13 Works

Data from: Mating patterns and pollinator mobility are critical traits in forest fragmentation genetics

Martin F. Breed, Kym M. Ottewell, Michael G. Gardner, Maria H. K. Marklund, Eleanor E. Dormontt & Andrew J. Lowe
Most woody plants are animal-pollinated, but the global problem of habitat fragmentation is changing the pollination dynamics. Consequently, the genetic diversity and fitness of the progeny of animal-pollinated woody plants sired in fragmented landscapes tend to decline due to shifts in plant-mating patterns (for example, reduced outcrossing rate, pollen diversity). However, the magnitude of this mating-pattern shift should theoretically be a function of pollinator mobility. We first test this hypothesis by exploring the mating patterns...

Data from: Fifty thousand years of arctic vegetation and megafaunal diet

Eske Willerslev, John Davison, Mari Moora, Martin Zobel, Eric Coissac, Mary E. Edwards, Eline D. Lorenzen, Mette Vestergård, Galina Gussarova, James Haile, Joseph Craine, Gaddy Bergmann, Ludovic Gielly, Sanne Boessenkool, Laura S. Epp, Peter B. Pearman, Rachid Cheddadi, David Murray, Karri Anne Bråthen, Nigel Yoccoz, Heather Binney, Corinne Cruaud, Patrick Wincker, Tomasz Goslar, Inger Greve Alsos … & Pierre Taberlet
Although it is generally agreed that the arctic flora is among the youngest and least diverse on Earth, the processes that shaped it are poorly understood. Here we present 50 thousand years (kyr) of arctic vegetation history, derived from the first large-scale ancient DNA metabarcoding study of circumpolar plant diversity. For this interval we additionally explore nematode diversity as a proxy for modelling vegetation cover and soil quality, and diets of herbivorous megafaunal mammals, many...

Data from: Fine-scale diet of the Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) using DNA-based analysis of faeces.

Kristian J. Peters, Kathy Ophelkeller, Nathan J. Bott, Bruce E. Deagle, Simon N. Jarman & Simon D. Goldsworthy
We applied DNA-based faecal analysis to determine the diet of female Australian sea lions (n = 12) from two breeding colonies in South Australia. DNA dietary components of fish and cephalopods were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and mitochondrial DNA primers targeting the short (~100 base pair) section of the 16S gene region. Prey diversity was determined by sequencing ~50 amplicons generated from clone libraries developed for each individual. Faecal DNA was also combined...

Data from: Delimiting species in recent radiations with low levels of morphological divergence: a case study in Australian Gehyra geckos

Mark J. Sistrom, Steve Donnellan, Mark Hutchinson, Mark Sistrom, Steve C. Donnellan & Mark N. Hutchinson
Recent conceptual and methodological advances have increased the ability to apply multifaceted approaches to species delimitation, which is particularly useful in delimiting recently diversified species where single lines of evidence lead to incorrect species delimitation or assignment of individuals to species (e.g. cryptic, morphological species and paraphyletic, hybridizing species). Species of the Australian Gehyra gecko radiation have historically proven difficult to delimit due the group’s uniform, almost continent-wide geographic distribution and conservative morphology, contrasting high...

Data from: Spatio-temporal changes in the structure of an Australian frog hybrid zone: a 40 year perspective

Katie Louise Smith, Joshua Miles Hale, Laurène Gay, Michael R. Kearney, Jeremy J. Austin, Kirsten M. Parris, Jane Melville & Michael Kearney
Spatio-temporal studies of hybrid zones provide an opportunity to test evolutionary hypotheses of hybrid zone maintenance and movement. We conducted a landscape genetics study on a classic hybrid zone of the south-eastern Australian frogs, Litoria ewingii and L. paraewingi. This hybrid zone has been comprehensively studied since the 1960s, providing the unique opportunity to directly assess changes in hybrid zone structure across time. We compared both mtDNA and male advertisement call data from two time...

Data from: The role of gravity in the evolution of mammalian blood pressure

Craig R. White & Roger S. Seymour
Understanding of the factors involved in determining the level of central arterial blood pressure in mammals has been clouded by inappropriate allometric analyses that fail to account for phylogenetic relationships among species, and require pressure to approach 0 as body size decreases. The present study analyses systolic, mean arterial, and diastolic blood pressure in 47 species of mammal with phylogenetically informed techniques applied to two-parameter equations. It also sets nonlinear, three-parameter equations to the data...

Data from: Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours

Beata Ujvari, Anne-Maree Pearse, Kate Swift, Pamela Hodson, Bobby Hua, Stephen Pyecroft, Robyn Taylor, Rodrigo Hamede, Menna Jones, Kathy Belov, Thomas Madsen & Katherine Belov
The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the long-term effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on cancer evolution. Since first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by >90%. So far, four chromosomal DFTD variants (strains) have been described and karyotypic analyses of 253 tumours showed higher levels of tetraploidy in the oldest strain. We propose that increased ploidy in the oldest strain may have...

Data from: Recent rapid speciation and ecomorph divergence in Indo-Australian sea snakes

Kate L. Sanders, Arne R. Rasmussen, , Johan Elmberg, Anslem De Silva, Michael L. Guinea, Michael S.Y. Lee & Michael S. Y. Lee
The viviparous sea snakes (Hydrophiinae) are a young radiation of at least 62 species that display spectacular morphological diversity and high levels of local sympatry. To shed light on the mechanisms underlying sea snake diversification, we investigated recent speciation and eco-morphological differentiation in a clade of four nominal species with overlapping ranges in Southeast Asia and Australia. Analyses of morphology and stomach contents identified the presence of two distinct ecomorphs: a ‘macrocephalic’ ecomorph that reaches...

Data from: Genomic evidence for the parallel evolution of coastal forms in the Senecio lautus complex

Federico Roda, Luke Ambrose, Gregory M. Walter, Huanle L. Liu, Andrea Schaul, Andrew Lowe, Pieter B. Pelser, Peter Prentis, Loren H. Rieseberg & Daniel Ortiz-Barrientos
Instances of parallel ecotypic divergence where adaptation to similar conditions repeatedly cause similar phenotypic changes in closely related organisms are useful for studying the role of ecological selection in speciation. Here we used a combination of traditional and next generation genotyping techniques to test for the parallel divergence of plants from the Senecio lautus complex, a phenotypically variable groundsel that has adapted to disparate environments in the South Pacific. Phylogenetic analysis of a broad selection...

Data from: Pollen flow in fragmented landscapes maintains genetic diversity following stand-replacing disturbance in a neotropical pioneer tree, Vochysia ferruginea Mart.

Andrew J. Lowe, Sam J. Davies, Stephen Cavers, Bryan Finegan, Andrew White & Martin F. Breed
In forests with gap disturbance regimes, pioneer tree regeneration is typically abundant following stand-replacing disturbances, whether natural or anthropogenic. Differences in pioneer tree density linked to disturbance regime can influence pollinator behaviour and impact on mating patterns and genetic diversity of pioneer populations. Such mating pattern shifts can manifest as higher selfing rates and lower pollen diversity in old growth forest populations. In secondary forest, where more closely related pollen donors occur, an increase in...

Data from: Perched at the mito-nuclear crossroads: divergent mitochondrial lineages correlate with environment in the face of ongoing nuclear gene flow in an Australian bird

Alexandra Pavlova, J. Nevil Amos, Leo Joseph, Kate Loynes, Jeremy J. Austin, J. Scott Keogh, Graham N. Stone, James Allan Nicholls & Paul Sunnucks
Relationships among multi-locus genetic variation, geography and environment can reveal how evolutionary processes affect genomes. We examined the evolution of an Australian bird, the eastern yellow robin Eopsaltria australis, using mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear (nDNA) genetic markers, and bioclimatic variables. In southeastern Australia, two divergent mtDNA lineages occur east and west of the Great Dividing Range, perpendicular to latitudinal nDNA structure. We evaluated alternative scenarios to explain this striking discordance in landscape genetic patterning. Stochastic...

Data from: Modular tagging of amplicons using a single PCR for high-throughput sequencing

Laurence J. Clarke, Paul Czechowski, Julien Soubrier, Mark I. Stevens & Alan Cooper
High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of PCR amplicons is becoming the method of choice to sequence one or several targeted loci for phylogenetic and DNA barcoding studies. Although the development of HTS has allowed rapid generation of massive amounts of DNA sequence data, preparing amplicons for HTS remains a rate-limiting step. For example, HTS platforms require platform-specific adapter sequences to be present at the 5′ and 3′ end of the DNA fragment to be sequenced. In addition,...

Data from: Did post-glacial sea-level changes initiate the evolutionary divergence of a Tasmanian endemic raptor from its mainland relative?

Christopher P. Burridge, William E. Brown, Jessica Wadley, Danielle L. Nankervis, Lindi Olivier, Michael G. Gardner, Cindy Hull, Robert Barbour & Jeremy J. Austin
Populations on continental islands are often distinguishable from mainland conspecifics with respect to body size, appearance, behaviour, or life history, and this is often congruent with genetic patterns. It is commonly assumed that such differences developed following the complete isolation of populations by sea level rise following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, population divergence may pre-date the LGM, or marine dispersal and colonisation of islands may have occurred more recently; in both cases, populations...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Adelaide
    13
  • University of Wollongong
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • South Australian Museum
    2
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission
    1
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    1
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    1
  • Kristianstad University
    1