments, non-native admixture increased rapidly from 1984 to 2007 and was driven by surprisingly consistent processes. Individual admixture was related...

Data from: Distance, flow, and PCR inhibition: eDNA dynamics in two headwater steams

Stephen F. Jane, Taylor M. Wilcox, Kevin S. McKelvey, Michael K. Young, Michael K. Schwartz, Winsor H. Lowe, Benjamin H. Letcher & Andrew R. Whiteley
Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic organisms, but much remains unknown about the dynamics of aquatic eDNA over a range of environmental conditions. DNA concentrations in streams and rivers will depend not only on the equilibrium between DNA entering the water and DNA leaving the system through degradation, but also on downstream transport. To improve understanding of the dynamics of eDNA concentration in lotic systems, we introduced caged...

Data from: Riverscape genetics identifies replicated ecological divergence across an Amazonian ecotone

Georgina M. Cooke, Erin L. Landguth & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Ecological speciation involves the evolution of reproductive isolation and niche divergence in the absence of a physical barrier to gene flow. The process is one of the most controversial topics of the speciation debate, particularly in tropical regions. Here, we investigate ecologically based divergence across an Amazonian ecotone in the electric fish, Steatogenys elegans. We combine phylogenetics, genome scans and population genetics with a recently developed individual-based evolutionary landscape genetics approach that incorporates selection. This...

Data from: Parent-of-origin growth effects and the evolution of hybrid inviability in dwarf hamsters

Thomas David Brekke & Jeffrey M. Good
Mammalian hybrids often show abnormal growth, indicating that developmental inviability may play an important role in mammalian speciation. Yet, it is unclear if this recurrent phenotype reflects a common genetic basis. Here, we describe extreme parent-of-origin-dependent growth in hybrids from crosses between two species of dwarf hamsters, Phodopus campbelli and Phodopus sungorus. One cross type resulted in massive placental and embryonic overgrowth, severe developmental defects, and maternal death. Embryos from the reciprocal cross were viable...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • University of Montana
    18
  • University of Porto
    4
  • Macquarie University
    3
  • North Carolina State University
    2
  • Denver Museum of Nature and Science
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • Parks Canada
    1
  • Oklahoma State University
    1
  • Flinders University
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1