2 Works

Data from: Seagrass ecosystems reduce exposure to bacterial pathogens of humans, fishes and invertebrates

Joleah B. Lamb, Jeroen A. J. M. Van De Water, David G. Bourne, Craig Altier, Margaux Y. Hein, Evan A. Fiorenza, Nur Abu, Jamaluddin Jompa & C. Drew Harvell
Plants are important in urban environments for removing pathogens and improving water quality. Seagrass meadows are the most widespread coastal ecosystem on the planet. Although these plants are known to be associated with natural biocide production, they have not been evaluated for their ability to remove microbiological contamination. Using amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we found that when seagrass meadows are present, there was a 50% reduction in the relative abundance of...

Data from: Plastic waste associated with disease on coral reefs

Joleah B. Lamb, Bette L. Willis, Evan A. Fiorenza, Courtney S. Couch, Robert Howard, Douglas N. Rader, James D. True, Lisa A. Kelly, Awaludinnoer Ahmad, Jamaluddin Jompa & C. Drew Harvell
Plastic waste can promote microbial colonization by pathogens implicated in outbreaks of disease in the ocean. We assessed the influence of plastic waste on disease risk in 124,000 reef-building corals from 159 reefs in the Asia-Pacific region. The likelihood of disease increases from 4% to 89% when corals are in contact with plastic. Structurally complex corals are eight times more likely to be affected by plastic, suggesting that microhabitats for reef-associated organisms and valuable fisheries...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    2

Affiliations

  • Hasanuddin University
    2
  • James Cook University
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Virginia–Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
    1
  • Environmental Defense Fund
    1
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    1
  • Prince of Songkla University
    1
  • Australian Research Council
    1