3 Works

Data from: The population and landscape genetics of the European badger (Meles meles) in Ireland.

Jimena Guerrero, Andrew W. Byrne, John Lavery, Eleanor Breadon, Gavin Kelly, Emily A. Courcier, James O'Keefe, Ursula Fogarty, Denise B. O'Meara, Dennis Ensing, Carl McCormick, Roman Biek, Robin A. Skuce, Adrian R. Allen & James O'Keeffe
The population genetic structure of free-ranging species is expected to reflect landscape-level effects. Quantifying the role of these factors and their relative contribution often has important implications for wildlife management. The population genetics of the European badger (Meles meles) have received considerable attention, not least because the species acts as a potential wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Britain and Ireland. Herein, we detail the most comprehensive population and landscape genetic study of the...

Data from: Dispersal patterns in a medium-density Irish badger population: implications for understanding the dynamics of tuberculosis transmission.

Aoibheann Gaughran, Teresa MacWhite, Enda Mullen, Peter Maher, David Kelly, Nicola Marples & Margaret Good
European badgers (Meles meles) are group-living mustelids implicated in the spread of bovine tuberculosis (TB) to cattle and act as a wildlife reservoir for the disease. In badgers, only a minority of individuals disperse from their natal social group. However, dispersal may be extremely important for the spread of TB, as dispersers could act as hubs for disease transmission. We monitored a population of 139 wild badgers over seven years in a medium-density population (1.8...

Genetic evidence further elucidates the history and extent of badger introductions from Great Britain into Ireland

Adrian Allen, Jimena Guerrero, Andrew Byrne, John Lavery, Eleanor Presho, Emily Courcier, James O'Keeffe, Ursula Fogarty, Richard Delahay, Gavin Wilson, Chris Newman, Christina Buesching, Matthew Silk, Denise O'Meara, Robin Skuce, Roman Biek & Robbie A. McDonald
The colonization of Ireland by mammals, has been the subject of extensive study using genetic methods, and forms a central problem in understanding the phylo-geography of European mammals after the Last Glacial Maximum. Ireland exhibits a de-pauperate mammal fauna relative to Great Britain and continental Europe, and a range of natural and anthropogenic processes have given rise to its modern fauna. Previous Europe-wide surveys of the European badger (Meles meles) have found conflicting microsatellite and...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    1
  • 2019
    1
  • 2018
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine
    3
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • Waterford Institute of Technology
    2
  • Agri Food and Biosciences Institute
    2
  • Irish Equine Centre
    2
  • Department of Agriculture
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs
    1
  • National Parks and Wildlife Service
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1