238 Works

Lianas and trees exhibit divergent intrinsic water-use efficiency along elevational gradients in South American and African tropical forests

Francis Mumbanza M., Marijn Bauters, Félicien Meunier, Pascal Boeckx, Lucas Cernusak, Hannes De Deurwaerder, Miro Demol, Camille Meeussen, Bram Sercu, Lore Verryckt, Jana Pauwels, Landry Cizungu N., Selene Báez, Constantin Lubini A. & Hans Verbeeck
Elevational gradients provide excellent opportunities to explore long-term morphological and physiological responses of plants to environmental change. We determined the difference in the elevational pattern of foliar carbon isotope composition (δ13C) between lianas and trees, and assessed whether this difference arises from changes in photosynthesis or stomatal conductance. We also explored the pattern of nutrient limitations with the elevation of these two growth forms. We conducted inventories of lianas and trees using standardized techniques along...

Data from: Sensitivity to habitat fragmentation across European landscapes in three temperate forest herbs

Tobias Naaf, Jannis Till Feigs, Siyu Huang, Jörg Brunet, Sara A. O. Cousins, Guillaume Decocq, Pieter De Frenne, Martin Diekmann, Sanne Govaert, Per-Ola Hedwall, Kenny Helsen, Jonathan Lenoir, Jaan Liira, Camille Meeussen, Jan Plue, Pedro Poli, Fabien Spicher, Pieter Vangansbeke, Thomas Vanneste, Kris Verheyen, Stephanie I. J. Holzhauer & Katja Kramp
Context. Evidence for effects of habitat loss and fragmentation on the viability of temperate forest herb populations in agricultural landscapes is so far based on population genetic studies of single species in single landscapes. However, forest herbs differ in their life histories, and landscapes have different environments, structures and histories, making generalizations difficult. Objectives. We compare the response of three slow-colonizing forest herbs to habitat loss and fragmentation and set this in relation to differences...

Metabarcoding prey Araneus diadematus: TREE platform

Dries Bonte
Trophic interactions may strongly depend on body size and environmental variation, but this prediction has been seldom tested in nature. Many spiders are generalist predators that use webs to intercept flying prey. The size and mesh of orb webs increases with spider size, allowing a more efficient predation on larger prey. We studied to this extent the orb-weaving spider Araneus diadematus inhabiting forest fragments differing in edge distance, tree diversity and tree species. These environmental...

Fruit orchards and woody semi-natural habitat provide complementary resources for pollinators in agricultural landscapes

Maxime Eeraerts
To safeguard insect pollinators and their pollination services, we need to understand how landscape structure regulates the distribution of resources that sustain pollinator populations. However, evidence of how pollinator communities benefit from the variety of resources distributed across different habitat types is scarce. To explore complementary resource provision, we conducted a field study to examine the resources available to pollinators in fruit orchards and woody semi-natural habitat. We studied 13 landscapes containing both habitat types...

The origins of asexual brine shrimps

Nicolas O. Rode, Loreleï Boyer, Élodie Flaven, Francisco Hontoria, Gilbert Van Stappen, France Dufresne, Christoph Haag, Thomas Lenormand & Roula Jabbour-Zahab
Determining how and how often asexual lineages emerge within sexual species is central to our understanding of sex-asex transitions and the long-term maintenance of sex. Asexuality can arise “by transmission” from an existing asexual lineage to a new one, through different types of crosses. The occurrence of these crosses, cryptic sex, variation in ploidy and recombination within asexuals greatly complicates the study of sex-asex transitions, as they preclude the use of standard phylogenetic methods and...

Reduced stress defense responses contribute to the higher toxicity of a pesticide under warming

Vienna Delnat, Janne Swaegers, Jana Asselman & Robby Stoks
There is a pressing need to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the, often magnifying, interactive effects between contaminants and natural stressors. We here test our hypothesis that lower general stress defense responses contribute to synergistic interactions between stressors. We focus on the widespread pattern that many contaminants are more toxic at higher temperatures. Specifically, we tested the effects of an environmentally realistic low-effect and high-effect concentration of the pesticide chlorpyrifos under warming at the gene...

Data from: Context matters: the landscape matrix determines the population genetic structure of temperate forest herbs across Europe

Tobias Naaf, Jannis Till Feigs, Siyu Huang, Jörg Brunet, Sara A. O. Cousins, Guillaume Decocq, Pieter De Frenne, Martin Diekmann, Sanne Govaert, Per-Ola Hedwall, Jonathan Lenoir, Jaan Liira, Camille Meeussen, Jan Plue, Pieter Vangansbeke, Thomas Vanneste, Kris Verheyen, Stephanie I. J. Holzhauer & Katja Kramp
Context. Plant populations in agricultural landscapes are mostly fragmented and their functional connectivity often depends on seed and pollen dispersal by animals. However, little is known about how the interactions of seed and pollen dispersers with the agricultural matrix translate into gene flow among plant populations. Objectives. We aimed to identify effects of the landscape structure on the genetic diversity within, and the genetic differentiation among, spatially isolated populations of three temperate forest herbs. We...

Data from: Delegation to artificial agents fosters prosocial behaviors in the collective risk dilemma

Elias Fernandez Domingos, Inês Terrucha, Rémi Suchon, Jelena Grujić, Juan C. Burguillo, Francisco C. Santos & Tom Lenaerts
Home assistant chat-bots, self-driving cars, drones or automated negotiation systems are some of the several examples of autonomous (artificial) agents that have pervaded our society. These agents enable the automation of multiple tasks, saving time and (human) effort. However, their presence in social settings raises the need for a better understanding of their effect on social interactions and how they may be used to enhance cooperation towards the public good, instead of hindering it. To...

Planned Analyses

Hans IJzerman, Nicolas Kaczmarek, Astrid Mignon, Amelie Rousseau & Charlotte Baey

Interpersonal stress as predictor of inflammation in adolescents: emotion regulation and heart rate variability as moderator?

Nathalie Michels
This study aims to examine the association of interpersonal stress (peer adversity and parental rejection) with inflammatory markers and the potential protective moderation by emotion regulation and parasympathetic nervous activity.

Plans

Sarah Kasran & Jan De Houwer
Registration of study aims, planned sample size, design, procedure, and data analysis plans prior to data collection.

Research data supporting the publication \"Characterization of Open-Cell Sponges via Magnetic Resonance and X-ray Tomography\"

Gabriele Cimmarusti, Abhishek Shastry, Matthieu N. Boone, Veerle Cnudde, Karl Braeckman, Anju Brooker, Eric Robles & Melanie Britton

4D oil and water flood in water- and mixed-wet complex sandstone

Arjen Mascini, Marijn Boone, Shan Wang, Stefanie Van Offenwert, Veerle Cnudde & Tom Bultreys

Spatial connectedness imposes local- and metapopulation-level selection on life history through feedbacks on demography

Stefano Masier & Dries Bonte
Dispersal evolution impacts the fluxes of individuals and hence, connectivity in metapopulations. Connectivity is therefore decoupled from the structural connectedness of the patches within the spatial network. Because of demographic feedbacks, local selection also drives the evolution of other life history traits. We investigated how different levels of connectedness affect trait evolution in experimental metapopulations of the two-spotted spider mite. We separated local- and metapopulation-level selection and linked trait divergence to population dynamics.

Flexible habitat choice by aphids exposed to multiple cues reflecting present and future benefits

Yin Wandong, Xue Qi, Tian Baoliang, Yang Shujian, Li Zhengying, Chen Zhaozhao, Ryan Michael & Hoffmann Ary
Mothers choose suitable habitats for laying offspring to maximize fitness. Since habitat quality varies in space and time, mothers gather information to choose among available habitats through multiple cues reflecting different aspects of habitat quality at present and in the future. However, it is unclear how females assess and integrate different cues associated with current rewards and future safety to optimize oviposition/larviposition decisions, especially across small spatial scales. Here we tested the individual and interactive...

Diatoms define a novel freshwater biogeography of the Antarctic

Bjorn Tytgat & Elie Verleyen
Terrestrial biota in the Antarctic are more globally distinct and highly structured biogeographically than previously believed, but information on biogeographic patterns and endemism in freshwater communities is largely lacking. We studied biogeographic patterns of Antarctic freshwater diatoms based on the analysis of species occurrences in a dataset of 439 lakes spread across the Antarctic realm. Highly distinct diatom floras, both in terms of composition and richness, characterize Continental Antarctica, Maritime Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic islands,...

How melanism affects the sensitivity of lizards to climate change

Jonathan Goldenberg, Sebastian Mader, Federico Massetti, Karen Bisschop, Liliana D'Alba, Rampal S. Etienne, Susana Clusella Trullas & Matthew Shawkey
The impact of climate change on global biodiversity is firmly established, but the differential effect of climate change on populations within the same species is rarely considered. In ectotherms, melanism (i.e. darker integument due to heavier deposition of melanin) can significantly influence thermoregulation, as dark individuals generally heat more and faster than bright ones. Therefore, darker ectotherms might be more susceptible to climate change. Using the color-polyphenic lizard Karusasaurus polyzonus (Squamata: Cordylidae), we hypothesized that,...

Phenotypic and genotypic divergence of plant-herbivore interactions along an urbanization gradient

Jiao Qu, Dries Bonte & Martijn L. Vandegehuchte
Urban environments provide challenging conditions for species survival, including increased temperatures, drought, and pollution. Species can deal with these conditions through evolution across generations or the immediate expression of phenotypic plasticity. The resulting phenotypic changes are key to the performance of species and their interactions with other species in the community. We here document patterns of herbivory in Arabidopsis thaliana along a rural-urban gradient, and tested the genetic background and ecological consequences of traits related...

Amplicon_sorter: a tool for reference-free amplicon sorting based on sequence similarity and for building consensus sequences

Andy Vierstraete & Bart Braeckman
Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) is a third-generation sequencing technology that is gaining popularity in ecological research for its portable and low-cost sequencing possibilities. Although the technology excels at long-read sequencing, it can also be applied to sequence amplicons. The downside of ONT is the low quality of the raw reads. Hence, generating a high-quality consensus sequence is still a challenge. We present Amplicon_sorter, a tool for reference-free sorting of ONT sequenced amplicons based on their...

Evaluating the effectiveness of implementation intentions to strengthen approach-avoidance training: Pilot study on alcohol use disorder

Nicolas Kaczmarek, Astrid Mignon, Amelie Rousseau & Charlotte Baey
This pre-registered study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of implementation intention to strengthen approach-avoidance training. It's a pilot study on alcohol use disorder.

Data from: Decision making for mitigating wildlife diseases: from theory to practice for an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians

Stefano Canessa, Claudio Bozzuto, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Sam S. Cruickshank, Matthew C. Fisher, Jacob C. Koella, Stefan Lötters, An Martel, Frank Pasmans, Benjamin C. Scheele, Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Sebastian Steinfartz, Benedikt R. Schmidt & Ben C. Scheele
1.Conservation science can be most effective in its decision-support role when seeking answers to clearly formulated questions of direct management relevance. Emerging wildlife diseases, a driver of global biodiversity loss, illustrate the challenges of performing this role: in spite of considerable research, successful disease mitigation is uncommon. Decision analysis is increasingly advocated to guide mitigation planning, but its application remains rare. 2.Using an integral projection model, we explored potential mitigation actions for avoiding population declines...

Data from: Influence of device accuracy and choice of algorithm for species distribution modelling of seabirds: a case study using black-browed albatrosses

Petra Quillfeldt, Jan O. Engler, Janet R. D. Silk, Richard A. Phillips & Janet R.D. Silk
Species distribution models (SDM) based on tracking data from different devices are used increasingly to explain and predict seabird distributions. However, different tracking methods provide different data resolutions, ranging from < 10m to >100km. To better understand the implications of this variation, we modeled the potential distribution of black-browed albatrosses Thalassarche melanophris from South Georgia that were simultaneously equipped with a Platform Terminal Transmitter (PTT) (high resolution) and a Global Location Sensor (GLS) logger (coarse...

Data from: Formin is associated with left-right asymmetry in the pond snail and the frog

Angus Davison, Gary S. McDowell, Jennifer M. Holden, Harriet F. Johnson, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, M. Maureen Liu, Paco Hulpiau, Frans Van Roy, Christopher M. Wade, Ruby Banerjee, Fengtang Yang, Satoshi Chiba, John W. Davey, Daniel J. Jackson, Michael Levin & Mark L. Blaxter
While components of the pathway that establishes left-right asymmetry have been identified in diverse animals, from vertebrates to flies, it is striking that the genes involved in the first symmetry-breaking step remain wholly unknown in the most obviously chiral animals, the gastropod snails. Previously, research on snails was used to show that left-right signaling of Nodal, downstream of symmetry breaking, may be an ancestral feature of the Bilateria. Here, we report that a disabling mutation...

Data from: Evolutionary shifts in the melanin-based color system of birds

Chad M. Eliason, Matthew D. Shawkey, Julia A. Clark & Julia A. Clarke
Melanin pigments contained in organelles (melanosomes) impart earthy colors to feathers. Such melanin-based colors are distributed across birds and thought to be the ancestral color-producing mechanism in birds. However, we have had limited data on melanin-based color and melanosome diversity in Palaeognathae, which includes the flighted tinamous and large-bodied, flightless ratites and is the sister taxon to all other extant birds. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry to assess melanosome morphology and quantify...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    26
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    38
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    26
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    27
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    20
  • 2017
    24
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    24
  • 2015
    32
  • 2014
    7
  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    211
  • Text
    23
  • Conference Paper
    3
  • Interactive Resource
    1

Affiliations

  • Ghent University
    226
  • KU Leuven
    25
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    16
  • University of Antwerp
    15
  • Universiteit Gent
    12
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    9
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    8
  • Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences
    8
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    7
  • University of Zurich
    6