54 Works

Data from: Using collision cones to assess biological deconfliction methods

Natalie L. Brace, Tyson L. Hedrick, Diane H. Theriault, Nathan W. Fuller, Zheng Wu, Margrit Betke, Julia K. Parrish, Daniel Grünbaum & Kristi A. Morgansen
Biological systems consistently outperform autonomous systems governed by engineered algorithms in their ability to reactively avoid collisions. To better understand this discrepancy, a collision avoidance algorithm was applied to frames of digitized video trajectory data from bats, swallows and fish (Myotis velifer, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota and Danio aequipinnatus). Information available from visual cues, specifically relative position and velocity, was provided to the algorithm which used this information to define collision cones that allowed the algorithm to...

Data from: Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment

Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Peter B. Reich, Eric M. Lind, Lauren L. Sullivan, Eric W. Seabloom, Laura Yahdjian, Andrew S. MacDougall, Lara G. Reichmann, Juan Alberti, Selene Báez, Jonathan D. Bakker, Marc W. Cadotte, Maria C. Caldeira, Enrique J. Chaneton, Carla M. D'Antonio, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Oscar Iribarne, Kevin P. Kirkman, Johannes M. H. Knops, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Ramesh Laungani, Andrew D. B. Leakey … & Elizabeth T. Borer
Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variability and climate average conditions on the success of native and non-native plant species using experimental nutrient manipulations replicated at 32 grassland sites on four continents. We hypothesized that effects of...

Data from: Genomic data reveal ancient microendemism in forest scorpions across the California Floristic Province

, Warren E. Savary, Amanda J. Zellmer, R. Bruce Bury, John E. McCormack & Robert W. Bryson
The California Floristic Province (CFP) in western North America is a globally significant biodiversity hotspot. Elucidating patterns of endemism and the historical drivers of this diversity has been an important challenge of comparative phylogeography for over two decades. We generated phylogenomic data using ddRADseq to examine genetic structure in Uroctonus forest scorpions, an ecologically restricted and dispersal-limited organism widely distributed across the CFP north to the Columbia River. We coupled our genetic data with species...

Data from: A newly identified left–right asymmetry in larval sea urchins

Jason Hodin, Keegan Lutek & Andreas Heyland
Directional asymmetry (DA) in body form is a widespread phenomenon in animals and plants alike, and a functional understanding of such asymmetries can offer insights into the ways in which ecology and development interface to drive evolution. Echinoids (sea urchins, sand dollars and their kin) with planktotrophic development have a bilaterally symmetrical feeding pluteus larva that undergoes a dramatic metamorphosis into a pentameral juvenile that enters the benthos at settlement. The earliest stage of this...

Data from: Estimating contemporary effective population size in non-model species using linkage disequilibrium across thousands of loci

Ryan K. Waples, Wesley A. Larson & Robin S. Waples
Contemporary effective population size (Ne) can be estimated using linkage disequilibrium (LD) observed across pairs of loci presumed to be selectively neutral and unlinked. This method has been commonly applied to data sets containing 10–100 loci to inform conservation and study population demography. Performance of these Ne estimates could be improved by incorporating data from thousands of loci. However, these thousands of loci exist on a limited number of chromosomes, ensuring that some fraction will...

Data from: Whole organism lineage tracing by combinatorial and cumulative genome editing

Aaron McKenna, Gregory M. Findlay, James A. Gagnon, Marshall S. Horwitz, Alexander Franz Schier & Jay Shendure
Multicellular systems develop from single cells through distinct lineages. However, current lineage-tracing approaches scale poorly to whole, complex organisms. Here, we use genome editing to progressively introduce and accumulate diverse mutations in a DNA barcode over multiple rounds of cell division. The barcode, an array of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 target sites, marks cells and enables the elucidation of lineage relationships via the patterns of mutations shared between cells. In cell culture...

Data from: Relative importance of abiotic, biotic, and disturbance drivers of plant community structure in the sagebrush steppe

Rachel M. Mitchell, Jonathan D. Bakker, John B. Vincent & G. Matt Davies
Abiotic conditions, biotic factors, and disturbances can act as filters that control community structure and composition. Understanding the relative importance of these drivers would allow us to understand and predict the causes and consequences of changes in community structure. We used long-term data (1989-2002) from the sagebrush steppe in Washington state, USA, to ask three questions: 1) What are the key drivers of community-level metrics of community structure? 2) Do community-level metrics and functional groups...

Data from: Hidden histories of gene flow in highland birds revealed with genomic markers

Eugenia Zarza, Brant C. Faircloth, Whitney L. E. Tsai, , John Klicka, John E. McCormack, Whitney L.E. Tsai & Robert W. Bryson
Genomic studies are revealing that divergence and speciation are marked by gene flow, but it is not clear whether gene flow has played a prominent role during the generation of biodiversity in species-rich regions of the world where vicariance is assumed to be the principal mode by which new species form. We revisit a well-studied organismal system in the Mexican Highlands, Aphelocoma jays, to test for gene flow among Mexican sierras. Prior results from mitochondrial...

Data from: Always chew your food: freshwater stingrays use mastication to process tough insect prey

Matthew A. Kolmann, Kenneth C. Welch, Adam P. Summers & Nathan R. Lovejoy
Chewing, characterized by shearing jaw motions and high-crowned molar teeth, is considered an evolutionary innovation that spurred dietary diversification and evolutionary radiation of mammals. Complex prey-processing behaviours have been thought to be lacking in fishes and other vertebrates, despite the fact that many of these animals feed on tough prey, like insects or even grasses. We investigated prey capture and processing in the insect-feeding freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro using high-speed videography. We find that Potamotrygon...

Data from: Intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of source-sink dynamics

Julie A. Heinrichs, Joshua L. Lawler & Nathan H. Schumaker
Many factors affect the presence and exchange of individuals among subpopulations and influence not only the emergence, but the strength of ensuing source–sink dynamics within metapopulations. Yet their relative contributions remain largely unexplored. To help identify the characteristics of empirical systems that are likely to exhibit strong versus weak source–sink dynamics and inform their differential management, we compared the relative roles of influential factors in strengthening source–sink dynamics. In a series of controlled experiments within...

Data from: Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc

Hila Levy, Gemma V. Clucas, Alex D. Rogers, Adam D. Leaché, Kate L. Ciborowski, Michael J. Polito, Heather J. Lynch, Michael J. Dunn & Tom Hart
Climate change, fisheries pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonisation and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes...

Data from: A public database of memory and naive B-cell receptor sequences

William S. DeWitt, Paul Lindau, Thomas M. Snyder, Anna M. Sherwood, Marissa Vignali, Christopher S. Carlson, Philip D. Greenberg, Natalie Duerkopp, Ryan O. Emerson & Harlan S. Robins
The vast diversity of B-cell receptors (BCR) and secreted antibodies enables the recognition of, and response to, a wide range of epitopes, but this diversity has also limited our understanding of humoral immunity. We present a public database of more than 37 million unique BCR sequences from three healthy adult donors that is many fold deeper than any existing resource, together with a set of online tools designed to facilitate the visualization and analysis of...

Data from: Indexed PCR primers induce template-specific bias in large-scale DNA sequencing studies

James L. O'Donnell, Ryan P. Kelly, Jesse A. Port, Natalie C. Lowell & James L. O’Donnell
Massively parallel sequencing is rapidly emerging as an efficient way to quantify biodiversity at all levels, from genetic variation and expression to ecological community assemblage. However, the number of reads produced per sequencing run far exceeds the number required per sample for many applications, compelling researchers to sequence multiple samples per run in order to maximize efficiency. For studies that include a PCR step, this can be accomplished using primers that include an index sequence...

Data from: Estimation of a killer whale (Orcinus orca) population’s diet using sequencing analysis of DNA from feces

Michael J. Ford, Jennifer Hempelmann, M. Bradley Hanson, Katherine L. Ayres, Robin W. Baird, Candice K. Emmons, Jessica I. Lundin, Gregory S. Schorr, Samuel K. Wasser & Linda K. Park
Estimating diet composition is important for understanding interactions between predators and prey and thus illuminating ecosystem function. The diet of many species, however, is difficult to observe directly. Genetic analysis of fecal material collected in the field is therefore a useful tool for gaining insight into wild animal diets. In this study, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing to quantitatively estimate the diet composition of an endangered population of wild killer whales (Orcinus orca) in their...

Data from: Modelling tooth–prey interactions in sharks: the importance of dynamic testing

Katherine A. Corn, Stacy C. Farina, Jeffrey Brash & Adam P. Summers
The shape of shark teeth varies among species, but traditional testing protocols have revealed no predictive relationship between shark tooth morphology and performance. We developed a dynamic testing device to quantify cutting performance of teeth. We mimicked head-shaking behaviour in feeding large sharks by attaching teeth to the blade of a reciprocating power saw fixed in a custom-built frame. We tested three tooth types at biologically relevant speeds and found differences in tooth cutting ability...

Data from: The comparative hydrodynamics of rapid rotation by predatory appendages

Mathew J. McHenry, Philip S. L. Anderson, Sam Van Wassenbergh, David Matthews, Adam Summers & S. N. Patek
Countless aquatic animals rotate appendages through the water, yet fluid forces are typically modeled with translational motion. To elucidate the hydrodynamics of rotation, we analyzed the raptorial appendages of mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) using a combination of flume experiments, mathematical modeling and phylogenetic comparative analyses. We found that computationally efficient blade-element models offered an accurate first-order approximation of drag, when compared with a more elaborate computational fluid-dynamic model. Taking advantage of this efficiency, we compared the...

Data from: Detecting the anomaly zone in species trees and evidence for a misleading signal in higher-level skink phylogeny (Squamata: Scincidae)

Charles W. Linkem, Vladimir N. Minin & Adam D. Leaché
The anomaly zone, defined by the presence of gene tree topologies that are more probable than the true species tree, presents a major challenge to the accurate resolution of many parts of the Tree of Life. This discrepancy can result from consecutive rapid speciation events in the species tree. Similar to the problem of long-branch attraction, including more data via loci concatenation will only reinforce the support for the incorrect species tree. Empirical phylogenetic studies...

Data from: A submersible, off-axis holographic microscope for detection of microbial motility and morphology in aqueous and icy environments

Christian A. Lindensmith, Stephanie Rider, Manuel Bedrossian, J. Kent Wallace, Eugene Serabyn, Gordon M. Showalter, Jody W. Deming & Jay L. Nadeau
Sea ice is an analog environment for several of astrobiology’s near-term targets: Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and perhaps other Jovian or Saturnian moons. Microorganisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, remain active within brine channels inside the ice, making it unnecessary to penetrate through to liquid water below in order to detect life. We have developed a submersible digital holographic microscope (DHM) that is capable of resolving individual bacterial cells, and demonstrated its utility for immediately imaging samples...

Data from: Are more diverse parts of the mammalian skull more labile?

Marta Linde-Medina, Julia C. Boughner, Sharlene E. Santana & Rui Diogo
Morphological variation is unevenly distributed within the mammalian skull; some of its parts have diversified more than others. It is commonly thought that this pattern of variation is mainly the result of the structural organization of the skull, as defined by the pattern and magnitude of trait covariation. Patterns of trait covariation can facilitate morphological diversification if they are aligned in the direction of selection, or these patterns can constrain diversification if oriented in a...

Data from: Precipitation alters interactions in a grassland ecological community

Nicolas Deguines, Justin S. Brashares & Laura R. Prugh
Climate change is transforming precipitation regimes world-wide. Changes in precipitation regimes are known to have powerful effects on plant productivity, but the consequences of these shifts for the dynamics of ecological communities are poorly understood. This knowledge gap hinders our ability to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. Precipitation may affect fauna through direct effects on physiology, behaviour or demography, through plant-mediated indirect effects, or by modifying interactions among species. In...

Data from: Tracing the dynamics of gene transcripts after organismal death

Alexander E. Pozhitkov, Rafik Neme, Tomislav Domazet-Lošo, Brian G. Leroux, Shivani Soni, Diethard Tautz & Peter A. Noble
In life, genetic and epigenetic networks precisely coordinate the expression of genes—but in death, it is not known if gene expression diminishes gradually or abruptly stops or if specific genes and pathways are involved. We studied this by identifying mRNA transcripts that apparently increase in relative abundance after death, assessing their functions, and comparing their abundance profiles through postmortem time in two species, mouse and zebrafish. We found mRNA transcript profiles of 1063 genes became...

Data from: A new Late Cretaceous iguanomorph from North America and the origin of New World Pleurodonta (Squamata, Iguania)

David G. DeMar, Jack L. Conrad, Jason J. Head, David J. Varricchio & Gregory P. Wilson
Iguanomorpha (stem + crown Iguania) is a diverse squamate clade with members that predominate many modern American lizard ecosystems. However, the temporal and palaeobiogeographic origins of its constituent crown clades (e.g. Pleurodonta (basilisks, iguanas, and their relatives)) are poorly constrained, mainly due to a meagre Mesozoic-age fossil record. Here, we report on two nearly complete skeletons from the Late Cretaceous (Campanian) of North America that represent a new and relatively large-bodied and possibly herbivorous iguanomorph...

Data from: High phylogenetic utility of an ultraconserved element probe set designed for Arachnida

James Starrett, Shahan Derkarabetian, Marshal Hedin, , John E. McCormack, Brant C. Faircloth & Robert W. Bryson
Arachnida is an ancient, diverse, and ecologically important animal group that contains a number of species of interest for medical, agricultural, and engineering applications. Despite their importance, many aspects of the arachnid tree of life remain unresolved, hindering comparative approaches to arachnid biology. Biologists have made considerable efforts to resolve the arachnid phylogeny; yet, limited and challenging morphological characters, as well as a dearth of genetic resources, have hindered progress. Here, we present a genomic...

Data from: Use of glacial fronts by narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in West Greenland

Kristin L. Laidre, Twila Moon, Donna D.W. Hauser, Richard McGovern, Mads Peter Heide-Joergensen, Rune Dietz, Benjamin Hudson, Donna D. W. Hauser & Ben Hudson
Glacial fronts are important summer habitat for narwhals (Monodon monoceros), however, no studies have quantified which glacial properties attract whales. We investigated the importance of glacial habitats using telemetry data from n=15 whales in September 1993-1994 and 2006-2007 in Melville Bay, West Greenland. For 41 marine-terminating glaciers, we estimated 1) narwhal presence/absence, 2) number of 24 h periods spent at glaciers, and 3) the fraction of narwhals that visited each glacier (at 5, 7, and...

Data from: Forty years of seagrass population stability and resilience in an urbanizing estuary

Andrew Olaf Shelton, Tessa B. Francis, Blake E. Feist, Gregory D. Williams, Adam Lindquist, Phillip S. Levin & Philip S. Levin
Coasts and estuaries contain among the most productive and ecologically important habitats in the world and face intense pressure from current and projected human activities, including coastal development. Seagrasses are a key habitat feature in many estuaries perceived to be in widespread decline owing to human actions. We use spatio-temporal models and a 41-year time series from 100s of km of shoreline which includes over 160 000 observations from Puget Sound, Washington, USA, to examine...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    54

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    54

Affiliations

  • University of Washington
    54
  • Stanford University
    4
  • Duke University
    3
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • Occidental College
    3
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Northwest Fisheries Science Center
    3
  • University of North Carolina
    2
  • Australian National University
    2