252 Works

The impact of data quality filtering of opportunistic citizen science data on species distribution model performance: dataset used for Maxent modelling.

Camille Van Eupen, Dirk Maes, Marc Herremans, Kristijn Swinnen, Ben Somers & Stijn Luca
This dataset contains all the necessary data to repeat the analyses conducted in the article 'The impact of data quality filtering of opportunistic citizen science data on species distribution model performance'. Per square kilometer in Flanders, the csv-file contains (i) the model predictor values, (ii) the filtered and unfiltered presence-only occurrences of the 255 considered species used for model training and (iii) the presences and absences per species used for model testing. Details on how...

Flexible habitat choice by aphids exposed to multiple cues reflecting present and future benefits

Yin Wandong, Xue Qi, Tian Baoliang, Yang Shujian, Li Zhengying, Chen Zhaozhao, Ryan Michael & Hoffmann Ary
Mothers choose suitable habitats for laying offspring to maximize fitness. Since habitat quality varies in space and time, mothers gather information to choose among available habitats through multiple cues reflecting different aspects of habitat quality at present and in the future. However, it is unclear how females assess and integrate different cues associated with current rewards and future safety to optimize oviposition/larviposition decisions, especially across small spatial scales. Here we tested the individual and interactive...

Spatial connectedness imposes local- and metapopulation-level selection on life history through feedbacks on demography

Stefano Masier & Dries Bonte
Dispersal evolution impacts the fluxes of individuals and hence, connectivity in metapopulations. Connectivity is therefore decoupled from the structural connectedness of the patches within the spatial network. Because of demographic feedbacks, local selection also drives the evolution of other life history traits. We investigated how different levels of connectedness affect trait evolution in experimental metapopulations of the two-spotted spider mite. We separated local- and metapopulation-level selection and linked trait divergence to population dynamics.

Variation in behavioural traits of two frugivorous mammals may lead to differential responses to human disturbance

Luc Roscelin Dongmo Tédonzong, Jacob Willie, Sandra Tewamba Makengveu, Luc Lens & Nikki Tagg
Human activities can lead to a shift in wildlife species’ spatial distribution. Understanding the specific effects of human activities on ranging behaviour can improve conservation management of wildlife populations in human-dominated landscapes. This study evaluated the effects of forest use by humans on the spatial distribution of mammal species with different behavioural adaptations, using sympatric western lowland gorilla and central chimpanzee as focal species. We collected data on great ape nest locations, ecological and physical...

Data from: Plant and soil microbe responses to light, warming and nitrogen addition in a temperate forest

Shiyu Ma, Kris Verheyen, Ruben Props, Safaa Wasof, Margot Vanhellemont, Pascal Boeckx, Nico Boon & Pieter De Frenne
1. Temperate forests across Europe and eastern North America have become denser since the 1950s due to less intensive forest management and global environmental changes such as nitrogen deposition and climate warming. Denser tree canopies result in lower light availability at the forest floor. This shade may buffer the effects of nitrogen deposition and climate warming on understorey plant communities. 2. We conducted an innovative in-situ field experiment to study the responses of co-occurring soil...

Data from: The third dimension: a novel set-up for filming coelacanths in their natural environment

Thierry Décamps, Anthony Herrel, Laurent Ballesta, Florian Holon, Thibault Rauby, Yannick Gentil, Cédric Gentil, Hugo Dutel, Regis Debruyne, Jean-Benoit Charrassin, Guillaume Eveillard, Gaël Clément & Marc Herbin
Here, we describe a novel design to obtain three-dimensional data on the movements of aquatic organisms at depths of up to 140 m. The set-up consists of two synchronized high-speed cameras fixed to two articulated arms. The set-up was successfully used to film and quantify the locomotion of coelacanths Latimeria chalumnae living at a depth of about 120 m in Sodwana Bay, South Africa. As an example, the detailed motion of the dorsal fin is...

Data from: Evolutionary shifts in the melanin-based color system of birds

Chad M. Eliason, Matthew D. Shawkey, Julia A. Clark & Julia A. Clarke
Melanin pigments contained in organelles (melanosomes) impart earthy colors to feathers. Such melanin-based colors are distributed across birds and thought to be the ancestral color-producing mechanism in birds. However, we have had limited data on melanin-based color and melanosome diversity in Palaeognathae, which includes the flighted tinamous and large-bodied, flightless ratites and is the sister taxon to all other extant birds. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry to assess melanosome morphology and quantify...

Data from: Formin is associated with left-right asymmetry in the pond snail and the frog

Angus Davison, Gary S. McDowell, Jennifer M. Holden, Harriet F. Johnson, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, M. Maureen Liu, Paco Hulpiau, Frans Van Roy, Christopher M. Wade, Ruby Banerjee, Fengtang Yang, Satoshi Chiba, John W. Davey, Daniel J. Jackson, Michael Levin & Mark L. Blaxter
While components of the pathway that establishes left-right asymmetry have been identified in diverse animals, from vertebrates to flies, it is striking that the genes involved in the first symmetry-breaking step remain wholly unknown in the most obviously chiral animals, the gastropod snails. Previously, research on snails was used to show that left-right signaling of Nodal, downstream of symmetry breaking, may be an ancestral feature of the Bilateria. Here, we report that a disabling mutation...

Data from: Fragile coexistence of a global chytrid pathogen with amphibian populations is mediated by environment and demography

Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Stefano Canessa, A. Martel & Frank Pasmans
Unravelling the multiple interacting drivers of host pathogen co-existence is crucial in understanding how an apparently stable state of endemism may shift towards an epidemic and lead to biodiversity loss. Here, we investigate the apparent co-existence of the global amphibian pathogen *Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis* (Bd) with *Bombina variegata* populations in the Netherlands over a seven-year period. We used a multi-season mark-recapture data set and assessed potential drivers of co-existence (individual condition, environmental mediation and demographic compensation)...

Data from: Rapid evolution of larval life history, adult immune function and flight muscles in a poleward moving damselfly

Lieven Therry, Viktor Nilsson-Örtman, Dries Bonte & Robby Stoks
Although a growing number of studies have documented the evolution of adult dispersal-related traits at the range edge of poleward-expanding species, we know little about evolutionary changes in immune function or traits expressed by nondispersing larvae. We investigated differentiation in larval (growth and development) and adult traits (immune function and flight-related traits) between replicated core and edge populations of the poleward-moving damselfly Coenagrion scitulum. These traits were measured on individuals reared in a common garden...

Data from: Influence of device accuracy and choice of algorithm for species distribution modelling of seabirds: a case study using black-browed albatrosses

Petra Quillfeldt, Jan O. Engler, Janet R. D. Silk, Richard A. Phillips & Janet R.D. Silk
Species distribution models (SDM) based on tracking data from different devices are used increasingly to explain and predict seabird distributions. However, different tracking methods provide different data resolutions, ranging from < 10m to >100km. To better understand the implications of this variation, we modeled the potential distribution of black-browed albatrosses Thalassarche melanophris from South Georgia that were simultaneously equipped with a Platform Terminal Transmitter (PTT) (high resolution) and a Global Location Sensor (GLS) logger (coarse...

Data from: Decision making for mitigating wildlife diseases: from theory to practice for an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians

Stefano Canessa, Claudio Bozzuto, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Sam S. Cruickshank, Matthew C. Fisher, Jacob C. Koella, Stefan Lötters, An Martel, Frank Pasmans, Benjamin C. Scheele, Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Sebastian Steinfartz, Benedikt R. Schmidt & Ben C. Scheele
1.Conservation science can be most effective in its decision-support role when seeking answers to clearly formulated questions of direct management relevance. Emerging wildlife diseases, a driver of global biodiversity loss, illustrate the challenges of performing this role: in spite of considerable research, successful disease mitigation is uncommon. Decision analysis is increasingly advocated to guide mitigation planning, but its application remains rare. 2.Using an integral projection model, we explored potential mitigation actions for avoiding population declines...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in genetic relatedness among house sparrows along an urban-rural gradient as revealed by individual-based analysis

Carl Vangestel, Joachim Mergeay, Deborah A. Dawson, Viki Vandomme & Luc Lens
Understanding factors that shape patterns of kinship in sedentary species is important for evolutionary ecologists as well as conservation biologists. Yet, how patterns of relatedness are hierarchically structured in space remains poorly known, even in common species. Here we use information from 16 polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers to study how small-scale kinship structure varies among house sparrows (Passer domesticus) along an urban-rural gradient. Average levels of relatedness were higher among urban individuals than among individuals...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure in contemporary house sparrow populations along an urbanization gradient.

Carl Vangestel, Joachim Mergeay, Deborah A. Dawson, Tom Callens, Viki Vandomme & Luc Lens
House sparrow (Passer domesticus) populations have suffered major declines in urban as well as rural areas, while remaining relatively stable in suburban ones. Yet, to date no exhaustive attempt has been made to examine how, and to what extent, spatial variation in population demography is reflected in genetic population structuring along contemporary urbanization gradients. Here we use putatively neutral microsatellite loci to study if and how genetic variation can be partitioned in a hierarchical way...

Data from: A fish that uses its hydrodynamic tongue to feed on land

Krijn B. Michel, Egon Heiss, Peter Aerts & Sam Van Wassenbergh
To capture and swallow food on land, a sticky tongue supported by the hyoid and gill arch skeleton has evolved in land vertebrates from aquatic ancestors that used mouth-cavity-expanding actions of the hyoid to suck food into the mouth. However, the evolutionary pathway bridging this drastic shift in feeding mechanism and associated hyoid motions remains unknown. Modern fish that feed on land may help to unravel the physical constraints and biomechanical solutions that led to...

Data from: Quantifying population divergence on short timescales

Joost A. M. Raeymaekers, Luc Lens, Frederik Van Den Broeck, Stefan Van Dongen & Filip A. M. Volckaert
Quantifying the contribution of the various processes that influence population genetic structure is important, but difficult. One of the reasons is that no single measure appropriately quantifies all aspects of genetic structure. An increasing number of studies is analyzing population structure using the statistic D, which measures genetic differentiation, next to GST, which is the standardized variance in allele frequencies among populations. Few studies have evaluated which statistic is most appropriate in particular situations. In...

Data from: Feed or fight: testing the impact of food availability and intraspecific aggression on the functional ecology of an island lizard

Colin M. Donihue, Kinsey M. Brock, Johannes Foufopoulos & Anthony Herrel
Body size often varies among insular populations relative to continental conspecifics – the ‘island rule’ – and functional, context-dependent morphological differences tend to track this body size variation on islands. Two hypotheses are often proposed as potential drivers of insular population differences in morphology: one relating to diet and the other involving intraspecific competition and aggression. We directly tested whether differences in morphology and maximum bite capacity were explained by interisland changes in hardness of...

Data from: Selection, constraint and the evolution of coloration in African starlings

Rafael Maia, Dustin R. Rubenstein & Matthew D. Shawkey
Colorful plumage plays a prominent role in evolution of birds, influencing communication (sexual/social selection) and crypsis (natural selection). Comparative studies have focused primarily upon these selective pressures, but the mechanisms underlying color production can also be important by constraining the color gamut upon which selection acts. Iridescence is particularly interesting to study the interaction between selection and color-producing mechanisms because a broad range of colors can be produced with a shared template, and innovations to...

Data from: Socio-demographic, social-cognitive, health-related and physical environmental variables associated with context-specific sitting time in Belgian adolescents: a one-year follow-up study

Cedric Busschaert, Nicola D. Ridgers, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Greet Cardon, Jelle Van Cauwenberg & Katrien De Cocker
Introduction: More knowledge is warranted about multilevel ecological variables associated with context-specific sitting time among adolescents. The present study explored cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of ecological domains of sedentary behaviour, including socio-demographic, social-cognitive, health-related and physical-environmental variables with sitting during TV viewing, computer use, electronic gaming and motorized transport among adolescents. Methods: For this longitudinal study, a sample of Belgian adolescents completed questionnaires at school on context-specific sitting time and associated ecological variables. At baseline,...

Data from: Predator size and prey size-gut capacity ratios determine kill frequency and carcass production in terrestrial carnivorous mammals

Annelies De Cuyper, Marcus Clauss, Chris Carbone, Daryl Codron, An Cools, Myriam Hesta & Geert P. J. Janssens
Carnivore kill frequency is a fundamental part of predator-prey interactions, which are important shapers of ecosystems. Current field kill frequency data are rare and existing models are insufficiently adapted to carnivore functional groups. We developed a kill frequency model accounting for carnivore mass, prey mass, pack size, partial consumption of prey and carnivore gut capacity. Two main carnivore functional groups, small prey-feeders vs large prey-feeders, were established based on the relationship between stomach capacity (C)...

Evaluating the effectiveness of implementation intentions to strengthen approach-avoidance training: Pilot study on alcohol use disorder

Nicolas Kaczmarek, Astrid Mignon, Amelie Rousseau & Charlotte Baey
This pre-registered study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of implementation intention to strengthen approach-avoidance training. It's a pilot study on alcohol use disorder.

Plans - addendum

Sarah Kasran & Jan De Houwer
This is an addendum to the initial pre-registration for this study (which can be found at https://osf.io/s4j5q). Due to an oversight, the original procedure did not assess participants’ memory for the manipulation. This omission was noticed after collecting data for the first 19 participants. Because it would be informative to have an index of how well participants remember the evaluative descriptions, we updated the procedure to include two questions assessing this aspect. This change should...

Data from: Climatic niche lability but growth form conservatism in the African woody flora

Anaïs-Pasiphaé Gorel, Olivier J. Hardy, Gilles Dauby, Kyle G. Dexter, Ricardo A. Segovia, Kathy Steppe & Adeline Fayolle
Climatic niche evolution during the diversification of tropical plants has received little attention in Africa. To address this, we characterized the climatic niche of >4000 tropical African woody species, distinguishing two broad bioclimatic groups (forest vs. savanna) and six subgroups. We quantified niche conservatism versus lability at the genus level and for higher clades, using a molecular phylogeny of >800 genera. Although niche stasis at speciation is prevalent, numerous clades individually cover vast climatic spaces...

Data management guidelines CoBE lab

Frederick Verbruggen & Myriam Mertens

Data from: Genetic signature of population fragmentation varies with mobility in seven bird species of a fragmented Kenyan cloud forest

Tom Callens, Peter Galbusera, Erik Matthysen, Eric Y Durand, Mwangi Githiru, Jeroen R Huyghe & Luc Lens
Habitat fragmentation can restrict geneflow, reduce neighbourhood effective population size, and increase genetic drift and inbreeding in small, isolated habitat remnants. The extent to which habitat fragmentation leads to population fragmentation, however, differs among landscapes and taxa. Commonly, researchers use information on the current status of a species to predict population effects of habitat fragmentation. Such methods, however, do not convey information on species-specific responses to fragmentation. Here we compare levels of past population differentiation,...

Registration Year

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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Ghent University
    231
  • KU Leuven
    25
  • Universiteit Gent
    21
  • University of Antwerp
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  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    16
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    10
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    8
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    7
  • University of Zurich
    6
  • Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
    6