27 Works

Because You Had a Bad Day: General and Daily Relations between Reactive Temperament, Emotion Regulation, and Depressive Symptoms in Youth

Marie-Lotte Van Beveren, Sofie Kuppens, Benjamin Hankin & Caroline Braet
Negative emotionality (NE) and positive emotionality (PE) have repeatedly shown to act as vulnerability factors for youth depression. Less research examined the mechanisms through which these reactive temperament traits may differently confer vulnerability to depression. Based on recent integrated models of depression proposing emotion regulation as a key underlying mechanism, the current study aimed to clarify the general and day-to-day relations among temperament, emotion regulation strategies, and depressive symptoms in Dutch-speaking youth (35% boys; M_age...

A preliminary field trial to compare control techniques for invasive Berberis aquifolium in Belgian coastal dunes

Tim Adriaens, Pieter Verschelde, Emma Cartuyvels, Bram D'hondt, Edward Vercruysse, Wouter Van Gompel, Evy Dewulf & Sam Provoost
Non-native Berberis aquifolium is notoriously invasive in Belgian coastal dunes. With its strong clonal growth through suckers, this evergreen shrub outcompetes native species and affects dune succession. To prevent further secondary spread and mitigate its impact, there was an urgent need for knowledge on the effectiveness of control measures, both at the plant and habitat level. Here, we report on a first control experiment. Individual B. aquifolium clones were subjected to one of four treatments...

Data from: Induced phenological avoidance: a neglected defense mechanism against seed predation in plants

Bram Sercu, Iris Moeneclaey, Dries Bonte & Lander Baeten
1. Flowering phenology is an important life history trait affecting plant reproductive performance and is influenced by various abiotic and biotic factors. Pre-dispersal seed predation and pollination are expected to impose counteracting selection pressure on flowering phenology, with pre-dispersal seed predation expected to favor off-peak flowering and pollination to favor synchronous flowering. 2. Here we studied the effect of pre-dispersal seed predation by the beetle Byturus ochraceus, a specialist seed herbivore, on the flowering phenology...

Data from: Stressor fluxes alter the relationship between beta-diversity and regional productivity

Jonathan De Raedt, Jan M. Baert, Colin R. Janssen & Frederik De Laender
Dispersal of organisms can influence the relationship between beta-diversity and regional productivity in heterogeneous environments. However, many ecosystems are also linked by fluxes of stressors, with an unknown influence on this relationship. In this study, we assess the relationship between beta-diversity (measured as Bray-Curtis dissimilarity) and regional productivity (measured as biovolume) under various levels of a stressor flux in meta-ecosystems that were composed of two marine micro-algae communities. We created heterogeneity by exposing one of...

Spatial connectedness imposes local- and metapopulation-level selection on life history through feedbacks on demography

Stefano Masier & Dries Bonte
Dispersal evolution impacts the fluxes of individuals and hence, connectivity in metapopulations. Connectivity is therefore decoupled from the structural connectedness of the patches within the spatial network. Because of demographic feedbacks, local selection also drives the evolution of other life history traits. We investigated how different levels of connectedness affect trait evolution in experimental metapopulations of the two-spotted spider mite. We separated local- and metapopulation-level selection and linked trait divergence to population dynamics.

Flexible habitat choice by aphids exposed to multiple cues reflecting present and future benefits

Yin Wandong, Xue Qi, Tian Baoliang, Yang Shujian, Li Zhengying, Chen Zhaozhao, Ryan Michael & Hoffmann Ary
Mothers choose suitable habitats for laying offspring to maximize fitness. Since habitat quality varies in space and time, mothers gather information to choose among available habitats through multiple cues reflecting different aspects of habitat quality at present and in the future. However, it is unclear how females assess and integrate different cues associated with current rewards and future safety to optimize oviposition/larviposition decisions, especially across small spatial scales. Here we tested the individual and interactive...

The distribution of plant consumption traits across habitat types and the patterns of fruit availability suggest a mechanism of coexistence of two sympatric frugivorous mammals

Luc Roscelin Dongmo Tédonzong, Jacob Willie, Nikki Tagg, Martin N. Tchamba, Tsi Evaristus Angwafo, Ada Myriane Patipe Keuko, Jacques Keumo Kuenbou, Charles-Albert Petre & Luc Lens
Understanding the mechanisms governing the coexistence of organisms is an important question in ecology, and providing potential solutions contributes to conservation science. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of several mechanisms to the coexistence of two sympatric frugivores, using western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) in a tropical rainforest of southeast Cameroon as a model system. We collected great ape fecal samples to determine and classify fruit species...

Optimal foraging explains novel movement behavior of benthic diatoms

Wen-Si Hu, Ming-Ji Huang, H.P. Zhang, Feng Zhang, Wim Vyverman & Quan-Xing Liu
Adaptive locomotion of living organisms contributes to their competitive abilities and helps maintain their fitness in diverse environments. To date, however, our understanding of searching behavior and its ultimate cause remains poorly understood in ecology and biology. Here, we investigate motion patterns of biofilm-inhabiting marine raphid diatom Navicula arenaria var. rostellata in two-dimensional space. We report that individual Navicula cells display a “circular-run-and-reversal” movement behavior at different concentrations of dissolved silicic acid (dSi). We show...

Data from: High ecosystem service delivery potential of small woodlands in agricultural landscapes

Alicia Valdés, Jonathan Lenoir, Pieter De Frenne, Emilie Andrieu, Jorg Brunet, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara Cousins, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Martin Diekmann, Steffen Ehrmann, Emilie Gallet-Moron, Stefanie Gaertner, Brice Giffard, Karin Hansen, Martin Hermy, Annette Kolb, Vincent Leroux, Jaan Liira, Jessica Lindgren, Ludmilla Martin, Tobias Naaf, Taavi Paal, Willem Proesmans, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen … & Guillaume Decocq
Global forest loss and fragmentation have strongly increased the frequency of forest patches smaller than a few hectares. Little is known about the biodiversity and ecosystem service supply potential of such small woodlands in comparison to larger forests. As it is widely recognized that high biodiversity levels increase ecosystem functionality and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services, small, isolated woodlands are expected to have a lower potential for ecosystem service delivery than large forests hosting...

Mechanisms for color convergence in a mimetic radiation of poison frogs

Evan Twomey, Morgan Kain, Myriam Claeys, Kyle Summers, Santiago Castroviejo-Fisher & Ines Van Bocxlaer
In animals, bright colors often evolve to mimic other species when a resemblance is selectively favored. Understanding the proximate mechanisms underlying such color mimicry can give insights into how mimicry evolves, for example, whether color convergence evolves from a shared set of mechanisms or through the evolution of novel color production mechanisms. We studied color production mechanisms in poison frogs (Dendrobatidae), focusing on the mimicry complex of Ranitomeya imitator. Using reflectance spectrometry, skin pigment analysis,...

Data from: Sharing the burden: on the division of parental care and vocalizations during incubation

Marwa M. Kavelaars, Luc Lens & Wendt Müller
In species with biparental care, individuals only have to pay the costs for their own parental investment, while the contribution of their partner comes for free. Each parent hence benefits if its partner works harder, creating an evolutionary conflict of interest. How parents resolve this conflict and how they achieve the optimal division of parental tasks often remains elusive. In this study, we investigated whether lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) divide parental care during incubation...

Data from: Long-term recovery of the functional community assembly and carbon pools in an African tropical forest succession

Marijn Bauters, Oscar Vercleyen, Bernard Vanlauwe, Johan Six, Bernard Bonyoma, Henri Badjoko, Wannes Hubau, Alison Hoyt, Mathieu Boudin, Hans Verbeeck & Pascal Boeckx.
On the African continent, the population is expected to expand fourfold in the next century, which will increasingly impact the global carbon cycle and biodiversity conservation. Therefore, it is of vital importance to understand how carbon stocks and community assembly recover after slash-and-burn events in tropical second-growth forests. We inventoried a chronosequence of 15 1-hectare plots in lowland tropical forest of the central Congo Basin and evaluated changes in aboveground and soil organic carbon stocks...

WordCrowd – A Location-Based Application to Explore the City based on Geo-Social Media and Semantics

Kenzo Milleville, Dilawar Ali, Francisco Porras-Bernardez, Steven Verstockt, Nico Van de Weghe & Georg Gartner

Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests

Wannes Hubau, Simon Lewis, Oliver Phillips, Kofi Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Hans Hans Beeckman, Aida Cuni-Sanchez, Corneille Ewango, Sophie Fauset, Douglas Sheil, Bonaventure Sonké, Martin Sullivan, Terry Sunderland, Sean Thomas, Katharine Abernethy, Stephen Adu-Bredu, Christian Amani, Timothy Baker, Lindsay Banin, Fidèle Baya, Serge Begne, Amy Bennett, Fabrice Benedet, Robert Bitariho & Yannick Bocko
Data and R-code from Hubau W et al. 2020. 'Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests'. Nature 579, 80-87. 2020. DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-2035-0. ABSTRACT: Structurally intact tropical forests sequestered ~50% of global terrestrial carbon uptake over the 1990s and early 2000s, offsetting ~15% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions1-3. Climate-driven vegetation models typically predict that this tropical forest ‘carbon sink’ will continue for decades4,5. However, recent inventories of intact Amazonian forests show declining...

Adapting the Type of Indoor Route Instruction to the Decision Point

Laure De Cock, Kristien Ooms, Nico Van de Weghe & Philippe De Maeyer

Saturated solute transport micro-CT dataset in sintered glass and Bentheimer sandstone

Stefanie Van Offenwert, Tom Bultreys & Veerle Cnudde
This dataset was used in the study of Van Offenwert et al. (2019). It contains time-resolved laboratory-based micro-CT images of saturated solute injection experiments in sintered glass and Bentheimer sandstone. Based on the grey values in the resolved pore space, pore-scale concentration fields can be quantified. To estimate its uncertainty, calibration scans where the pores were saturated with a known tracer (CsCl) concentration were performed at 12 s per scan with a voxel size of...

Data from: Establishment of wildflower fields in poor quality landscapes enhances micro-parasite prevalence in wild bumble bees

Niels Piot, Ivan Meeus, David Kleijn, Jeroen Scheper, Theo Linders & Guy Smagghe
The current worldwide pollinator decline is caused by the interplay of different drivers. Several strategies have been undertaken to counteract or halt this decline, one of which is the implementation of wildflower fields. These supplementary flowers provide extra food resources and have proven their success in increasing pollinator biodiversity and abundance. Yet such landscape alterations could also alter the host–pathogen dynamics of pollinators, which could affect the populations. In this study, we investigated the influence...

Tree diversity is key for promoting the diversity and abundance of forest‐associated taxa in Europe

Eric Allan, Evy Ampoorter, Luc Barbaro, Hervé Jactel, Lander Baeten, Johanna Boberg, Monique Carnol, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Seid Muhie Dawud, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Hans De Wandeler, Virginie Guyot, Stephan Hättenschwiler, François‐Xavier Joly, Julia Koricheva, Harriet Milligan, Bart Muys, Diem Nguyen, Sophia Ratcliffe, Karsten Raulund‐Rasmussen, Michael Scherer‐Lorenzen, Fons Plas, J. Van Keer … & Lars Vesterdal
Plant diversity is an important driver of diversity at other trophic levels, suggesting that cascading extinctions could reduce overall biodiversity. Most evidence for positive effects of plant diversity comes from grasslands. Despite the fact that forests are hotspots of biodiversity, the importance of tree diversity, in particular its relative importance compared to other management related factors, in affecting forest‐associated taxa is not well known. To address this, we used data from 183 plots, located in...

Female need for paternal care shapes variation in extra-pair paternity in a cooperative breeder

Laurence Cousseau, Dries Van De Loock, Mwangi Githiru, Carl Vangestel & Luc Lens
Socially-monogamous females regularly mate with males outside the pair bond. The prevailing explanation for this behavior is that females gain genetic benefits resulting from increased fitness of extra-pair offspring. Furthermore, because of the risk of reduced paternal care in response to cuckoldry, females are expected to seek extra-pair copulations when they can rear offspring with little help from their social partner (“constrained female” hypothesis). We tested these hypotheses and analyzed variation in paternal care in...

Data from: Comparative crystallography suggests maniraptoran theropod affinities for latest Cretaceous European ‘geckoid’ eggshell

Seung Choi, Edina Prondvai, Miguel Moreno‐Azanza, Zoltán Csiki‐Sava & Yuong‐Nam Lee
Thin fossil eggshells from Upper Cretaceous deposits of Europe, characterized by nodular ornamentation similar to modern gekkotan eggshells, have mostly been interpreted as gekkotan (=‘geckoid’) in origin. However, in some cases, like the oogenus Pseudogeckoolithus, their theropod affinity was also suggested. The true affinity of these fossil ‘geckoid’ eggshells remained controversial due to the absence of analytical methods effective in identifying genuine gecko eggshells in the fossil record. In this study, we apply electron backscatter...

Data from: Fear of the dark? contrasting impacts of humans vs lynx on diel activity of roe deer across Europe

Nadège C. Bonnot, Ophélie Couriot, Anne Berger, Francesca Cagnacci, Simone Ciuti, Johannes De Groeve, Benedikt Gehr, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, Max Kröschel, Nicolas Morellet, Leif Sönnichsen & A.J. Mark Hewison
Humans, as super predators, can have strong effects on wildlife behaviour, including profound modifications of diel activity patterns. Subsequent to the return of large carnivores to human-modified ecosystems, many prey species have adjusted their spatial behaviour to the contrasting landscapes of fear generated by both their natural predators and anthropogenic pressures. The effects of predation risk on temporal shifts in diel activity of prey, however, remain largely unexplored in human-dominated landscapes. We investigated the influence...

Data from: Which frugivory‐related traits facilitated historical long‐distance dispersal in the custard apple family (Annonaceae)?

Renske E. Onstein, W. Daniel Kissling, Lars W. Chatrou, Thomas L. P. Couvreur, Hélène Morlon & Hervé Sauquet
Aim Long-distance dispersal has contributed to the disjunct biogeographical distribution of rain forest plants – something that has fascinated biogeographers since Humboldt’s time. However, the dispersal ‘agent’ for these tropical plant lineages remains puzzling. Here, we investigate which frugivory-related traits may have facilitated past intercontinental long-distance dispersal in the custard apple family (Annonaceae), a major vertebrate-dispersed tropical plant family. We hypothesize that long-distance dispersal was associated with the evolution of traits related to dispersal by...

Data from: Testing the divergent adaptation of two congeneric tree species on a rainfall gradient using eco-physio-morphological traits

Anaïs-Pasiphaé Gorel, Kathy Steppe, Hans Beeckman, Niels J.F. De Baerdemaeker, Jean-Louis Doucet, Gauthier Ligot, Kasso Daïnou & Adeline Fayolle.
In tropical Africa, evidence of widely distributed genera transcending biomes or habitat boundaries has been reported. The evolutionary processes that allowed these lineages to disperse and adapt into new environments are far from being resolved. To better understand these processes, we propose an integrated approach, based on the eco-physio-morphological traits of two sister species with adjacent distributions along a rainfall gradient. We used wood anatomical traits, plant hydraulics (vulnerability to cavitation, wood volumetric water content...

The hornwort genome and early land plant evolution

Jian Zhang, Xin-Xing Fu, Rui-Qi Li, Xiang Zhao, Yang Liu, Ming-He Li, Arthur Zwaenepoel, Hong Ma, Bernard Goffinet, Yan-Long Guan, Jia-Yu Xue, Yi-Ying Liao, Qing-Feng Wang, Qing-Hua Wang, Jie-Yu Wang, Guo-Qiang Zhang, Zhi-Wen Wang, Yu Jia, Mei-Zhi Wang, Shan-Shan Dong, Jian-Fen Yang, Yuan-Nian Jiao, Ya-Long Guo, Hong-Zhi Kong, An-Ming Lu … & Zhi-Duan Chen
Hornworts, liverworts, and mosses are three early diverging clades of land plants, together composing the bryophytes. Here we report the draft genome sequence of the hornwort Anthoceros angustus. Phylogenomic inferences confirm the monophyly of bryophytes, with hornworts sister to liverworts and mosses. The simple morphology of hornworts correlates with low genetic redundancy in plant body plan while the basic transcriptional regulation toolkit for plant development has already been established in this early land plant lineage....

Signal evolution and morphological complexity in hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae)

Chad Eliason, Rafael Maia, Juan Parra & Matthew Shawkey
Understanding how animal signals are produced is critical for understanding their evolution because complexity and modularity in the underlying morphology can affect evolutionary patterns. Hummingbird feathers show some of the brightest and most iridescent colors in nature. These are produced by optically complex stacks of hollow, platelet-shaped organelles called melanosomes. Neither how these morphologies produce colors nor their evolution has been systematically studied. We first used nanoscale morphological measurements and optical modeling to identify the...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    27

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24
  • Text
    3

Affiliations

  • Ghent University
    27
  • Royal Museum for Central Africa
    3
  • University of Antwerp
    2
  • University of Liège
    2
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    2
  • University of Freiburg
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • KU Leuven
    2
  • Henan University
    1
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
    1