24 Works

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Species interactions increase the temporal stability of community productivity in Pinus sylvestris-Fagus sylvatica mixtures across Europe

Miren Del Río, Hans Pretzsch, Ricardo Ruiz-Peinado, Evy Ampoorter, Peter Annighöfer, Ignacio Barbeito, Kamil Bielak, Gediminas Brazaitis, Lluis Coll, Lars össler, Marek Fabrika, David I. Forrester, Michael Heym, Václav Hurt, Viktor Kurylyak, Magnus Löf, Fabio Lombardi, Ekaterina Makrickiene, Bratislav Matovic, Frits Mohren, Renzo Motta, Jan Den Ouden, Maciej Pach, Quentin Ponette, Gerhard Schütze … & Lars Drössler
1.There is increasing evidence that species diversity enhances the temporal stability of community productivity in different ecosystems, although its effect at population and tree levels seems to be negative or neutral. Asynchrony in species responses to environmental conditions was found to be one of the main drivers of this stabilizing process. However, the effect of species mixing on the stability of productivity, and the relative importance of the associated mechanisms, remain poorly understood in forest...

Data from: The role of cognitive and affective empathy in spouses' support interactions: an observational study

Lesley L. Verhofstadt, Inge Devoldre, Ann Buysse, Michael Stevens, Celine Hinnekens, William Ickes & Mark Davis
The present study examined how support providers’ empathic dispositions (dispositional perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) as well as their situational empathic reactions (interaction-based perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) relate to the provision of spousal support during observed support interactions. Forty-five committed couples provided questionnaire data and participated in two ten-minute social support interactions designed to assess behaviors when partners are offering and soliciting social support. A video-review task was used to...

Data from: The evolution of eggshell cuticle in relation to nesting ecology

Liliana D'Alba, Rafael Maia, Mark E. Hauber & Matthew D. Shawkey
Avian eggs are at risk of microbial infection prior to and during incubation. A large number of defence mechanisms have evolved in response to the severe costs imposed by these infections. The eggshell's cuticle is an important component of antimicrobial defence, and its role in preventing contamination by microorganisms in domestic chickens is well known. Nanometer-scale cuticular spheres that reduce microbial attachment and penetration have recently been identified on eggs of several wild avian species....

Data from: Biodiversity as insurance for sapling survival in experimental tree plantations

Thomas Van De Peer, Kris Verheyen, Lander Baeten, Quentin Ponette & Bart Muys
Biodiversity can insure ecosystems against declines in their functioning by increasing the mean level of ecosystem processes and decreasing the spatial or temporal variance of these processes. On this basis, mixing tree species is expected to be an effective management strategy to reduce the risk of planting failure in young plantations. We examined the effects of biodiversity insurance on sapling survival in three tree diversity experiments across Belgium. Based on the survival scoring of 89...

Data from: Miocene flooding events of western Amazonia

Carlos Jaramillo, Ingrid Romero, Carlos D'Apolito, German Bayona, Edward Duarte, Stephen Louwye, Jaime Escobar, Javier Luque, Jorge D. Carrillo-Briceño, Vladimir Zapata, Andrés Mora, Stefan Schouten, Michael Zavada, Guy Harrington, John Ortiz & Frank P. Wesselingh
There is a considerable controversy about whether western Amazonia was ever covered by marine waters during the Miocene [23 to 5 Ma (million years ago)]. We investigated the possible occurrence of Miocene marine incursions in the Llanos and Amazonas/Solimões basins, using sedimentological and palynological data from two sediment cores taken in eastern Colombia and northwestern Brazil together with seismic information. We observed two distinct marine intervals in the Llanos Basin, an early Miocene that lasted...

Data from: The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses

Nicola S. Lewis, Colin A. Russell, Tavis K. Anderson, Kathryn Berger, David F. Burke, Judith M. Fonville, Ronald A.M. Fouchier, Paul Kellam, Bjorn F. Koel, Tung Nguyen, Bundit Nuansrichy, J. S. Malik Peiris, Takehiko Saito, Gaelle Simon, Eugene Skepner, Nobuhiro Takemae, ESNIP3 Consortium, Richard J. Webby, Kristien Van Reeth, Sharon M. Brookes, Lars Larsen, Ian H. Brown, Amy L. Vincent, Pinky Langat, Filip Bielejec … & JS Malik Peiris
Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the...

Data from: Warming affects different components of plant-herbivore interaction in a simplified community but not net interaction strength

Helena Van De Velde, Ivan Nijs & Dries Bonte
Global warming impacts natural communities through effects on performance of individual species and through changes in the strength of interactions between them. While there is a body of evidence of the former, we lack experimental evidence on potential changes in interaction strengths. Knowledge about multispecies interactions is fundamental to understand the regulation of biodiversity and the impact of climate change on communities. This study investigated the effect of warming on a simplified community consisting of...

Data from: Community assembly in Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish: quantifying the contributions of both niche-based and neutral processes

Thijs Janzen, Adriana Alzate, Moritz Muschick, Martine E. Maan, Fons Van Der Plas & Rampal S. Etienne
The cichlid family features some of the most spectacular examples of adaptive radiation. Evolutionary studies have highlighted the importance of both trophic adaptation and sexual selection in cichlid speciation. However, it is poorly understood what processes drive the composition and diversity of local cichlid species assemblages on relatively short, ecological timescales. Here, we investigate the relative importance of niche-based and neutral processes in determining the composition and diversity of cichlid communities inhabiting various environmental conditions...

Data from: The evolution of optimal emergence times: bet hedging and the quest for an ideal free temporal distribution of individuals

Hans Joachim Poethke, Thomas Hovestadt & Oliver Mitesser
Proper timing of activities is one of the principal challenges faced by most organisms. Organisms need to account for various aspects in decision making like avoiding inordinate risks, synchronizing with resource availability, or finding mates. We provide analytical and simulation models to investigate the influence of life expectancy, resource competition and unpredictable environmental conditions (environmental uncertainty) on the evolutionarily stable distribution of emergence times in organisms depending on seasonally available resources. We focus on the...

Data from: Highly diverse nirK genes comprise two major clades that harbour ammonium-producing denitrifiers

Helen Decleyre, Kim Heylen, Bjorn Tytgat & Anne Willems
Background: Copper dependent nitrite reductase, NirK, catalyses the key step in denitrification, i.e. nitrite reduction to nitric oxide. Distinct structural NirK classes and phylogenetic clades of NirK-type denitrifiers have previously been observed based on a limited set of NirK sequences, however, their environmental distribution or ecological strategies are currently unknown. In addition, environmental nirK-type denitrifiers are currently underestimated in PCR-dependent surveys due to primer coverage limitations that can be attributed to their broad taxonomic diversity...

Data from: Controlled fluorescence in a beetle's photonic structure and its sensitivity to environmentally induced changes

Sébastien R. Mouchet, Michaël Lobet, Branko Kolaric, Anna M. Kaczmarek, Rik Van Deun, Peter Vukusic, Olivier Deparis & Eloise Van Hooijdonk
The scales covering the elytra of the male Hoplia coerulea beetle contain fluorophores embedded within a porous photonic structure. The photonic structure controls both insect colour (reflected light) and fluorescence emission. Herein, the effects of water-induced changes on the fluorescence emission from the beetle were investigated. The fluorescence emission peak wavelength was observed to blue-shift on water immersion of the elytra whereas its reflectance peak wavelength was observed to red-shift. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements, together with...

Data from: Predictable food supplies induce plastic shifts in avian scaled body mass

Noraine Salleh Hudin, Diederik Strubbe, Aimeric Teyssier, Liesbeth De Neve, Joël White, Geert P. J. Janssens & Luc Lens
Urbanization constitutes one of the most profound forms of land-use change and strongly affects global biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Expansion of urban areas typically leads to species loss but may also induce more subtle changes in species dynamics through selection or plasticity. Using a dual correlative (field) and experimental (aviary) approach, we here show that free-ranging urban house sparrows in southern France were smaller and lighter than their rural counterparts after allometric scaling, whereas 2...

Data from: A longitudinal genetic survey identifies temporal shifts in the population structure of Dutch house sparrows

Laurence Cousseau, Martin Husemann, Ruud Foppen, Carl Vangestel & Luc Lens
Dutch house sparrow (Passer domesticus) densities dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1980s, and similar collapses in population sizes have been reported across Europe. Whether, and to what extent, such relatively recent demographic changes are accompanied by concomitant shifts in the genetic population structure of this species needs further investigation. Therefore, we here explore temporal shifts in genetic diversity, genetic structure and effective sizes of seven Dutch house sparrow populations. To allow the most...

Data from: Behavioral adaptations imply a direct link between ecological specialization and reproductive isolation in a sympatrically diverging ground beetle

Steven M. Van Belleghem, Katrien De Wolf & Frederik Hendrickx
Adaptation to a previously unoccupied niche within a single population is one of the most contentious topics in evolutionary biology as it assumes the simultaneous evolution of ecologically selected and preference traits. Here, we demonstrate behavioral adaptation to contrasting hydrological regimes in a sympatric mosaic of Pogonus chalceus beetle populations, and argue that this adaptation may result in nonrandom gene flow. When exposed to experimental inundations, individuals from tidal marshes, which are naturally subjected to...

Data from: Metabolic adaptations in a range-expanding arthropod

Katrien H. P. Van Petegem, David Renault, Robby Stoks & Dries Bonte
Despite an increasing number of studies documenting life-history evolution during range expansions or shifts, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the underlying physiological processes. In this explorative study, we used a metabolomics approach to study physiological changes associated with the recent range expansion of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Mite populations were sampled along a latitudinal gradient from range core to edge and reared under benign common garden conditions for two generations. Using gas...

Data from: Measuring the biodiversity of microbial communities by flow cytometry

Ruben Props, Pieter Monsieurs, Mohamed Mysara, Lieven Clement & Nico Boon
1. Measuring the microbial diversity in natural and engineered environments is important for ecosystem characterization, ecosystem monitoring and hypothesis testing. Although the conventional assessment through single marker gene surveys has resulted in major advances, the complete procedure remains slow (i.e., weeks to months), labour-intensive and susceptible to multiple sources of laboratory and data processing bias. Growing interest, in highly resolved, temporal surveys of microbial diversity, necessitates rapid, inexpensive and robust analytical platforms that require limited...

Data from: Evolutionary shifts in the melanin-based color system of birds

Chad M. Eliason, Matthew D. Shawkey, Julia A. Clark & Julia A. Clarke
Melanin pigments contained in organelles (melanosomes) impart earthy colors to feathers. Such melanin-based colors are distributed across birds and thought to be the ancestral color-producing mechanism in birds. However, we have had limited data on melanin-based color and melanosome diversity in Palaeognathae, which includes the flighted tinamous and large-bodied, flightless ratites and is the sister taxon to all other extant birds. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry to assess melanosome morphology and quantify...

Data from: Formin is associated with left-right asymmetry in the pond snail and the frog

Angus Davison, Gary S. McDowell, Jennifer M. Holden, Harriet F. Johnson, Georgios D. Koutsovoulos, M. Maureen Liu, Paco Hulpiau, Frans Van Roy, Christopher M. Wade, Ruby Banerjee, Fengtang Yang, Satoshi Chiba, John W. Davey, Daniel J. Jackson, Michael Levin & Mark L. Blaxter
While components of the pathway that establishes left-right asymmetry have been identified in diverse animals, from vertebrates to flies, it is striking that the genes involved in the first symmetry-breaking step remain wholly unknown in the most obviously chiral animals, the gastropod snails. Previously, research on snails was used to show that left-right signaling of Nodal, downstream of symmetry breaking, may be an ancestral feature of the Bilateria. Here, we report that a disabling mutation...

Data from: Selection, constraint and the evolution of coloration in African starlings

Rafael Maia, Dustin R. Rubenstein & Matthew D. Shawkey
Colorful plumage plays a prominent role in evolution of birds, influencing communication (sexual/social selection) and crypsis (natural selection). Comparative studies have focused primarily upon these selective pressures, but the mechanisms underlying color production can also be important by constraining the color gamut upon which selection acts. Iridescence is particularly interesting to study the interaction between selection and color-producing mechanisms because a broad range of colors can be produced with a shared template, and innovations to...

Data from: Poor adherence to guidelines for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI): results of a worldwide survey

Naïma Hammami, Marie-Laurence Lambert, Cristina Valencia, Antonella Agodi, Alain Lepape, Eduardo Palencia Herrejon, Stijn Blot & Jean-Louis Vincent
Background: Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) are a cause of increased morbidity and mortality, and are largely preventable. We documented attitudes and practices in intensive care units (ICUs) in 2015 in order to assess compliance with CLABSI prevention guidelines. Methods: Between June and October 2015, an online questionnaire was made available to medical doctors and nurses working in ICUs worldwide. We investigated practices related to central line (CL) insertion, maintenance and measurement of CLABSI-related data...

Data from: The third dimension: a novel set-up for filming coelacanths in their natural environment

Thierry Décamps, Anthony Herrel, Laurent Ballesta, Florian Holon, Thibault Rauby, Yannick Gentil, Cédric Gentil, Hugo Dutel, Regis Debruyne, Jean-Benoit Charrassin, Guillaume Eveillard, Gaël Clément & Marc Herbin
Here, we describe a novel design to obtain three-dimensional data on the movements of aquatic organisms at depths of up to 140 m. The set-up consists of two synchronized high-speed cameras fixed to two articulated arms. The set-up was successfully used to film and quantify the locomotion of coelacanths Latimeria chalumnae living at a depth of about 120 m in Sodwana Bay, South Africa. As an example, the detailed motion of the dorsal fin is...

Data from: Associations among elementary school children's actual motor competence, perceived motor competence, physical activity and BMI: a cross-sectional study

An De Meester, David Stodden, Ali Brian, Larissa True, Greet Cardon, Isabel Tallir & Leen Haerens
Background: Positive associations between motor competence and physical activity have been identified by means of variable-centered analyses. To expand the understanding of these associations, this study used a person-centered approach to investigate whether different combinations (i.e., profiles) of actual and perceived motor competence exist (aim 1); and to examine differences in physical activity levels (aim 2) and weight status (aim 3) among children with different motor competence-based profiles. Methods: Children's (N=361; Boys=50%; Mage=9.50±1.24yrs) actual motor...

Data from: Getting to the heart of emotion regulation in youth: the role of interoceptive sensitivity, heart rate variability, and parental psychopathology

Nele A. J. De Witte, Stefan Sütterlin, Caroline Braet & Sven C. Mueller
Emotion regulation and associated autonomic activation develop throughout childhood and adolescence under the influence of the family environment. Specifically, physiological indicators of autonomic nervous system activity such as interoceptive sensitivity and vagally mediated heart rate variability (HRV) can inform on emotion regulation. Although the effect of parental emotion socialization on emotion regulation appears to be influenced by autonomic processes, research on physiological regulation and the influence of parental factors remains scarce. This study investigated the...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • Ghent University
    24
  • KU Leuven
    3
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • Columbia University
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Tohoku University
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Göttingen
    2
  • Wellcome Trust
    2
  • University of Akron
    2