9 Works

Data from: The role of continental shelf width in determining freshwater phylogeographic patterns in southeastern Australian pygmy perches (Teleostei: Percichthyidae)

Peter J. Unmack, Michael P. Hammer, Mark Adams, Jerald B. Johnson & Thomas E. Dowling
Biogeographic patterns displayed by obligate freshwater organisms are intimately related to the nature and extent of connectivity between suitable habitats. Two of the more significant barriers to freshwater connections are seawater and major drainage divides. South-eastern Australia provides a contrast between these barriers as it has discrete areas that are likely influenced to a greater or lesser extent by each barrier type. We use continental shelf width as a proxy for the potential degree of...

Data from: Historical stocking data and 19th century DNA reveal human-induced changes to native diversity and distribution of cutthroat trout

Jessica L. Metcalf, Sierra L. Love Stowell, Christopher M. Kennedy, Kevin B. Rogers, Daniel McDonald, Kyle Keepers, Janet Epp, Alan Cooper, Jeremy J. Austin & Andrew P. Martin
Many species are threatened with extinction and efforts are underway worldwide to restore imperiled species to their native ranges. Restoration requires knowledge of species’ historic diversity and distribution, which may not be available. For some species, many populations were extirpated and humans moved individuals beyond their native range before native diversity and distribution were documented. Moreover, traditional taxonomic assessments often failed to accurately capture phylogenetic diversity. We illustrate a general approach for estimating regional native...

Data from: Optimum design of family structure and allocation of resources in association mapping with lines from multiple crosses

Wenxin Liu, Hans Peter Maurer, Jochen C. Reif, Albrecht E. Melchinger, H. F. Utz, Nicolas Ranc, Giovanni Della Porta, Matthew R. Tucker & Tobias Würschum
Family mapping is based on multiple segregating families and is becoming increasingly popular due to advantages over population mapping. Though much progress has been made recently, the optimum design and allocation of resources for family mapping remains unclear. Here, we addressed these issues using a simulation study, resample model averaging and cross-validation approaches. Our results show that in family mapping, the predictive power and the accuracy of QTL detection depend greatly on the population size...

Data from: Breakdown of phylogenetic signal: a survey of microsatellite densities in 454 shotgun sequences from 154 non model eukaryote species

Emese Meglécz, Gabriel Nève, Ed Biffin & Michael G. Gardner
Microsatellites are ubiquitous in Eukaryotic genomes. A more complete understanding of their origin and spread can be gained from a comparison of their distribution within a phylogenetic context. Although information for model species is accumulating rapidly, it is insufficient due to a lack of species depth, thus intragroup variation is necessarily ignored. As such, apparent differences between groups may be overinflated and generalizations cannot be inferred until an analysis of the variation that exists within...

Data from: Pollen diversity matters: revealing the neglected effect of pollen diversity on fitness in fragmented landscapes

Martin F. Breed, Maria H. K. Marklund, Kym M. Ottewell, Michael G. Gardner, J. Berton C. Harris & Andrew J. Lowe
Few studies have documented the impacts of habitat fragmentation on plant mating patterns together with fitness. Yet, these processes require urgent attention to better understand the impact of contemporary landscape change on biodiversity and for guiding native plant genetic resource management. We examined these relationships using the predominantly insect-pollinated Eucalyptus socialis. Progeny were collected from trees located in three increasingly disturbed landscapes in southern Australia and were planted out in common garden experiments. We show...

Data from: Molecular patterns of introgression in a classic hybrid zone between the Australian tree frogs, Litoria ewingii and L. paraewingi: Evidence of a tension zone

Katie L. Smith, Joshua M. Hale, Michael R. Kearney, Jeremy J. Austin & Jane Melville
Hybrid zones provide a rare opportunity to explore the processes involved in reproductive isolation and speciation. The southern hybrid zone between the southeastern Australian tree frogs Litoria ewingii and L. paraewingi has been comprehensively studied over the last 40 years, primarily using reproductive compatibility experiments and male advertisement calls. We used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and eight nuclear microsatellite markers to characterize this hybrid zone along a historically studied transect and to test various dispersal-dependent and...

Data from: Antibody selection and amino acid reversions

Jack Da Silva
Pathogens adapt to antibody surveillance through amino acid replacements in targeted protein regions, or epitopes, that interfere with antibody binding. However, such escape mutations may exact a fitness cost due to impaired protein function. Here, it is hypothesised that the recurring generation of specific neutralising antibodies to an epitope region as it evolves in response to antibody selection will cause amino acid reversions by releasing early escape mutations from immune selection. The plausibility of this...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of the Australian freshwater fish genus Galaxiella, with an emphasis on dwarf Galaxias (G. pusilla)

Peter J. Unmack, Justin C. Bagley, Mark Adams, Michael P. Hammer & Jerald B. Johnson
The freshwater fauna of Southern Australia is primarily restricted to the southwestern and southeastern corners of the continent, and is separated by a large, arid region that is inhospitable to this biota. This geographic phenomenon has attracted considerable interest from biogeographers looking to explain evolutionary diversification in this region. Here, we employed phylogenetic and phylogeographic approaches to evaluate the effect of this barrier on a group of four galaxiid fish species (Galaxiella) endemic to temperate...

Data from: Morphological differentiation correlates with ecological but not genetic divergence in a Gehyra gecko.

Mark Sistrom, Danielle L. Edwards, Mark Hutchinson & Stephen Donnellan
Body size affects life history, the ecological niche of an organism and its interactions with other organisms. Resultantly, marked differences in body size between related organisms are often an indication of a species boundary. This is particularly evident in the Gehyra variegata species complex of geckos, which displays differential body sizes between genetically divergent species, but high levels of intra-specific morphological conservatism. We report on a Gehyra population that displays extraordinary body size differentiation in...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Adelaide
    9
  • South Australian Museum
    3
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    2
  • Brigham Young University
    2
  • University of Hohenheim
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • Flinders University
    1
  • State Herbarium of South Australia
    1
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    1