63 Works

Data from: Combined effects of retention forestry and prescribed burning on polypore fungi

Mai Suominen, Kaisa Junninen, Osmo Heikkala & Jari Kouki
1. Retention forestry and prescribed burning aim to alleviate the negative effects of forestry on biodiversity by maintaining the structural elements of natural forests in managed forests. We present the long-term effects of these methods on polypore fungi, a taxonomic group that has been severely affected by forestry. 2. Using a 10-year, large-scale field experiment, we studied how prescribed burning and two different tree retention levels (10 and 50 m3 ha−1) affect polypore fungi. We...

Data from: Carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from different surface types in a created urban wetland

Xuefei Li, Outi Wahlroos, Sami Haapanala, Jukka Pumpanen, Harri Vasander, Anna Ojala1, Timo Vesala & Ivan Mammarella
Many wetlands have been drained due to urbanization, agriculture, forestry or other purposes, which has resulted in losing their ecosystem services. To protect receiving waters and to achieve services such as flood control and stormwater quality mitigation, new wetlands are created in urbanized areas. However, our knowledge of greenhouse gas exchange in newly created wetlands in urban areas is currently limited. In this paper we present measurements carried out at a created urban wetland in...

The role of terrestrial productivity in regulating aquatic dissolved organic carbon concentrations in boreal catchments

Xudan Zhu, Liang Chen, Jukka Pumpanen, Anne Ojala, John Zobitz, Xuan Zhou, Hjalmar Laudon, Marjo Palviainen, Kimmo Neitola & Frank Berninger
The past decades have witnessed an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the catchments of the Northern Hemisphere. Increases in terrestrial productivity may be a reason for the increases in DOC concentration. The aim of this study is to investigate the impacts of increased terrestrial productivity and changed hydrology following climate change on DOC concentrations. We tested and quantified the effects of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE) and discharge on DOC...

The association of nine amino acids with cardiovascular events in Finnish men in a 12-year follow-up study

Raimo Jauhiainen, Jagadish Vangipurapu, Annamaria Laakso, Teemu Kuulasmaa, Johanna Kuusisto & Markku Laakso
Background and Aims: To investigate the significance of nine amino acids as risk factors for incident cardiovascular disease events in 9,584 Finnish men. Materials and Methods: A total of 9,584 men (age 57.4±7.0 years, body mass index 27.2±4.2 kg/m2) from the METSIM study without cardiovascular disease and type 1 diabetes at baseline were included in this study. A total of 662 coronary artery disease (CAD) events, 394 ischemic stroke events, and 966 cardiovascular disease (CVD,...

Data from: Assessment of dysmyelination with RAFFn MRI: application to murine MPS I

David Satzer, Christina DiBartolomeo, Michael M. Ritchie, Christine Storino, Timo Liimatainen, Hanne Hakkarainen, Djaudat Idiyatullin, Silvia Mangia, Shalom Michaeli, Ann M. Parr & Walter C. Low
Type I mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with neurological features. Humans and laboratory animals with MPS I exhibit various white matter abnormalities involving the corpus callosum and other regions. In this study, we first validated a novel MRI technique, entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field in the rotating frame of rank n (RAFFn), as a measure of myelination and dysmyelination in mice. We then examined differences between MPS I mice...

Data from: Pushing the limits of photoreception in twilight conditions: The rod-like cone retina of the deep-sea pearlsides

Fanny De Busserolles, Fabio Cortesi, Jon Vidar Helvik, Wayne I. L. Davies, Rachel M. Templin, Robert K. P. Sullivan, Craig T. Michell, Jessica K. Mountford, Shaun P. Collin, Xabier Irigoien, Stein Kaartvedt & Justin Marshall
Most vertebrates have a duplex retina comprising two photoreceptor types, rods for dim-light (scotopic) vision and cones for bright-light (photopic) and color vision. However, deep-sea fishes are only active in dim-light conditions; hence, most species have lost their cones in favor of a simplex retina composed exclusively of rods. Although the pearlsides, Maurolicus spp., have such a pure rod retina, their behavior is at odds with this simplex visual system. Contrary to other deep-sea fishes,...

Data from: Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography

Ossi Lehtikangas, Kimmo Karhunen & Marko Vauhkonen
Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields...

Data from: Size‐dependent stress response in juvenile Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) under prolonged predator conditioning

Raine Kortet, Mika V.M. Laakkonen, Jouni Tikkanen, Anssi Vainikka & Heikki Hirvonen
Predator conditioning can be used to improve post-release antipredator recognition of hatchery-reared salmonids. However, possible negative stress-related effects of prolonged predator conditioning on juvenile fish physiology are poorly understood. We studied the effects of prolonged (91 days) predator odour exposure on whole-body cortisol level and spleen size in six full-sib families of juvenile hatchery-bred Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). Chemical cues from water containing charr-fed pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) were used as the predator exposure stimuli, and...

Data from: Phylogeny of Salix subgenus Salix s.l. (Salicaceae): delimitation biogeography and reticulate evolution

Jie Wu, Tommi Nyman, Dong-Chao Wang, George W. Argus, Yong-Ping Yang & Jia-Hui Chen
Background The taxonomy and systematics of Salix subgenus Salix s.l. is difficult. The reliability and evolutionary implications of two important morphological characters (number of stamens, and morphology of bud scales) used in subgeneric classification within Salix remain untested, and a disjunct Old–New World distribution pattern of a main clade of subgenus Salix s.l., revealed by a previous study, lacks a reasonable explanation. To study these questions, we conducted phylogenetic analyses based on 4,688 bp of...

Data from: Dietary changes in predators and scavengers in a nocturnally illuminated riparian ecosystem

Alessandro Manfrin, David Lehmann, Roy H.A. Van Grunsven, Stefano Larsen, Jari Syväranta, Geraldene Wharton, Christian C. Voigt, Michael T. Monaghan, Franz Hölker & Roy H. A. Van Grunsven
Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by fluxes of carbon and nutrients in riparian areas. Processes that alter these fluxes may therefore change the diet and composition of consumer communities. We used stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses to test whether the increased abundance of aquatic prey observed in another study led to a dietary shift in riparian consumers in areas illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We measured the contribution of aquatic-derived carbon to...

Data from: Long-term species loss and homogenization of moth communities in Central Europe

Anu Valtonen, Aniko Hirka, Levente Szőcs, Matt Ayres, Heikki Roininen & György Csóka
As global biodiversity continues to decline steeply, it is becoming increasingly important to understand diversity patterns at local and regional scales. Changes in land use and climate, nitrogen deposition and invasive species are the most important threats to global biodiversity. Because land use changes tend to benefit a few species but impede many, the expected outcome is generally decreasing population sizes, decreasing species richness at local and regional scales, and increasing similarity of species compositions...

Data from: Edge influence on vegetation at natural and anthropogenic edges of boreal forests in Canada and Fennoscandia

Karen A. Harper, S. Ellen Macdonald, Michael S. Mayerhofer, Shekhar R. Biswas, Per-Anders Esseen, Kristoffer Hylander, Katherine J. Stewart, Azim U. Mallik, Pierre Drapeau, Bengt-Gunnar Jonsson, Daniel Lesieur, Jari Kouki & Yves Bergeron
1. Although anthropogenic edges are an important consequence of timber harvesting, edges due to natural disturbances or landscape heterogeneity are also common. Forest edges have been well-studied in temperate and tropical forests, but less so in less productive, disturbance-adapted boreal forests. 2. We synthesized data on forest vegetation at edges of boreal forests and compared edge influence among edge types (fire, cut, lake/wetland; old vs. young), forest types (broadleaf vs. coniferous) and geographic regions. Our...

Data from: Effects of undergrowth removal and edge proximity on ground beetles and vascular plants in urban boreal forests

Matti Koivula, Tiina Virta, Markku Kuitunen & Elisa Vallius
Urban forests are regularly managed for human safety and aesthetic reasons, but they are crucial habitat for many species. Removals of undergrowth occur commonly in these forests, yet the ecological consequences of these operations are poorly understood. We sampled ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) and vascular plants along 20-m edge gradients in Finnish urban forests, in five stands treated 0.5−2.5 years earlier with undergrowth removal and in five untreated stands. We hypothesized that undergrowth removal and...

Environmental drivers of Sphagnum growth in peatlands across the Holarctic region

Fia Bengtsson, Håkan Rydin, Jennifer Baltzer, Luca Bragazza, Zhao-Jun Bu, Simon Caporn, Ellen Dorrepaal, Kjell Ivar Flatberg, Olga Galanina, Mariusz Gałka, Anna Ganeva, Irina Goia, Nadezhda Goncharova, Michal Hajek, Akira Haraguchi, Lorna Harris, Elyn Humphreys, Martin Jiroušek, Katarzyna Kajukało, Edgar Karofeld, Natalia Koronatova, Natalia Kosykh, Anna Laine, Mariusz Lamentowicz, Elena Lapshina … & Richard J. Payne
The relative importance of global versus local environmental factors for growth and thus carbon uptake of the bryophyte genus Sphagnum – the main peat-former and ecosystem engineer in northern peatlands – remains unclear. 2) We measured length growth and net primary production (NPP) of two abundant Sphagnum species across 99 Holarctic peatlands. We tested the importance of previously proposed abiotic and biotic drivers for peatland carbon uptake (climate, N deposition, water table depth, and vascular...

Data from: Strong interactive effects of warming and insect herbivory on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics at Subarctic tree line

Nele Meyer, Tarja Silfver, Kristiina Karhu, Kristiina Myller, Outi-Maaria Sietiö, Eero Myrsky, Elina Oksanen, Matti Rousi & Juha Mikola
Warming will likely stimulate Arctic primary production, but also soil C and N mineralization, and it remains uncertain whether the Arctic will become a sink or a source for CO2. Increasing insect herbivory may also dampen the positive response of plant production and soil C input to warming. We conducted an open-air warming experiment with Subarctic field layer vegetation in North Finland to explore the effects of warming (+3°C) and reduced insect herbivory (67% reduction...

Data for Sagebrush: Consistent individual variation in plant communication: Do plants have personalities?

Richard Karban, Patrick Grof-Tisza & Charline Couchoux
Animal biologists have recently focused on individual variation in behavioral traits and have found that individuals of many species have personalities. These are defined as consistent intraspecific differences in behaviors that are repeatable across different situations and stable over time. When animals sense danger, some individuals will alert neighbors with alarm calls and both calling and responding vary consistently among individuals. Plants, including sagebrush, emit volatile cues when they are attacked by herbivores and neighbors...

Data from: Host plants of the non-swarming edible bush cricket Ruspolia differens

Robert Opoke, Philip Nyeko, Geoffrey M. Malinga, Karlmax Rutaro, Heikki Roininen & Anu Valtonen
The edible Ruspolia differens (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) is a widely-consumed insect in East Africa but surprisingly little is known of its host plant use in the field. We studied host plants used by non-swarming R. differens for 15 months, in central Uganda. In particular, we assessed the use of host plant species with respect to host cover in the field and host parts used by R. differens, also recording their sex, developmental stages, and colour morph....

Data from: Night reveals individuality in a shoaling fish

Laura Härkönen, Nico Alioravainen, Anssi Vainikka & Pekka Hyvärinen
Many animals rely heavily on visual cues from their environment, and therefore show circadian rhythmicity in their behavioral activities. In group-living animals, individuals’ activity rhythms must be synchronized not only with diel light-dark cycle but also with other group members. Increasing evidence has recently shown that circadian behaviors of animals are consistent within individuals and different between individuals, but the sources and consistency of diel activity variation in social context are less known. Using radio...

Data from: Parasite infection in a central sensory organ of fish does not affect host personality

Ines Klemme, Raine Kortet & Anssi Karvonen
Among the ecological factors acting on the evolution and expression of animal personalities and behavioral syndromes, parasitism has received comparatively little attention. However, infection and host behavior are often strongly intertwined, because host behavior can predict the risk of infection and can also be changed by an infection. We conducted a controlled experimental infection study to explore the effects of infection on host boldness, exploration and activity using rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and its trematode...

Data from: Establishing a community-wide DNA barcode library as a new tool for arctic research

H. Wirta, G. Várkonyi, C. Rasmussen, R. Kaartinen, N. M. Schmidt, P. D. N. Hebert, M. Barták, G. Blagoev, H. Disney, S. Ertl, P. Gjelstrup, D. J. Gwiazdowicz, L. Huldén, J. Ilmonen, J. Jakovlev, M. Jaschhof, J. Kahanpää, T. Kankaanpää, P. H. Krogh, R. Labbee, C. Lettner, V. Michelsen, S. A. Nielsen, T. R. Nielsen, L. Paasivirta … & T. Roslin
DNA sequences offer powerful tools for describing the members and interactions of natural communities. In this study, we establish the to-date most comprehensive library of DNA barcodes for a terrestrial site, including all known macroscopic animals and vascular plants of an intensively studied area of the High Arctic, the Zackenberg Valley in Northeast Greenland. To demonstrate its utility, we apply the library to identify nearly 20 000 arthropod individuals from two Malaise traps, each operated...

Data from: Independent and interactive effects of immune activation and larval diet on adult immune function, growth and development in the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella)

Katariina Kangassalo, Terhi M. Valtonen, Jouni Sorvari, Sanita Kecko, Mari Pölkki, Indrikis Krams, Tatjana Krama & Markus J. Rantala
Organisms in the wild are likely to face multiple immune challenges as well as additional ecological stressors, yet their interactive effects on immune function are poorly understood. Insects are found to respond to cues of increased infection risk by enhancing their immune capacity. However, such adaptive plasticity in immune function may be limited by physiological and environmental constraints. Here, we investigated the effects of two environmental stressors – poor larval diet and an artificial parasite-like...

Decreased ultraviolet radiation and decomposer biodiversity inhibit litter decomposition under continuous nitrogen inputs

Bin Wei, Dianye Zhang, Dan Kou, Guibiao Yang, Futing Liu, Yunfeng Peng & Yuanhe Yang
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has altered biogeochemical cycles and ecosystem functioning. As a key process involved in carbon and nutrient cycles in terrestrial ecosystems, litter decomposition is sensitive to external N inputs. However, it remains unclear how the interactions of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, soil biodiversity (bacteria, fungi and invertebrates) and conventional drivers (e.g., litter chemistry and microbial activities) regulate the responses of litter decomposition to continuous N inputs. Based on an N-addition experimental platform, we...

Data for: Phytochemical shift from condensed tannins to flavonoids in transgenic Betula pendula decreases consumption and growth but improves growth efficiency of Epirrita autumnata larvae

Paula Thitz, Lauri Mehtätalo, Panu Välimäki, Tendry Randriamanana, Mika Lännenpää, Ann E. Hagerman, Tommi Andersson, Riitta Julkunen-Tiitto & Tommi Nyman
Despite active research, antiherbivore activity of specific plant phenolics remains largely unresolved. We constructed silver birch (Betula pendula) lines with modified phenolic metabolism to study the effects of foliar flavonoids and condensed tannins on consumption and growth of larvae of a generalist herbivore, the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata). We conducted a feeding experiment using birch lines in which expression of dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) or anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) had been decreased by RNA...

Data from: Determinants of parasitoid communities of willow-galling sawflies: habitat overrides physiology, host plant, and space

Tommi Nyman, Sanna A. Leppänen, Gergely Várkonyi, Mark R. Shaw, Reijo Koivisto, Trond Elling Barstad, Veli Vikberg & Heikki Roininen
Studies on the determinants of plant–herbivore and herbivore–parasitoid associations provide important insights into the origin and maintenance of global and local species richness. If parasitoids are specialists on herbivore niches rather than on herbivore taxa, then alternating escape of herbivores into novel niches and delayed resource tracking by parasitoids could fuel diversification at both trophic levels. We used DNA barcoding to identify parasitoids that attack larvae of seven Pontania sawfly species that induce leaf galls...

Data from: Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe

Matti J. Koivula, Dan E. Chamberlain, Robert J. Fuller, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Attila Bankovics, Fintan Bracken, Tom Bolger, Eduardo De Juana, Marc Montadert, Renato Neves, Rui Rufino, Angel Sallent, Luís Lopes Da Silva, Pedro J. Leitão, Manfred Steffen & Allan D. Watt
Loss, fragmentation and decreasing quality of habitats have been proposed as major threats to biodiversity world-wide, but relatively little is known about biodiversity responses to multiple pressures, particularly at very large spatial scales. We evaluated the relative contributions of four landscape variables (habitat cover, diversity, fragmentation and productivity) in determining different components of avian diversity across Europe. We sampled breeding birds in multiple 1-km2 landscapes, from high forest cover to intensive agricultural land, in eight...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    9
  • 2021
    4
  • 2020
    6
  • 2019
    8
  • 2018
    5
  • 2017
    9
  • 2016
    5
  • 2015
    9
  • 2014
    7
  • 2013
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    62
  • Book
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Eastern Finland
    63
  • University of Helsinki
    17
  • University of Turku
    10
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    8
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    6
  • University of Oulu
    6
  • University of Jyväskylä
    6
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    3
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    3
  • Finnish Environment Institute
    2