3 Works

Data from: Quantifying hummingbird preference for floral trait combinations: the role of selection on trait interactions in the evolution of pollination syndromes

Charles B. Fenster, Richard J. Reynolds, Christopher W. Williams, Robert Makowsky & Michele R. Dudash
Darwin recognized the flower's importance for the study of adaptation and emphasized that the flower's functionality reflects the coordinated action of multiple traits. Here we use a multi-trait manipulative approach to quantify the potential role of selection acting on floral trait combinations underlying the divergence and maintenance of three related North American species of Silene (Caryophyllaceae). We artificially generated 48 plant phenotypes corresponding to all combinations of key attractive traits differing among the three Silene...

Data from: Specificity and strain-typing capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae detection

Kelley C. Henderson, Alvaro J. Benitez, Amy E. Ratliff, Donna M. Crabb, Edward S. Sheppard, Jonas M. Winchell, Richard A. Dluhy, Ken B. Waites, T. Prescott Atkinson & Duncan C. Krause
Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously...

Data from: Sustained fitness gains and variability in fitness trajectories in the long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli

Richard E. Lenski, Michael J. Wiser, Noah Ribeck, Zachary D. Blount, Joshua R. Nahum, James Jeffrey Morris, Luis Zaman, Caroline B. Turner, Brian D. Wade, Rohan Maddamsetti, Alita R. Burmeister, Elizabeth J. Baird, Jay Bundy, Nkrumah A. Grant, Kyle J. Card, Maia Rowles, Kiyana Weatherspoon, Spiridon E. Papoulis, Rachel Sullivan, Colleen Clark, Joseph S. Mulka & Neerja Hajela
Many populations live in environments subject to frequent biotic and abiotic changes. Nonetheless, it is interesting to ask whether an evolving population's mean fitness can increase indefinitely, and potentially without any limit, even in a constant environment. A recent study showed that fitness trajectories of Escherichia coli populations over 50 000 generations were better described by a power-law model than by a hyperbolic model. According to the power-law model, the rate of fitness gain declines...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
    3
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Pittsburgh
    1
  • National Institutes of Health
    1
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    1
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    1
  • Frostburg State University
    1
  • Michigan State University
    1