26 Works

Saturated solute transport micro-CT dataset in Savonnières limestone

Stefanie Van Offenwert, Tom Bultreys, Marijn Boone & Veerle Cnudde

Nitrogen and brine injected into Estaillades carbonate - steady-state experiments

Catherine Spurin, Samuel Krevor, Martin Blunt & Tom Bultreys
This data is micro-CT images of the simultaneous injection of nitrogen and brine into a porous carbonate rock (Estaillades). The images were acquired during steady-state, which was deduced from a plateau in the differential pressure across the sample. The experiments were conducted in the capillary dominated regime (the total flow rate was kept constant, with the fractional flow (fw) changed in sequence 0.85fw, 0.7fw, 0.5fw, 0.25fw, 0.03fw, 0fw). There is the high Ca experiment where...

Data from: Canonical correlations reveal adaptive loci and phenotypic responses to climate in perennial ryegrass

José L. Blanco-Pastor, Philippe Barre, Thomas Keep, Thomas Ledauphin, Abraham Escobar-Gutiérrez, Anna Maria Roschanski, Evelyn Willner, Klaus Dehmer, Matthew Hegarty, Hilde Muylle, Elisabeth Veeckman, Klaas Vandepoele, Tom Ruttink, Isabel Roldán-Ruiz, Stéphanie Manel & Jean-Paul Sampoux
Germplasm from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) natural populations is useful for breeding because of its adaptation to a wide range of climates. Climate-adaptive genes can be detected from associations between genotype, phenotype and climate but an integrated framework for the analysis of these three sources of information is lacking. We used two approaches to identify adaptive loci in perennial ryegrass and their effect on phenotypic traits. First, we combined Genome-Environment Association (GEA) and GWAS...

A metacommunity approach for detecting species influenced by mass effect

Thibault Leboucher, Juliette Tison-Rosebery, William R. Budnick, Aurélien Jamoneau, Wim Vyverman, Janne Soininen, Sébastien Boutry & Sophia I. Passy
1. Mass effect, allowing species to persist in unfavourable habitats, and dispersal limitation, preventing species from reaching favourable habitats, are the two major dispersal processes. While dispersal limitation can be detected by experimental or modeling techniques, mass effect is more challenging to evaluate, which hampers our ability to disentangle the influence of the environment vs. dispersal on species distribution. This is undesirable for biomonitoring programs built on known species-environment relationships. 2. We developed an approach...

Species-specific effects of thermal stress on the expression of genetic variation across a diverse group of plant and animal taxa under experimental conditions

Klaus Fischer, Jürgen Kreyling, Michaël Beaulieu, Ilka Beil, Manuela Bog, Dries Bonte, Stefanie Holm, Sabine Knoblauch, Dustin Koch, Lena Muffler, Pierick Mouginot, Maria Paulinich, J.F. Scheepens, Raijana Schiemann, Jonas Schmeddes, Martin Schnittler, Gabriele Uhl, Marieke Van Der Maaten-Theunissen, Julia M. Weier, Martin Wilmking, Robert Weigel & Phillip Gienapp
Assessing the genetic adaptive potential of populations and species is essential for better understanding evolutionary processes. However, the expression of genetic variation may depend on environmental conditions, which may speed up or slow down evolutionary responses. Thus, the same selection pressure may lead to different responses. Against this background, we here investigate the effects of thermal stress on genetic variation, mainly under controlled laboratory conditions. We estimated additive genetic variance (VA), narrow-sense heritability (h2), and...

Forest microclimate dynamics drive plant responses to warming

Florian Zellweger, Pieter De Frenne & David Coomes
Climate warming is causing a shift in biological communities in favor of warm-affinity species (i.e., thermophilisation). However, species responses often lag behind climate warming and local microclimates modulated by vegetation and topography are usually ignored. Here we analyze multidecadal understorey microclimate dynamics in European forests and show that thermophilisation and the climatic lag in forest plant communities are primarily controlled by microclimate. Increasing tree canopy cover reduces warming rates inside forests, but loss of canopy...

Chytrid Fungi and Nitrile Gloves Research Data

Valarie Thomas, Pascale Van Rooij, Celine Meerpoel, Gwij Stegen, Jella Wauters, Lynn Vanhaecke, An Martel & Frank Pasmans
To prevent transmission of the pathogenic chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), hygiene protocols prescribe the single use of disposable gloves for handling amphibians. We discovered that rinse water from nitrile gloves instantly kills 99% of Bd and Bsal zoospores. Transmission experiments using midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) and Bd, and Alpine newts (Ichthyosaura alpestris) and Bsal, show that the use of the same pair of gloves for 2 subsequent individuals does not...

Belgian Fieldstone

Tom Bultreys & Wesley De Boever

Large-Eddy Simulations of T-shaped Open-Channel Confluences With Different Downstream Channel Widths

Pedro Xavier Ramos, Laurent Schindfessel, João Pedro Pêgo & Tom De Mulder
Confluences of open-channel flows are common in nature as well as in urban drainage networks and in hydraulic structures. The complex hydrodynamics is often studied in schematized, right-angled confluences. In this paper, the influence of the downstream channel width onto time-averaged and turbulent flow features will be investigated numerically, based on Large-Eddy Simulations. For one flow situation, i.e. flow ratio and downstream Froude number, two geometries will be compared: a discordant width case, which was...

The neglected impact of tracking devices on terrestrial arthropods

Femke Batsleer, Dries Bonte, Daan Dekeukeleire, Steven Goossens, Ward Poelmans, Eliane Van Der Cruyssen, Dirk Maes & Martijn L. Vandegehuchte
Tracking devices have become small enough to be widely applied to arthropods to study their movement. However, possible side effects of these devices on arthropod performance and behaviour are rarely considered. We performed a systematic review of 173 papers about research in which tracking devices –Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), harmonic radar, and radio telemetry tags– were attached to terrestrial arthropods. The impact of such tags was quantified in only 12% of the papers, while in...

Data from: Microclimate limits thermal behaviour favourable to disease control in a nocturnal amphibian

Wouter Beukema, Frank Pasmans, Sarah Van Praet, Francisco Ferri-Yáñez, Moira Kelly, Alexandra Laking, Jesse Erens, Jeroen Speybroeck, Kris Verheyen, Luc Lens & An Martel
While epizootics increasingly affect wildlife, it remains poorly understood how the environment shapes most host-pathogen systems. Here, we employ a three-step framework to study microclimate influence on ectotherm host thermal behaviour, focusing on amphibian chytridiomycosis in fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra) infected with the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal). Laboratory trials reveal that innate variation in thermal preference, rather than behavioural fever, can inhibit infection and facilitate salamander recovery under humidity-saturated conditions. Yet, a three-year field...

Reconciling seascape genetics and fisheries science in three co-distributed flatfishes

Sara Vandamme, Joost Raeymaekers, Filip Volckaert, Gregory Maes, Karl Cottenie, Eveline Diopere & Federico Calboli
Uncertainty hampers innovative mixed-fisheries management by the scales at which connectivity dynamics are relevant to management objectives. The spatial scale of sustainable stock management is species-specific and depends on ecology, life history and population connectivity. One valuable approach to understand these spatial scales is to determine to what extent population genetic structure correlates with the oceanographic environment. Here we compare the level of genetic connectivity in three co-distributed and commercially exploited demersal flatfish species living...

Multiscale drivers of carabid beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in small European woodlands

Ronan Marrec, Vincent Le Roux, Ludmilla Martin, Jonathan Lenoir, Jörg Brunet, Sara Cousins, Pallieter De Smedt, Marc Deconchat, Martin Diekmann, Steffen Ehrmann, Emilie Gallet-Moron, Brice Giffard, Jaan Liira, Jessica Lindgren, Alicia Valdés, Kris Verheyen, Monika Wulf & Guillaume Decocq
Aim The spatiotemporal connectivity of forest patches in lowland agricultural landscapes and their age matter to explain current biodiversity patterns across regional as well as biogeographical extents, to the point that it exceeds the contribution of macroclimate for plant diversity in the understory of temperate forests. Whether this holds true for other taxonomic groups remains largely unknown. Yet, it has important consequences for ecosystem functioning and the delivery of ecosystem services. Focusing on carabid beetle...

Global biogeography and diversification of a group of brown seaweeds (Phaeophyceae) driven by clade-specific evolutionary processes

Christophe Vieira, Frederique Steen, Sofie D'hondt, Quinten Bafort, Cindy Fernandez-García, Brian Wysor, Lennert Tyberghein, Ana Tronholm, Lydiane Mattio, Claude Payri, Gary Saunders, Frederik Leliaert, Heroen Verbruggen & Olivier De Clerck
Aim: Historical processes that shaped current diversity patterns of seaweeds remain poorly understood. Using Dictyotales, a globally distributed order of brown seaweeds as a model, we test if historical biogeographical and diversification patterns are comparable across clades. Dictyotales contain some 22 genera, three of which, Dictyota, Lobophora and Padina, are exceptionally diverse. Specifically we test if the evolutionary processes in these clades that shaped their latitudinal diversity patterns are in line with the tropical conservatism,...

Diapause is not selected as a bet-hedging strategy in insects: a meta-analysis of reaction norm shapes

Jens Joschinski & Dries Bonte
Many organisms escape from lethal climatological conditions by entering a resistant resting stage called diapause, and it is essential that this strategy remains optimally timed with seasonal change. Climate change therefore exerts selection pressure on phenology, which is expected to cause the evolution of mean diapause timing, but also phenotypic plasticity and bet-hedging strategies. Especially the latter as a strategy to cope with unpredictability is so far little considered in the context of climate change,...

Reduced stress defense responses contribute to the higher toxicity of a pesticide under warming

Vienna Delnat, Janne Swaegers, Jana Asselman & Robby Stoks
There is a pressing need to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the, often magnifying, interactive effects between contaminants and natural stressors. We here test our hypothesis that lower general stress defense responses contribute to synergistic interactions between stressors. We focus on the widespread pattern that many contaminants are more toxic at higher temperatures. Specifically, we tested the effects of an environmentally realistic low-effect and high-effect concentration of the pesticide chlorpyrifos under warming at the gene...

L’Union européenne, puissance normative dans l’océan Indien. Les îles de l’océan Indien face au défi du libre-échange

Erwan Lannon
L’Union européenne a récemment conclu avec Madagascar, Maurice, les Seychelles et Singapour, et négocie actuellement avec l’Indonésie, des accords de libre-échange. La mise en oeuvre de ces accords préférentiels implique une intégration économique progressive accompagnée d’une convergence normative et réglementaire plus ou moins développée. Cette mise à niveau est exigeante car il s’agit d’adopter des normes et standards et de respecter des règles précises dans le domaine des investissements, de la concurrence, ou encore de...

Raw micro-CT data of solute transport in porous media

Stefanie Van Offenwert , , &

Support for the habitat amount hypothesis from a global synthesis of species density studies

James Watling, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Marion Pfeifer, Lander Baeten, Cristina Banks-Leite, Laura Cisneros, Rebecca Fang, Caroli Hamel-Leigue, Thibault Lachat, Inara Leal, Luc Lens, Hugh Possingham, Dinarzarde Raheem, Danilo Ribeiro, Eleanor Slade, Nicolas Urbina-Cardona, Eric Wood & Lenore Fahrig
Decades of research suggest that species richness depends on spatial characteristics of habitat patches, especially their size and isolation. In contrast, the habitat amount hypothesis predicts that: 1) species richness in plots of fixed size (species density) is more strongly and positively related to the amount of habitat around the plot than to patch size or isolation; 2) habitat amount better predicts species density than patch size and isolation combined, 3) there is no effect...

The role of preadaptation, propagule pressure and competition in the colonization of new habitats

Adriana Alzate Vallejo, Renske Onstein, Rampal S. Etienne & Dries Bonte
To successfully colonize new habitats, organisms not only need to gain access to it, they also need to cope with the selective pressures imposed by the local biotic and abiotic conditions. The number of immigrants, the preadaptation to the local habitat and the presence of competitors are important factors determining the success of colonization. Here, using two experimental set-ups, we studied the effect of interspecific competition in combination with propagule pressure and preadaptation on the...

Urbanization alters plastic responses in the common dandelion

Matti Pisman, Dries Bonte & Eduardo De La Pena
Urban environments expose species to contrasting selection pressures relative to rural areas due to altered microclimatic conditions, habitat fragmentation and changes in species interactions. To improve our understanding on how urbanisation impacts selection through biotic interactions, we assessed differences in plant defence and tolerance, dispersal and flowering phenology of a common plant species (Taraxacum officinale) along an urbanization gradient and their reaction norms in response to a biotic stressor (i.e. herbivory). We raised plants from...

Liana communities exhibit different species composition, diversity and community structure across forest types in the Congo Basin

Francis Mumbanza M., Marijn Bauters, Elizabeth Kearsley, Pascal Boeckx, Constantin Lubini A. & Hans Verbeeck
Lianas are poorly characterized for central African forests. We quantify variation in liana composition, diversity and community structure in different forest types in the Yangambi Man and Biosphere Reserve, Democratic Republic of Congo. These attributes of liana assemblages were examined in 12 1-ha plots, randomly demarcated within regrowth forest, old-growth monodominant forest, old-growth mixed forest and old-growth edge forest. Using a combination of multivariate and univariate community analyses, we visualize the patterns of these liana...

Data from: Using structured eradication feasibility assessment to prioritise the management of new and emerging invasive alien species in Europe

Olaf Booy, Peter A. Robertson, Niall Moore, Jess Ward, Helen E. Roy, Tim Adriaens, Richard Shaw, Johan Van Valkenburg, Gabe Wyn, Sandro Bertolino, Olivier Blight, Etienne Branquart, Giuseppe Brundu, Joe Caffrey, Dario Capizzi, Jim Casaer, Olivier De Clerck, Neil Coughlan, Eithne Davis, Jaimie Dick, Franz Essl, Guillaume Fried, Piero Genovesi, Pablo González-Moreno, Frank Hysentruyt … & Aileen C. Mill
Prioritising the management of invasive alien species (IAS) is of global importance and within Europe integral to the EU IAS regulation. To prioritise management effectively the risks posed by IAS need to be assessed, but so too does the feasibility of their management. While risk of IAS to the EU has been assessed, the feasibility of management has not. We assessed the feasibility of eradicating 60 new (not yet established) and 35 emerging (established with...

Variation in behavioural traits of two frugivorous mammals may lead to differential responses to human disturbance

Luc Roscelin Dongmo Tédonzong, Jacob Willie, Sandra Tewamba Makengveu, Luc Lens & Nikki Tagg
Human activities can lead to a shift in wildlife species’ spatial distribution. Understanding the specific effects of human activities on ranging behaviour can improve conservation management of wildlife populations in human-dominated landscapes. This study evaluated the effects of forest use by humans on the spatial distribution of mammal species with different behavioural adaptations, using sympatric western lowland gorilla and central chimpanzee as focal species. We collected data on great ape nest locations, ecological and physical...

Habitat fragmentation shapes natal dispersal and sociality in an Afrotropical cooperative breeder

Laurence Cousseau, Martijn Hammers, Dries Van De Loock, Beate Apfelbeck, Mwangi Githiru, Erik Matthysen & Luc Lens
It remains poorly understood how effects of anthropogenic activity, such as large-scale habitat fragmentation, impact sociality in animals. In cooperatively breeding species, groups are mostly formed through delayed offspring dispersal, and habitat fragmentation can affect this process in two opposite directions. Increased habitat isolation may increase dispersal costs, promoting delayed dispersal. Alternatively, reduced patch size and quality may decrease benefits of philopatry, promoting dispersal. Here, we test both predictions in a cooperatively breeding bird (placid...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24
  • Interactive Resource
    1
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • Ghent University
    26
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    3
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Newcastle University
    2
  • KU Leuven
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • John Carroll University
    1
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    1
  • Bangor University
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1