3 Works

Vellozioid roots allow for habitat specialisation among rock- and soil-dwelling Velloziaceae in campos rupestres

Anna Abrahão, Patrícia De Britto Costa, Grazielle Sales Teodoro, Hans Lambers, Diego L. Nascimento, Sara A. L. De Andrade, Megan H. Ryan & Rafael S. Oliveira
1. Plant growth on harsh substrates (habitat specialisation) requires specific traits to cope with stressful conditions. 2. We tested whether traits related to nutrient acquisition (root colonisation by fungal symbionts, and plant morphological and physiological specialisations), and nutrient use (leaf nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and N- and P-remobilisation efficiency), were related to habitat specialisation for 27 species of Velloziaceae growing either in soil or on rocks in extremely P-impoverished campos rupestres habitats. If...

Conflicting signal in transcriptomic markers leads to a poorly resolved backbone phylogeny of Chalcidoid wasps

Junxia Zhang, Amelia R.I. Lindsey, Ralph S. Peters, John M. Heraty, Keith R. Hopper, John H. Werren, Ellen O. Martinson, James B. Woolley, Matt J. Yoder & Lars Krogmann
Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are a megadiverse superfamily of wasps with astounding variation in both morphology and biology. Most species are parasitoids and important natural enemies of insects in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we explored a transcriptome-based phylogeny of Chalcidoidea and found that poorly resolved relationships could only be marginally improved by adding more genes (a total of 5,591) and taxa (a total of 65), proof-checking for errors of homology and contamination, and decreasing missing data....

Data from: Cross-boundary human impacts compromise the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem

Michiel P. Veldhuis, Mark E. Ritchie, Joseph O. Ogutu, Thomas A. Morrison, Colin M. Beale, Anna B. Estes, William Mwakilema, Gordon O. Ojwang, Catherine L. Parr, James Probert, Patrick W. Wargute, J. Grant C. Hopcraft & Han Olff
Protected areas provide major benefits for humans in the form of ecosystem services, but landscape degradation by human activity at their edges may compromise their ecological functioning. Using multiple lines of evidence from 40 years of research in the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, we find that such edge degradation has effectively “squeezed” wildlife into the core protected area and has altered the ecosystem’s dynamics even within this 40,000-square-kilometer ecosystem. This spatial cascade reduced resilience in the core...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Hohenheim
    3
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • Texas A&M University
    1
  • Indiana University
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1
  • Hebei University
    1
  • University of Rochester
    1