14 Works

Data from: Standing geographic variation in eclosion time and the genomics of host race formation in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies

Meredith M. Doellman, Scott P. Egan, Gregory J. Ragland, Peter J. Meyers, Glen R. Hood, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Peter Lazorchak, Daniel A. Hahn, Stewart H. Berlocher, Patrik Nosil, Jeff L. Feder, Jeffrey L. Feder & Thomas H. Q. Powell
Taxa harboring high levels of standing variation may be more likely to adapt to rapid environmental shifts and experience ecological speciation. Here, we characterize geographic and host-related differentiation for 10,241 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies to infer if standing genetic variation in adult eclosion time in the ancestral hawthorn (Crataegus spp.)-infesting host race, as opposed to new mutations, contributed substantially to its recent shift to earlier fruiting apple (Malus domestica). Allele frequency...

Data from: Understanding the recruitment response of juvenile Neotropical trees to logging intensity using functional traits

J. Aaron Hogan, Bruno Hérault, Bénédicte Bachelot, Anaїs Gorel, Marianne Jounieaux & Christopher Baraloto
Selective-logging remains a widespread practice in tropical forests, yet the long-term effects of timber-harvest on juvenile tree (i.e., sapling) recruitment across the hundreds of species occurring in most tropical forests, remain difficult to predict. This uncertainty could potentially exacerbate threats to some of the thousands of timber-valuable tree species in the Amazon. Our objective was to determine to what extent long-term responses of tree species regeneration in logged forests can be explained by their functional...

Data from: Fruiting phenology is linked to rainfall variability in a tropical rain forest

Amy E. Dunham, Onja H. Razafindratsima, Paul Rakotonirina, Patricia C. Wright. & Patricia C. Wright
As the influence of climate change on tropical forests becomes apparent, more studies are needed to understand how changes in climatic variables like rainfall are likely to affect tree phenology. Using a twelve-year dataset (2005–2016), we studied the impact of seasonal rainfall patterns on the fruiting phenology of 69 tree species in the rain forest of southeastern Madagascar. We found that average annual rainfall in this region has increased by >800mm (23%) during this period...

Data from: Non-linear effects of phenological shifts link inter-annual variation to species interactions

Volker H.W. Rudolf & Volker H. W. Rudolf
1. The vast majority of species interactions are seasonally structured and depend on species’ relative phenologies. However, differences in the phenologies of species naturally vary across years and are altered by ongoing climate change around the world. 2. By combining experiments that shifted the relative hatching of two competing tadpole species across a productivity gradient with simulations of inter-annual variation in arrival times I tested how phenological variation across years can alter the strength and...

Data from: Faster processing of moving compared to flashed bars in awake macaque V1 provides a neural correlate of the flash lag illusion

Manivannan Subramaniyan, Alexander S. Ecker, Saumil S. Patel, R. James Cotton, Matthias Bethge, Xaq Pitkow, Philipp Berens & Andreas S. Tolias
When the brain has determined the position of a moving object, due to anatomical and processing delays, the object will have already moved to a new location. Given the statistical regularities present in natural motion, the brain may have acquired compensatory mechanisms to minimize the mismatch between the perceived and the real position of moving objects. A well-known visual illusion — the flash lag effect — points towards such a possibility. Although many psychophysical models...

Data from: Within-host priority effects systematically alter pathogen coexistence

Patrick A. Clay, Kailash Dhir, Volker H.W. Rudolf, Meghan A. Duffy & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Coinfection of host populations alters pathogen prevalence, host mortality, and pathogen evolution. Because pathogens compete for limiting resources, whether multiple pathogens can coexist in a host population can depend on their within-host interactions which, in turn, can depend on the order in which pathogens infect hosts (within-host priority effects). However, the consequences of within-host priority effects for pathogen coexistence have not been tested. Using laboratory studies with a coinfected zooplankton system, we found that pathogens...

Data from: Drivers of individual niche variation in coexisting species

Raul Costa-Pereira, Volker H.W. Rudolf, Franco L. Souza, Marcio S. Araujo & Volker H. W. Rudolf
1. Although neglected by classic niche theory, individual variation is now recognized as a prevalent phenomenon in nature with evolutionary and ecological relevance. Recent theory suggests that differences in individual variation across competitors can affect species coexistence and community patterns. However, the degree of individual variation is flexible across wild populations and we still know little about the ecological drivers of this variation across populations of single species and, especially, across coexisting species. 2. Here...

Data from: Genomic differentiation during speciation-with-gene-flow: comparing geographic and host-related variation in divergent life history adaptation in Rhagoletis pomonella

Meredith M. Doellman, Gregory J. Ragland, Glen R. Hood, Peter J. Meyers, Scott P. Egan, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Peter Lazorchak, Mary M. Glover, Cheyenne Tait, Hannes Schuler, Daniel A. Hahn, Stewart H. Berlocher, James J. Smith, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder, Daniel Hahn, Stewart Berlocher, Peter Meyers, Scott Egan, Jeffrey Feder, Glen Hood, Thomas Powell & Gregory Ragland
A major goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how variation within populations gets partitioned into differences between reproductively isolated species. Here, we examine the degree to which diapause life history timing, a critical adaptation promoting population divergence, explains geographic and host-related genetic variation in ancestral hawthorn and recently derived apple-infesting races of Rhagoletis pomonella. Our strategy involved combining experiments on two different aspects of diapause (initial diapause intensity and adult eclosion time) with a...

Data from: Priority effects within coinfected hosts can drive unexpected population-scale patterns of parasite prevalence

Patrick A. Clay, Michael H. Cortez, Meghan A. Duffy & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Organisms are frequently coinfected by multiple parasite strains and species, and interactions between parasites within hosts are known to influence parasite prevalence and diversity, as well as epidemic timing. Importantly, interactions between coinfecting parasites can be affected by the order in which they infect hosts (i.e. within-host priority effects). In this study, we use a single-host, two-pathogen, SI model with environmental transmission to explore how within-host priority effects scale up to alter host population-scale infection...

Data from: Diversity and distribution of Wolbachia in relation to geography, host plant affiliation and life cycle of a heterogonic gall wasp

Hannes Schuler, Scott P. Egan, Glen R. Hood, Robert W. Busbee, Amanda L. Driscoe & James R. Ott
Background: The maternally inherited endosymbiont Wolbachia is widespread in arthropods and nematodes and can play an important role in the ecology and evolution of its host through reproductive manipulation. Here, we survey Wolbachia in Belonocnema treatae, a widely distributed North American cynipid gall forming wasp that exhibits regional host specialization on three species of oaks and alternation of sexually and aseuxlly reproducing generations. We investigated whether patterns of Wolbachia infection and diversity in B. treatae...

Data from: Social context alters host behavior and infection risk

Carl N. Keiser, Volker H.W. Rudolf, Elizabeth Sartain, Emma R. Every, Julia B. Saltz & Volker H W Rudolf
Variation in infection risk and transmission potential are widespread in human and wildlife diseases and play a central role in host-pathogen dynamics. To explain this variation, most studies focus on linking host traits to differences in pathogen exposure, infection, and transmission, but typically do not to account for hosts’ social context. Yet, an individual’s risk of acquiring infection is likely influenced jointly by their own traits and their social environment. Here, we use three natural...

Data from: Life-history and behavioral trait covariation across 3 years in Temnothorax ants

Sarah E. Bengston
Consistent among- individual differences in behavior have been described in numerous taxa. More recently, the hypothesis that such behavioral variation may also correlate to life-history traits, such as investment in current or future reproduction, has been proposed as a potential explanation for why variation is maintained among and within populations. A continual challenge in measuring the integration of these traits, or the Pace – of – Life Syndrome, is to find a reliable and quantifiable...

Data from: Trophic structure alters consequences of environmental warming

Volker H.W. Rudolf, Amber Roman & Volker H. W. Rudolf
Climate warming can directly affect traits and demographic rates of organisms. However, individuals are embedded in complex networks of ecological interactions with other members of the community, allowing for a range of direct and indirect effects that depend on the trophic structure of the community. Here we show that effects of warming (i.e. increase in mean temperature) on a given species can strongly depend on the community context and trophic complexity of the system. Specifically,...

Data from: Genomic region detection via Spatial Convex Clustering

John Nagorski & Genevera I. Allen
Several modern genomic technologies, such as DNA-Methylation arrays, measure spatially registered probes that number in the hundreds of thousands across multiple chromosomes. The measured probes are by themselves less interesting scientifically; instead scientists seek to discover biologically interpretable genomic regions comprised of contiguous groups of probes which may act as biomarkers of disease or serve as a dimension-reducing pre-processing step for downstream analyses. In this paper, we introduce an unsupervised feature learning technique which maps...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Rice University
    14
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • University of Notre Dame
    2
  • Johns Hopkins University
    2
  • State University of New York
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
    2
  • Notre Dame University
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1