6 Works

Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO), Providence Creek meteorological data, soil moisture and temperature, snow depth and air temperature

Roger Bales, Matt Meadows, Erin Stacy, Martha Conklin, Xiande Meng & SSCZO Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory
Snow depth, soil moisture and soil temperature are measured at lower Providence South facing (LowMetS) and North facing (LowMetN), Upper Providence South facing (UpMetS), North facing (UpMetN) and Flat aspect (UpMetF), and Subcatchment basin P301 (P301) with a wireless sensor network, using a Campbell Scientific logger to control peripheral devices. Snow depth is measured in the open, at the drip edge and under canopies. Soil moisture and temperature are measured at 10, 30, 60 and...

Data from: Cooperative interactions between different classes of disordered proteins play a functional role in the nuclear pore complex of Baker's yeast

David E. Ando, Ajay Gopinathan & David Ando
Nucleocytoplasmic transport is highly selective, efficient, and is regulated by a poorly understood mechanism involving hundreds of disordered FG nucleoporin proteins (FG nups) lining the inside wall of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Previous research has concluded that FG nups in Baker's yeast (S. cerevisiae) are present in a bimodal distribution, with the ``Forest Model'' classifying FG nups as either di-block polymer like ``trees'' or single-block polymer like ``shrubs''. Using a combination of coarse-grained modeling...

Data from: How chimpanzees integrate sensory information to select figs

Nathaniel J. Dominy, Justin D. Yeakel, Uttam Bhat, Lawrence Ramsden, Richard W. Wrangham & Peter W. Lucas
Figs are keystone resources that sustain chimpanzees when preferred fruits are scarce. Many figs retain a green(ish) colour throughout development, a pattern that causes chimpanzees to evaluate edibility on the basis of achromatic accessory cues. Such behaviour is conspicuous because it entails a succession of discrete sensory assessments, including the deliberate palpation of individual figs, a task that requires advanced visuomotor control. These actions are strongly suggestive of domain-specific information processing and decision-making, and they...

Data from: Controlled comparison of species- and community-level models across novel climates and communities

Kaitlin Clare Maguire, Diego Nieto-Lugilde, Jessica Blois, Matthew Fitzpatrick, John Williams, Simon Ferrier & David Lorenz
Species distribution models (SDMs) assume species exist in isolation and do not influence one another's distributions, thus potentially limiting their ability to predict biodiversity patterns. Community-level models (CLMs) capitalize on species co-occurrences to fit shared environmental responses of species and communities, and therefore may result in more robust and transferable models. Here, we conduct a controlled comparison of five paired SDMs and CLMs across changing climates, using palaeoclimatic simulations and fossil-pollen records of eastern North...

Data from: Downscaled and debiased climate simulations for North America from 21,000 years ago to 2100AD

David J. Lorenz, Diego Nieto-Lugilde, Jessica L. Blois, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick & John W. Williams
Increasingly, ecological modellers are integrating paleodata with future projections to understand climate-driven biodiversity dynamics from the past through the current century. Climate simulations from earth system models are necessary to this effort, but must be debiased and downscaled before they can be used by ecological models. Downscaling methods and observational baselines vary among researchers, which produces confounding biases among downscaled climate simulations. We present unified datasets of debiased and downscaled climate simulations for North America...

Data from: Climate structures genetic variation across a species' elevation range: a test of range limits hypotheses

Jason P. Sexton, Matthew B. Hufford, Ashley Bateman, David B. Lowry, Harald Meimberg, Sharon Y. Strauss, Kevin J. Rice & Ashley C.Bateman
Gene flow may influence the formation of species range limits, yet little is known about the patterns of gene flow with respect to environmental gradients or proximity to range limits. With rapid environmental change it is especially important to understand patterns of gene flow to inform conservation efforts. Here we investigate the species range of the selfing, annual plant, Mimulus laciniatus, in the California Sierra Nevada. We assessed genetic variation, gene flow, and population abundance...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of California, Merced
    6
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Santa Fe Institute
    1
  • National Science Foundation
    1
  • University of Oregon
    1
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    1
  • University of Hong Kong
    1
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    1
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    1
  • Harvard University
    1