3 Works

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Metabolic costs imposed by hydrostatic pressure constrain bathymetric range in the lithodid crab Lithodes maja

Alastair Brown, Sven Thatje, James P. Morris, Andrew Oliphant, Elizabeth A. Morgan, Chris Hauton, Daniel O. B. Jones & David W. Pond
Changing climate is shifting the distributions of marine species, yet the potential for shifts in depth distributions is virtually unexplored. Hydrostatic pressure is proposed to contribute to a physiological bottleneck constraining depth range extension in shallow-water taxa. However, bathymetric limitation by hydrostatic pressure remains undemonstrated, and the mechanism limiting hyperbaric tolerance remains hypothetical. Here, we assess the effects of hydrostatic pressure in the lithodid crab Lithodes maja (bathymetric range 4-790 m depth, approximately equivalent to...

Data from: Genetic structure of coral-Symbiodinium symbioses on the world’s warmest reefs

Edward G. Smith, Benjamin C. C. Hume, Patrice Delaney, Jörg Wiedenmann & John A. Burt
Corals in the Arabian/Persian Gulf (PAG) survive extreme sea temperatures (summer mean: >34°C), and it is unclear whether these corals have genetically adapted or physiologically acclimated to these conditions. In order to elucidate the processes involved in the thermal tolerance of PAG corals, it is essential to understand the connectivity between reefs within and outside of the PAG. To this end, this study set out to investigate the genetic structure of the coral, Platygyra daedalea,...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • National Oceanography Centre
    3
  • University of Southampton
    2
  • New York University Abu Dhabi
    1
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    1
  • Spanish Institute of Oceanography
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Cape Eleuthera Institute
    1
  • Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1
  • University of Namibia
    1