29 Works

Data from: Previous exposure to myxomatosis reduces survival of European rabbits during outbreaks of rabbit haemorrhagic disease

Louise K. Barnett, Thomas A. A. Prowse, David E Peacock, Gregory J Mutze, Ron G. Sinclair, John Kovaliski, Brian D. Cooke & Corey J. A. Bradshaw
1. Exploiting disease and parasite synergies could increase the efficacy of biological control of invasive species. In Australia, two viruses were introduced to control European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus — myxoma virus in 1950, and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in 1995. While these biological controls caused initial declines of > 95% in affected populations, today rabbits remain a problem in many areas, despite recurring outbreaks of both diseases. 2. We used eighteen years of capture-mark-recapture, dead...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: Range‐wide population genetic structure of the Caribbean marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum

Kor-Jent Van Dijk, Eric Bricker, Brigitta Ine Van Tussenbroek & Michelle Waycott
Many marine species have widespread geographic ranges derived from their evolutionary and ecological history particularly their modes of dispersal. Seagrass (marine angiosperm) species have ranges that are unusually widespread, which is not unexpected following recent reviews of reproductive strategies demonstrating the potential for long distance dispersal combined with longevity through clonality. An exemplar of these dual biological features is turtlegrass (Thalassia testudinum) which is an ecologically important species throughout the tropical Atlantic region. Turtlegrass has...

Data from: Genetic diversity and drivers of dwarfism in extinct island emu populations

Vicki A. Thomson, Kieren J. Mitchell, Rolan Eberhard, Joe Dortch, Jeremy J. Austin & Alan Cooper
Australia’s iconic emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae novaehollandiae) is the only living representative of its genus, but fossil evidence and reports from early European explorers suggest that three island forms (at least two of which were dwarfs) became extinct during the 19th century. While one of these - the King Island emu - has been found to be conspecific with Australian mainland emus, little is known about how the other two forms - Kangaroo Island and Tasmanian...

Data from: Effects of sampling effort on biodiversity patterns estimated from environmental DNA metabarcoding surveys

Erin K. Grey, Louis Bernatchez, Phillip Cassey, Kristy Deiner, Marty Deveney, Kimberley L. Howland, Anaïs Lacoursière-Roussel, Sandric Chee Yew Leong, Yiyuan Li, Brett Olds, Michael E. Pfrender, Thomas A. A. Prowse, Mark A. Renshaw & David M. Lodge
Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding can greatly enhance our understanding of global biodiversity and our ability to detect rare or cryptic species. However, sampling effort must be considered when interpreting results from these surveys. We explored how sampling effort influenced biodiversity patterns and nonindigenous species (NIS) detection in an eDNA metabarcoding survey of four commercial ports. Overall, we captured sequences from 18 metazoan phyla with minimal differences in taxonomic coverage between 18 S and COI primer...

Data from: The biomechanics of foraging determines face length among kangaroos and their relatives

D. Rex Mitchell, Emma Sherratt, Justin A. Ledogar & Stephen Wroe
Increasing body size is accompanied by facial elongation across a number of mammalian taxa. This trend forms the basis of a proposed evolutionary rule, cranial evolutionary allometry (CREA). However, facial length has also been widely associated with the varying mechanical resistance of foods. Here, we combine geometric morphometric and computational biomechanical analyses to determine whether evolutionary allometry or feeding ecology have been dominant influences on facial elongation across sixteen species of kangaroos and relatives (Macropodiformes)....

Data from: Molecular evidence for the first records of facultative parthenogenesis in elapid snakes.

Luke Allen, Kate L. Sanders & Vicki A. Thomson
Parthenogenesis is a form of asexual reproduction by which embryos develop from unfertilized eggs. Parthenogenesis occurs in reptiles, however is not yet known to occur in the widespread elapid snakes (Elapidae), which include well-known taxa such as cobras, mambas, taipans and sea snakes. Here, we describe the production of viable parthenogens in two species of Australo-Papuan elapids with divergent reproductive modes: the oviparous Coastal/Papuan Taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) and the viviparous Southern Death Adder (Acanthophis antarcticus)....

Data from: Disentangling synergistic disease dynamics: Implications for the viral biocontrol of rabbits

Konstans Wells, Damien A. Fordham, Barry W. Brook, Phillip Cassey, Tarnya Cox, Robert B. O’Hara, Nina I. Schwensow & Robert B. O'Hara
European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) have been exposed to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and myxoma virus (MYXV) in their native and invasive ranges for decades. Yet, the long‐term effects of these viruses on rabbit population dynamics remain poorly understood. In this context, we analysed 17 years of detailed capture–mark–recapture data (2000–2016) from Turretfield, South Australia, using a probabilistic state‐space hierarchical modelling framework to estimate rabbit survival and epidemiological dynamics. While RHDV infection and disease‐induced death...

Data from: Eradicating abundant invasive prey could cause unexpected and varied biodiversity outcomes: the importance of multi-species interactions

Miguel Lurgi, Euan G. Ritchie & Damien A. Fordham
1. Abundant and widely-distributed invasive prey can negatively affect co-occurring native species by competing for food and/or shelter, removing vegetation cover and reducing habitat complexity (changing predation risk), and by sustaining elevated abundances of invasive mesopredators. However, information regarding the community and trophic consequences of controlling invasive prey, and their temporal dynamics, remain poorly understood. 2. We used multi-species ecological network models to simulate the consequences of changing European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus abundance in an...

Data from: Impacts of inference method and dataset filtering on phylogenomic resolution in a rapid radiation of ground squirrels (Xerinae: Marmotini)

Bryan S. McLean, Kayce C. Bell, Julia M. Allen, Kristofer M. Helgen, Joseph A. Cook & Julie M Allen
Phylogenomic datasets are illuminating many areas of the Tree of Life. However, the large size of these datasets alone may be insufficient to resolve problematic nodes in the most rapid evolutionary radiations, because inferences in zones of extraordinarily low phylogenetic signal can be sensitive to the model and method of inference, as well as the information content of loci employed. We used a dataset of >3,950 ultraconserved element (UCE) loci from a classic mammalian radiation,...

Data from: Rates of population differentiation and speciation are decoupled in sea snakes

Charlotte R. Nitschke, Mathew Hourston, Vinay Udyawer & Kate L. Sanders
Comparative phylogeography can inform many macroevolutionary questions, such as whether species diversification is limited by rates of geographic population differentiation. We examined the link between population genetic structure and species diversification in the fully aquatic sea snakes (Hydrophiinae) by comparing mitochondrial phylogeography in 16 species from two closely related clades that show contrasting diversification dynamics across northern Australia. Contrary to expectations from theory and several empirical studies, our results show that, at the geographic scale...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A. F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Greger Larson
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the Oral Health Literacy Assessment in Spanish and development of a shortened form of the instrument

Fernanda Maria Rovai Bado, Flávio Rebustini, Lisa Jamieson, Karine Laura Cortellazzi & Fábio Luiz Mialhe
Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Oral Health Literacy Assessment in Spanish (OHLA-S) for the Brazilian-Portuguese language using robust analysis and with the results disclose possibilities to develop a shorter and more valid instrument. Methods: OHLA-S is an oral health literacy instrument comprising a word recognition section and a comprehension section. It consists of 24 dental words. It was translated into the Brazilian-Portuguese language (OHLA-B) and its...

Data from: Population structure and gene flow of the tropical seagrass, Syringodium filiforme, in the Florida Keys and subtropical Atlantic region

Alexandra Bijak, Kor-Jent Van Dijk, Michelle Waycott & Alexandra L. Bijak
Evaluating genetic diversity of seagrasses provides insight into reproductive mode and adaptation potential, and is therefore integral to broader conservation strategies for coastal ecosystems. In this study, we assessed genetic diversity, population structure and gene flow in an opportunistic seagrass, Syringodium filiforme, in the Florida Keys and subtropical Atlantic region. We used microsatellite markers to analyze 20 populations throughout the Florida Keys, South Florida, Bermuda and the Bahamas primarily to understand how genetic diversity of...

Data from: Comparative phylogeography biogeography of forest-dependent mammals reveals paleo-forest corridors throughout Sundaland

Victor C. Mason, Kristofer M. Helgen & William J. Murphy
The evolutionary history of the colugo, a gliding arboreal mammal distributed throughout Sundaland, was influenced by the location of and connections between forest habitats. By comparing colugo phylogenetic patterns, species ecology, sample distributions, and times of divergence to those of other Sundaic taxa with different life history traits and dispersal capabilities, we inferred the probable distribution of paleo-forest corridors. We identified a consistent pattern of early diversification between east and west Bornean lineages in colugos,...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Genetic structure and diversity among historic and modern populations of the Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis)

Jessica R. Brandt, Peter J. Van Coeverden De Groot, Kelsey E. Witt, Paige K. Engelbrektsson, Kristofer M. Hegen, Ripan S. Malhi, Oliver A. Ryder, Alfred L. Roca & Kristofer M Helgen
The Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), once widespread across Southeast Asia, now consists of as few as 30 individuals within Sumatra and Borneo. To aid in conservation planning, we sequenced 218 bp of control region mitochondrial (mt) DNA, identifying 17 distinct mitochondrial haplotypes across modern (N = 13) and museum (N = 26) samples. Museum specimens from Laos and Myanmar had divergent mtDNA, consistent with the placement of western mainland rhinos into the distinct subspecies D....

Data from: Trait-specific processes of convergence and conservatism shape ecomorphological evolution in ground-dwelling squirrels

Bryan S. McLean, Kristofer M. Helgen, H. Thomas Goodwin & Joseph A. Cook
Our understanding of mechanisms operating over deep timescales to shape phenotypic diversity often hinges on linking variation in one or few trait(s) to specific evolutionary processes. When distinct processes are capable of similar phenotypic signatures, however, identifying these drivers is difficult. We explored ecomorphological evolution across a radiation of ground-dwelling squirrels whose history includes convergence and constraint, two processes that can yield similar signatures of standing phenotypic diversity. Using 4 ecologically-relevant trait datasets (body size,...

Data from: New insights on water buffalo genomic diversity and post-domestication migration routes from medium density SNP chip data

Licia Colli, Marco Milanesi, Elia Vajana, Daniela Iamartino, Lorenzo Bomba, Francesco Puglisi, Marcello Del Corvo, Ezequiel Luis Nicolazzi, Sahar Saad El-Din Ahmed, Jesus Rommel V. Herrera, Libertado Cruz, Shuju Zhang, Aixin Liang, Gouhua Hua, Ligou Yang, Xingjie Hao, Fuyuan Zuo, Song-Jia Lai, Shuilian Wang, Ruyu Liu, Yundeng Gong, Mahdi Mokhber, Yongjiang Mao, Feng Guan, Augustin Vlaic … & Liguo Yang
The domestic water buffalo is native to the Asian continent but through historical migrations and recent importations, nowadays has a worldwide distribution. The two types of water buffalo, i.e., river and swamp, display distinct morphological and behavioral traits, different karyotypes and also have different purposes and geographical distributions. River buffaloes from Pakistan, Iran, Turkey, Egypt, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, Mozambique, Brazil and Colombia, and swamp buffaloes from China, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and Brazil were genotyped with...

Data from: Reconstructing the evolution of giant extinct kangaroos: comparing the utility of DNA, morphology, and total evidence

Manuela Cascini, Kieren J. Mitchell, Alan Cooper & Matthew J. Phillips
Combined “total evidence” analysis of molecular and morphological data offers the opportunity to objectively merge fossils into the tree of life, and challenges the primacy of solely DNA based phylogenetic and dating inference, even among modern taxa. To investigate the relative utility of DNA, morphology, and total evidence for evolutionary inference, we sequenced the first near-complete mitochondrial genomes from extinct Australian megafauna: a 40-50 thousand year old giant short-faced kangaroo (Simosthenurus occidentalis) and giant wallaby...

Data from: Nutrition in extreme food specialists: an illustration using termites

Laure-Anne Poissonnier, Sara Arganda, Stephen J. Simpson, Audrey Dussutour & Jerome Buhl
1. Recent nutritional ecology theories predict that an organism feeding on a single, highly predictable food should lack the typical active regulation of nutrient balance observed in all other organisms studied so far. It could instead limit itself to controlling the amount of food eaten alone. Such an animal would however be strongly affected by nutrient imbalances. 2. Termites are an ideal model animal to test those predictions. 3. We investigated how the nutritional content...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP markers breathe new life into phylogeography and species delimitation for the problematic short-necked turtles (Chelidae: Emydura) of eastern Australia

Arthur Georges, Bernd Gruber, Greg B. Pauly, Duanne White, Mark Adams, Matthew J. Young, Andzrej Kilian, Xiuwen Zhang, H. Bradley Shaffer, Peter J. Unmack & Andrzej Kilian
Understanding the evolutionary history of diversifying lineages and the delineation of evolutionarily significant units and species remain major challenges for evolutionary biology. Low cost representational sampling of the genome for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shows great potential at the temporal scales that are typically the focus of species delimitation and phylogeography. We apply these markers to a case study of a freshwater turtle, Emydura macquarii, whose systematics has so far defied resolution, to bring to...

Data from: Exploring mechanisms and origins of reduced dispersal in island Komodo dragons

Tim S. Jessop, Achmad Arieifandy, Deni Purwandana, Claudio Ciofi, Jeri Imansyah, Yunias Jackson Benu, Damien A. Fordham, David M. Forsyth, Raoul A. Mulder, Benjamin L. Phillips & Achmad Ariefiandy
Loss of dispersal typifies island biotas, but the selective processes driving this phenomenon remain contentious. This is because selection via, both indirect (e.g. relaxed selection or island syndromes) and direct (e.g. natural selection or spatial sorting) processes may be involved, and no study has yet convincingly distinguished between these alternatives. Here we combined observational and experimental analyses of an island lizard, the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis, the world’s largest lizard), to provide evidence for the...

Data from: Intragenomic ITS2 variation in a genus of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): implications for accurate species delimitation and phylogenetic analysis

Erinn P. Fagan-Jeffries, Steven J.B. Cooper, Tessa M. Bradford & Andrew D. Austin
A recent DNA barcoding study of Australian microgastrines (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) sought to use next generation sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) barcoding gene region, the wingless (WG) gene and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) to delimit molecular species in a highly diverse group of parasitic wasps. Large intragenomic distances between ITS2 variants, often larger than the average interspecific variation, caused difficulties in using ITS2 for species delimitation in both threshold and...

Data from: Symmetry breaking and inter-clonal behavioural variability in slime molds

David Vogel, Audrey Dussutour & Jean-Louis Deneubourg
Cells are dynamic systems capable of switching from an isotropic growth to a polarized growth even in the absence of any pre-existing external asymmetry. Here, we study this process of symmetry breaking in the acellular slime mold Physarum polycephalum. In the experiments slime molds could grow on two identical opposed sources of calcium. We highlighted a positive correlation between growth dynamic, level of symmetry breaking and calcium concentration. We identified three populations of slime molds...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • University of Adelaide
    29
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Texas A&M University
    3
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    2
  • University of Virginia
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • Deakin University
    2
  • University of Bern
    2