28 Works

Data from: Modeling multilocus selection in an individual-based, spatially-explicit landscape genetics framework

Erin Landguth, Brenna R. Forester, Andrew J. Eckert, Andrew J. Shirk, Mitra Menon, Amy Whipple, Casey C. Day & Samuel A. Cushman
We implemented multilocus selection in a spatially-explicit, individual-based framework that enables multivariate environmental gradients to drive selection in many loci as a new module for the landscape genetics programs, CDPOP and CDMetaPOP. Our module simulates multilocus selection using a linear additive model, providing a flexible platform to evaluate a wide range of genotype-environment associations. Importantly, the module allows simulation of selection in any number of loci under the influence of any number of environmental variables....

Transcriptomic regulation of seasonal coat color change in hares

Mafalda Sousa Ferreira, Paulo Célio Alves, Colin M. Callahan, Iwona Giska, Liliana Farelo, Hannes Jenny, L. Scott Mills, Klaus Hackländer, Jeffrey M. Good & José Melo-Ferreira
Color molts from summer brown to winter white coats have evolved in several species to maintain camouflage year-round in environments with seasonal snow. Despite the eco-evolutionary relevance of this key phenological adaptation, its molecular regulation has only recently begun to be addressed. Here, we analyze skin transcription changes during the autumn molt of the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) and integrate the results with an established model of gene regulation across the spring molt of the...

Data from: Desiccation and rehydration of mosses greatly increases resource fluxes that alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling

Mandy L. Slate, Benjamin W. Sullivan & Ray M. Callaway
1. Mosses often have positive effects on soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, but we know little about how environmentally determined cycles of desiccation and rehydration in mosses influence these processes. 2. In this context, we compared carbon and nitrogen in throughfall after precipitation passed through eight moss species that were either hydrated continuously or desiccated and rehydrated. Also, the throughfall of four moss species was added to soil and used to determine the net effect...

Data from: Competition and specialization in an African forest carnivore community

David Mills, Emmanuel Do Linh San, Hugh Robinson, Sam Isoke, Rob Slotow & Luke Hunter
Globally, human activities have led to the impoverishment of species assemblages and the disruption of ecosystem function. Determining whether this poses a threat to future ecosystem stability necessitates a thorough understanding of mechanisms underpinning community assembly and niche selection. Here, we tested for niche segregation within an African small carnivore community in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We used occupancy modelling based on systematic camera trap surveys and fine-scale habitat measures, to identify opposing preferences between...

Data from: Native forage mediates influence of irrigated agriculture on migratory behavior of elk

Kristin J. Barker, Michael S. Mitchell & Kelly M. Proffitt
1. Ungulates migrate to maximize nutritional intake when forage varies seasonally. Populations of ungulates often include both migratory and non-migratory individuals, but the mechanisms driving individual differences in migratory behavior are not well-understood. 2. We quantified associations between hypothesized drivers of partial migration and the likelihood of migration for individual ungulates that experienced a range of environmental conditions and anthropogenic influences. 3. We evaluated the effects of forage variation, conspecific density, and human land uses...

Data from: Forest succession and climate variability interacted to control fire activity over the last four centuries in an Alaskan boreal landscape

Tyler J. Hoecker & Philip E. Higuera
Context: The boreal forest is globally important for its influence on Earth’s energy balance, and its sensitivity to climate change. Ecosystem functioning in boreal forests is shaped by fire activity, so anticipating the impacts of climate change requires understanding the precedence for, and consequences of, climatically induced changes in fire regimes. Long-term records of climate, fire, and vegetation are critical for gaining this understanding. Objectives: We investigated the relative importance of climate and landscape flammability...

Data from: Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and America

Duncan N. L. Menge, Ryan A. Chisholm, Stuart J. Davies, Kamariah Abu Salim, David Allen, Mauricio Alvarez, Norm Bourg, Warren Y. Brockelman, Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, Nathalie Butt, Min Cao, Wirong Chanthorn, Wei-Chun Chao, Keith Clay, Richard Condit, Susan Cordell, João Batista Da Silva, H. S. Dattaraja, Ana Cristina Segalin De Andrade, Alexandre A. Oliveira, Jan Den Ouden, Michael Drescher, Christine Fletcher, Christian P. Giardina, C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke … & Tak Fung
Symbiotic nitrogen (N)‐fixing trees can provide large quantities of new N to ecosystems, but only if they are sufficiently abundant. The overall abundance and latitudinal abundance distributions of N‐fixing trees are well characterised in the Americas, but less well outside the Americas. Here, we characterised the abundance of N‐fixing trees in a network of forest plots spanning five continents, ~5,000 tree species and ~4 million trees. The majority of the plots (86%) were in America...

Data from: Integrating spatial structure and interspecific and intraspecific plant–soil feedback effects and responses into community structure

Sa Xiao, Dan Z. Atwater & Ragan M. Callaway
Plant-soil feedbacks have important effects on plant communities, but most theory has been derived from experiments on intraspecific plant-soil feedbacks. Much less is known about how interspecific plant-soil feedbacks affect coexistence and plant communities, due in part to experimental and analytical challenges. Here, we propose a framework for evaluating plant-soil feedbacks among multiple interacting species that incorporates 1) the average effect each species has on conspecific and heterospecific neighbors via how they modify soil biota,...

Data from: Weak spatiotemporal response of prey to predation risk in a freely interacting system

Jeremy J. Cusack, Michel T. Kohl, Matthew C. Metz, Tim Coulson, Daniel R. Stahler, Douglas W. Smith & Daniel R. MacNulty
1.The extent to which prey space use actively minimises predation risk continues to ignite controversy. Methodological reasons that have hindered consensus include inconsistent measurements of predation risk, biased spatiotemporal scales at which responses are measured, and lack of robust null expectations. 2.We addressed all three challenges in a comprehensive analysis of the spatiotemporal responses of adult female elk (Cervus elaphus) to the risk of predation by grey wolves (Canis lupus) during winter in northern Yellowstone,...

Data from: Climate outweighs native vs. non-native range-effects for genetics and common garden performance of a cosmopolitan weed

Christoph Rosche, Isabell Hensen, Adrian Schaar, Uzma Zehra, Marie Jasieniuk, Ragan M. Callaway, Damase P. Khasa, Mohammad M. Al-Gharaibeh, Ylva Lekberg, David U. Nagy, Robert W. Pal, Miki Okada, Karin Schrieber, Kathryn G. Turner, Susanne Lachmuth, Andrey Erst, Tomonori Tsunoda, Min Sheng, Robin Schmidt, Yanling Peng, Wenbo Luo, Yun Jäschke, Zafar A. Reshi & Manzoor A. Shah
Comparing genetic diversity, genetic differentiation and performance between native and non-native populations has advanced our knowledge of contemporary evolution and its ecological consequences. However, such between-range comparisons can be complicated by high among-population variation within native and non-native ranges. For example, native vs. non-native comparisons between small and non-representative subsets of populations for species with very large distributions have the potential to mislead because they may not sufficiently account for within-range adaptation to climatic conditions,...

Winter damage is more important than summer temperature for maintaining the krummholz growth form above alpine treeline

Colin T. Maher, Cara R. Nelson & Andrew J. Larson
1. Understanding the processes that control alpine treelines, the elevational limits of tree growth forms, has been a central question in ecology and is growing in importance with concern over climate change. Cool summer air temperatures are currently thought to be the ultimate limiter of upright tree growth at alpine treelines globally. However, winter damage has long been recognized as a shaping force near alpine treelines. Low-growing krummholz growth forms provide an opportunity to test...

Data from: The laboratory domestication of zebrafish: from diverse populations to inbred substrains

Jaanus Suurväli, Andrew R. Whiteley, Yichen Zheng, Karim Gharbi, Maria Leptin & Thomas Wiehe
We know from human genetic studies that practically all aspects of biology are strongly influenced by the genetic background, as reflected in the advent of ‘personalized medicine’. Yet, with few exceptions, this is not taken into account when using laboratory populations as animal model systems for research in these fields. Laboratory strains of zebrafish (Danio rerio) are widely used for research in vertebrate developmental biology, behaviour and physiology, for modelling diseases, and for testing pharmaceutic...

Data from: Tracing the footprints of a moving hybrid zone under a demographic history of speciation with gene flow

Mitra Menon, Erin Landguth, Alejandro Leal-Saenz, Justin Bagley, Anna Schoettle, Christian Wehenkel, Lluvia Flores-Renteria, Sam Cushman, Kristen Waring & Andrew Eckert
A lack of optimal gene combinations, as well as low levels of genetic diversity are often associated with the formation of species range margins. Conservation efforts rely on predictive modelling using abiotic variables and assessments of genetic diversity to determine target species and populations for controlled breeding, germplasm conservation and assisted migration. Biotic factors such as interspecific competition and hybridization, however, are largely ignored, despite their prevalence across diverse taxa and their role as key...

Data from: Patterns of rangeland productivity and land ownership: implications for conservation and management

Nathaniel P. Robinson, Brady W. Allred, David E. Naugle & Matthew O. Jones
Rangelands cover 40-50% of the earth’s terrestrial surface. While often characterized by limited, yet variable resource availability, rangelands are vital for humans, providing numerous ecosystem goods and services. In the conterminous United States (CONUS) the dominant component of rangeland conservation is a network of public rangelands, concentrated in the west. Public rangelands are interspersed with private and tribal rangelands resulting in a complex mosaic of land tenure and management priorities. We quantify ownership patterns of...

Data from: Does vegetation change over 28 years affect habitat use and reproductive success?

Karolina Fierro-Calderon & Tom Martin
Individuals should prefer and use habitats that confer high fitness, but habitat use is not always adaptive. Vegetation in natural landscapes changes gradually and the ability of species to adaptively adjust their habitat use to long-term changes is largely unstudied. We studied nest patch and territory use over 28 years in Orange-crowned Warblers (Oreothlypis celata) in a system that has undergone natural long-term changes in vegetation. Abundance of maple (Acer grandidentatum), its preferred nesting habitat,...

Larger body size and earlier run timing increase alewife reproductive success in a whole lake experiment

Meghna Marjadi, Allison Roy, Adrian Jordaan & Andrew Whiteley
Environmental conditions can influence biological characteristics, such as phenology and body size, with important consequences for organismal fitness. Examining these fitness consequences under natural conditions through genetic pedigree reconstruction offers a lens into potential population responses to changing environments. Over 3 years (2013–2015), we introduced adult alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), anadromous, iteroparous clupeids, into one Massachusetts (USA) lake to complete the first detailed examination of this species’ mating system and assess relationships among body size, reproductive...

Data from: Migrating bison engineer the green wave

Chris Geremia, Jerod Merkle, Daniel Eacker, Rick Wallen, P.J. White, Mark Hebblewhite & Matthew Kauffman
Newly emerging plants provide the best forage for herbivores. To exploit this fleeting resource, migrating herbivores align their movements to surf the wave of spring green-up. With new technology to track migrating animals, the Green Wave Hypothesis has steadily gained empirical support across a diversity of migratory taxa. This hypothesis assumes the green wave is controlled by variation in climate, weather, and topography, and its progression dictates the timing, pace, and extent of migrations. However,...

Genomic data reveal similar genetic differentiation in aquifer species with different dispersal capabilities and life histories

Steve Jordan, Brian Hand, Scott Hotaling, Amanda DelVecchia, Rachel Malison, Clark Nissley, Gordon Luikart & Jack Standford
Little is known about the life histories, genetic structure, and population connectivity of shallow groundwater organisms. We used next-generation sequencing (RAD-seq) to analyze population genomic structure in two aquifer species: Paraperla frontalis (Banks, 1902), a stonefly with groundwater larvae and aerial (winged) adults, and Stygobromus sp., a groundwater-obligate amphipod. We found similar genetic differentiation in each species between floodplains separated by ~70 river km in the Flathead River basin of NW Montana, USA. Given that...

Data from: Climate will increasingly determine post-fire tree regeneration success in low-elevation forests, Northern Rockies, USA

Kerry B. Kemp, Philip E. Higuera, Penelope Morgan & John T. Abatzoglou
Climate change is expected to cause widespread shifts in the distribution and abundance of plant species through direct impacts on mortality, regeneration, and survival. At landscape scales, climate impacts will be strongly mediated by disturbances, such as wildfire, which catalyze shifts in species distributions through widespread mortality and by shaping the post‐disturbance environment. We examined the potential for regional shifts in low‐elevation tree species in response to wildfire and climate warming in low‐elevation, dry mixed‐conifer...

Data from: Impacts of growing-season climate on tree growth and post-fire regeneration in ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir forests

Lacey E. Hankin, Philip E. Higuera, Kimberley T. Davis & Solomon Z. Dobrowski
We studied the impacts of climate variability on low-elevation forests in the U.S. northern Rocky Mountains by quantifying how post-fire tree regeneration and radial growth varied with growing-season climate. We reconstructed post-fire regeneration and radial growth rates of Pinus ponderosa and Pseudotsuga menziesii at 33 sites that burned between 1992 and 2007, by aging seedlings at the root-shoot boundary. We also measured radial growth in adult trees from 12 additional sites that burned between 1900...

Data from: Loss of cytoplasmic incompatibility and minimal fecundity effects explain relatively low Wolbachia frequencies in Drosophila mauritiana

Megan K. Meany, William R. Conner, Sophia V. Richter, Jessica A. Bailey, Michael Turelli & Brandon S. Cooper
Maternally transmitted Wolbachia bacteria infect about half of all insect species. Many Wolbachia cause cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), reduced egg hatch when uninfected females mate with infected males. Although CI produces a frequency-dependent fitness advantage that leads to high equilibrium Wolbachia frequencies, it does not aid Wolbachia spread from low frequencies. Indeed, the fitness advantages that produce initial Wolbachia spread and maintain non-CI Wolbachia remain elusive. wMau Wolbachia infecting Drosophila mauritiana do not cause CI, despite...

Data from: De novo origins of multicellularity in response to predation

Matthew D. Herron, Joshua M. Borin, Jacob C. Boswell, Jillian Walker, I-Chen Kimberly Chen, Charles A. Knox, Margrethe Boyd, Frank Rosenzweig & William C. Ratcliff
The transition from unicellular to multicellular life was one of a few major events in the history of life that created new opportunities for more complex biological systems to evolve. Predation is hypothesized as one selective pressure that may have driven the evolution of multicellularity. Here we show that de novo origins of simple multicellularity can evolve in response to predation. We subjected outcrossed populations of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to selection by...

Data from: Consequences of climatic thresholds for projecting fire activity and ecological change

Adam M. Young, Philip E. Higuera, John T. Abatzoglou, Paul A. Duffy & Feng Sheng Hu
Aim: Ecological properties governed by threshold relationships can exhibit heightened sensitivity to climate, creating an inherent source of uncertainty when anticipating future change. We investigated the impact of threshold relationships on our ability to project ecological change outside the observational record (e.g., the 21st century), using the challenge of predicting late‐Holocene fire regimes in boreal forest and tundra ecosystems. Location: Boreal forest and tundra ecosystems of Alaska. Time period: 850–2100 CE. Major taxa studied: Not...

Wildfires and climate change push low-elevation forests across a critical climate threshold for tree regeneration

Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Philip E. Higuera, Zachary A. Holden, Thomas T. Veblen, Monica T. Rother, Sean A. Parks, Anna Sala & Marco P. Maneta
Climate change is increasing fire activity in the western United States, which has the potential to accelerate climate-induced shifts in vegetation communities. Wildfire can catalyze vegetation change by killing adult trees that could otherwise persist in climate conditions no longer suitable for seedling establishment and survival. Recently documented declines in postfire conifer recruitment in the western United States may be an example of this phenomenon. However, the role of annual climate variation and its interaction...

Data from: Biotic interactions help explain variation in elevational range limits of birds among Bornean mountains

Ryan C. Burner, Andy J Boyce, Alison Styring, Tom Martin & Frederick Sheldon
Aim Physiological tolerances and biotic interactions along habitat gradients are thought to influence species occurrence. Distributional differences caused by such forces are particularly noticeable on tropical mountains, where high species turnover along elevational gradients occurs over relatively short distances and elevational distributions of particular species can shift among mountains. Such shifts are interpreted as evidence of the importance of spatial variation in interspecific competition and habitat or climatic gradients. To assess the relative importance of...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    28

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28

Affiliations

  • University of Montana
    28
  • Utah State University
    3
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Nevada Reno
    2
  • Northern Arizona University
    2
  • Virginia Commonwealth University
    2
  • University of Idaho
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Rocky Mountain Research Station
    2