4 Works

Data from: A public database of memory and naive B-cell receptor sequences

William S. DeWitt, Paul Lindau, Thomas M. Snyder, Anna M. Sherwood, Marissa Vignali, Christopher S. Carlson, Philip D. Greenberg, Natalie Duerkopp, Ryan O. Emerson & Harlan S. Robins
The vast diversity of B-cell receptors (BCR) and secreted antibodies enables the recognition of, and response to, a wide range of epitopes, but this diversity has also limited our understanding of humoral immunity. We present a public database of more than 37 million unique BCR sequences from three healthy adult donors that is many fold deeper than any existing resource, together with a set of online tools designed to facilitate the visualization and analysis of...

Data from: Consistency of VDJ rearrangement and substitution parameters enables accurate B cell receptor sequence annotation

Duncan K. Ralph, & Frederick A. Matsen
VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D,...

Data from: Developmental mechanisms of stripe patterns in rodents

Ricardo Mallarino, Corneliu Henegar, Mercedes Mirasierra, Marie Manceau, Carsten Schradin, Mario Vallejo, Slobodan Beronja, Gregory S. Barsh & Hopi E. Hoekstra
Mammalian colour patterns are among the most recognizable characteristics found in nature and can have a profound impact on fitness. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and subsequent evolution of these patterns. Here we show that, in the African striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio), periodic dorsal stripes result from underlying differences in melanocyte maturation, which give rise to spatial variation in hair colour. We identify the transcription factor ALX3 as a regulator...

Data from: Sensory trait variation contributes to biased dispersal of threespine stickleback in flowing water

Yuexin Jiang, Catherine L. Peichel, Fei Ling, Daniel I. Bolnick, Z. Rizvi, S. Thompson, V. V. Palivela & L. Torrance
Gene flow is widely thought to homogenize spatially separate populations, eroding effects of divergent selection. The resulting theory of ‘migration-selection balance’ is predicated on a common assumption that all genotypes are equally prone to dispersal. If instead certain genotypes are disproportionately likely to disperse, then migration can actually promote population divergence. For example, previous work has shown that threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) differ in their propensity to move up- or down-stream (‘rheotactic response’), which may...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
    4
  • North West Agriculture and Forestry University
    1
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Texas A&M University
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Spanish National Research Council
    1
  • Collège de France
    1
  • HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
    1