10 Works

Data from: Gene amplification of 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase in glyphosate-resistant Kochia scoparia

Andrew T. Wiersma, Todd A. Gaines, Christopher Preston, John P. Hamilton, Darci Giacomini, C. Robin Buell, Jan E. Leach & Philip Westra
The widely used herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Globally, the intensive use of glyphosate for weed control has selected for glyphosate resistance in 31 weed species. Populations of suspected glyphosate-resistant Kochia scoparia were collected from fields located in the US central Great Plains. Glyphosate dose response verified glyphosate resistance in nine populations. The mechanism of resistance to glyphosate was investigated using targeted sequencing, quantitative PCR, immunoblotting, and whole transcriptome de...

Data from: Ancient DNA reveals elephant birds and kiwi are sister taxa and clarifies ratite bird evolution

Kieren J. Mitchell, Bastien Llamas, Julien Soubrier, Nicolas J. Rawlence, Trevor H. Worthy, Jamie Wood, Michael S. Y. Lee & Alan Cooper
The evolution of the ratite birds has been widely attributed to vicariant speciation, driven by the Cretaceous breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana. The early isolation of Africa and Madagascar implies that the ostrich and extinct Madagascan elephant birds (Aepyornithidae) should be the oldest ratite lineages. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two elephant birds and performed phylogenetic analyses, which revealed that these birds are the closest relatives of the New Zealand kiwi and are distant...

Data from: Understanding the biological invasion risk posed by the global wildlife trade: propagule pressure drives the introduction and establishment of Nearctic turtles

Pablo García-Díaz, Joshua V. Ross, César Ayres & Phillip Cassey
Biological invasions are a key component of human-induced global change. The continuing increase in global wildlife trade has raised concerns about the parallel increase in the number of new invasive species. However, the factors that link the wildlife trade to the biological invasion process are still poorly understood. Moreover, there are analytical challenges in researching the role of global wildlife trade in biological invasions, particularly issues related to the under-reporting of introduced and established populations...

Data from: A multigene molecular assessment of cryptic biodiversity in the iconic freshwater blackfishes (Teleostei: Percichthyidae: Gadopsis) of south-eastern Australia

Michael P. Hammer, Peter J. Unmack, Mark Adams, Tarmo A. Raadik & Jerald B. Johnson
Freshwater biodiversity is under ever increasing threat from human activities, and its conservation and management require a sound knowledge of species-level taxonomy. Cryptic biodiversity is a common feature for aquatic systems, particularly in Australia, where recent genetic assessments suggest that the actual number of freshwater fish species may be considerably higher than currently listed. The freshwater blackfishes (genus Gadopsis) are an iconic group in south-eastern Australia and, in combination with their broad, naturally divided distribution...

Data from: Detection of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects using ultrasound radiofrequency-tracking technology

Lili Niu, Yanling Zhang, Long Meng, Yang Xiao, Kelvin K. L. Wong, Derek Abbott, Hairong Zheng, Rongqin Zheng & Ming Qian
Objective: Atherosclerosis is a chronic and systemic disease and its developmental process involves the synergism of multiple risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity and smoking. The diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis is essential for strategic guidance towards suitable treatments and efficient prevention against acute cardiovascular events. This study employed ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) tracking technology to characterize human carotid arteries in vivo in terms of intima-media thickness (IMT) and artery stiffness, and evaluated the statistical...

Data from: Empirical tests of harvest-induced body-size evolution along a geographic gradient in Australian macropods

Thomas A. A. Prowse, Rachel A. Correll, Christopher N. Johnson, Gavin J. Prideaux & Barry W. Brook
1. Life-history theory predicts the progressive dwarfing of animal populations that are subjected to chronic mortality stress but the evolutionary impact of harvesting terrestrial herbivores has seldom been tested. In Australia, marsupials of the genus Macropus (kangaroos and wallabies) are subjected to size-selective commercial harvesting. Mathematical modelling suggests that harvest quotas (ca. 10–20 % of population estimates annually) could be driving body-size evolution in these species. 2. We tested this hypothesis for three harvested macropod...

Data from: Opsin transcripts of predatory diving beetles: a comparison of surface and subterranean photic niches

Simon M. Tierney, Steven J. B. Cooper, Kathleen M. Saint, Terry Bertozzi, Josephine Hyde, William F. Humphreys & Andrew D. Austin
The regressive evolution of eyes has long intrigued biologists yet the genetic underpinnings remain opaque. A system of discrete aquifers in arid Australia provides a powerful comparative means to explore trait regression at the genomic level. Multiple surface ancestors from two tribes of diving beetles (Dytiscidae) repeatedly invaded these calcrete aquifers and convergently evolved eye-less phenotypes. We use this system to assess transcription of opsin photoreceptor genes among the transcriptomes of two surface and three...

Data from: Global biodiversity assessment and hyper-cryptic species complexes: more than one species of elephant in the room?

Mark Adams, Tarmo A. Raadik, Christopher P. Burridge & Arthur Georges
Several recent estimates of global biodiversity have concluded that the total number of species on Earth lies near the lower end of the wide range touted in previous decades. However, none of these recent estimates formally explore the real ‘elephant in the room’, namely, what proportion of species are taxonomically invisible to conventional assessments, and thus, as undiagnosed cryptic species, remain uncountable until revealed by multi-gene molecular assessments. Here we explore the significance and extent...

Data from: Ocean-scale prediction of whale shark distribution

Ana Sequeira, Camille Mellin, David Rowat, Mark G. Meekan & Corey J. A. Bradshaw
Aim: Predicting distribution patterns of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus, Smith 1828) in the open ocean remains elusive owing to few pelagic records. We developed multivariate distribution models of seasonally variant whale shark distributions derived from tuna purse-seine fishery data. We tested the hypotheses that whale sharks use a narrow temperature range, are more abundant in productive waters and select sites closer to continents than the open ocean. Location: Indian Ocean. Methods: We compared a 17-year...

Data from: Environmental metabarcodes for insects: in silico PCR reveals potential for taxonomic bias

Laurence J. Clarke, Julien Soubrier, Laura S. Weyrich & Alan Cooper
Studies of insect assemblages are suited to the simultaneous DNA-based identification of multiple taxa known as metabarcoding. To obtain accurate estimates of diversity, metabarcoding markers ideally possess appropriate taxonomic coverage to avoid PCR-amplification bias, as well as sufficient sequence divergence to resolve species. We used in silico PCR to compare the taxonomic coverage and resolution of newly designed insect metabarcodes (targeting 16S) with that of existing markers (16S and COI) and then compared their efficiency...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • University of Adelaide
    10
  • South Australian Museum
    3
  • Flinders University
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Canberra
    2
  • Western Australian Museum
    1
  • Landcare Research
    1
  • Colorado State University
    1
  • University of Western Australia
    1
  • Brigham Young University
    1