15 Works

Data from: Gastrodia putaoensis sp. nov. (Orchidaceae, Epidendroideae) from North Myanmar

Xiao-Hua Jin & Myint Kyaw
Gastrodia putaoensis, a new species from montane region in northern Myanmar, is described and illustrated. Gastrodia putaoensis is similar to Gastrodia dyeriana, but differs from it by lip narrowly triangular and subdivided into two parts, apical part near tip densely covered with yellow hairs, apex obtuse and densely covered with red papillae.

Data from: Both temperature fluctuations and East Asian monsoons have driven plant diversification in the karst ecosystems from southern China

Fabien L. Condamine, A.J. Harris, Junlin Chen, Bo Pan, Michael Moeller, Van Sam Hoang, Ming Kang, Hanghui Kong & AJ Harris
Karst ecosystems in southern China are species-rich and have high levels of endemism, yet little is known regarding the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin and diversification of karst biodiversity. The genus Primulina (Gesneriaceae) comprises ca. 170 species endemic to southern China with high levels of ecological (edaphic) specialization, providing an exceptional model to study the plant diversification in karsts. We used molecular data from nine chloroplast and 11 nuclear regions and macroevolutionary analyses to...

Data from: Individual-level trait variation and negative density dependence affects growth in tropical tree seedlings

Maria Natalia Umana, Elise F. Zipkin, Caicai Zhang, Min Cao, Luxiang Lin & Nathan G. Swenson
1. Individual-level interactions with neighbours and their surrounding environments are key factors influencing performance that ultimately shape and maintain diversity in tropical plant communities. Theory predicts that the strength of these interactions depends on the similarity among neighbours, the turnover in composition caused by individuals that enter as new recruits and individuals that die, and fitting to local conditions. Despite considerable phenotypic variation among individuals and high community dynamics, these three factors have rarely been...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Intra-specific relatedness, spatial clustering and reduced demographic performance in tropical rainforest trees

Xiaona Shao, Calum Brown, Samantha J. Worthy, Lu Liu, Min Cao, Qiaoming Li, Luxiang Lin & Nathan G. Swenson
Intra-specific negative density dependence promotes species coexistence by regulating population sizes. Patterns consistent with such density dependence are frequently reported in diverse tropical tree communities. Empirical evidence demonstrating whether intra-specific variation is related to these patterns, however, is lacking. The present study addresses this important knowledge gap by genotyping all individuals of a tropical tree in a long-term forest dynamics plot in tropical China. We show that related individuals are often spatially clustered, but having...

Data from: A hierarchical distance sampling model to estimate abundance and covariate associations of species and communities

Rahel Sollmann, Beth Gardner, Kathryn A. Williams, Andrew T. Gilbert & Richard R. Veit
Distance sampling is a common survey method in wildlife studies, because it allows accounting for imperfect detection. The framework has been extended to hierarchical distance sampling (HDS), which accommodates the modelling of abundance as a function of covariates, but rare and elusive species may not yield enough observations to fit such a model. We integrate HDS into a community modelling framework that accommodates multi-species spatially replicated distance sampling data. The model allows species-specific parameters, but...

Data from: A comparative analysis of common methods to identify waterbird hotspots

Allison L. Sussman, Beth Gardner, Evan M. Adams, Leo Salas, Kevin P. Kenow, David R. Luukkonen, Michael J. Monfils, William P. Mueller, Kathryn A. Williams, Michele Leduc-Lapierre & Elise F. Zipkin
1. Hotspot analysis is a commonly used method in ecology and conservation to identify areas of high biodiversity or conservation concern. However, delineating and mapping hotspots is subjective and various approaches can lead to different conclusions with regard to the classification of particular areas as hotspots, complicating long-term conservation planning. 2. We present a comparative analysis of recent approaches for identifying waterbird hotspots, with the goal of developing insights about the appropriate use of these...

Data from: Complex longitudinal diversification across South China and Vietnam in Stejneger's pit viper, Viridovipera stejnegeri (Schmidt, 1925) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae)

Peng Guo, Qin Liu, Fei Zhu, Guang H. Zhong, Xin Chen, Edward A. Myers, Jing Che, Liang Zhang, Thomas Ziegler, Truong Q. Nguyen & Frank T. Burbrink
Viridovipera stejnegeri is one of the most common pit vipers in Asia, with a wide distribution in southern China and Vietnam. We investigated historical demography and explored how the environment and climatic factors have shaped genetic diversity and the evolutionary history of this venomous snake. A total of 171 samples from 47 localities were sequenced and analysed for two mitochondrial gene fragments and three nuclear genes. Gene trees reveal the existence of two well-supported clades...

Data from: Natatanuran frogs used the Indian Plate to step-stone disperse and radiate across the Indian Ocean

Zhi-Yong Yuan, Bao-Lin Zhang, Christopher J. Raxworthy, David W. Weisrock, Paul M. Hime, Jie-Qiong Jin, Emily M. Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon, Sean D. Holland, Michelle L. Kortyna, Wei-Wei Zhou, Min-Sheng Peng, Jing Che & Elizabeth Prendini
Natatanura raw assembled sequencesNatatanura_seqs.zip

Data from: Seabird diversity hotspot linked to ocean productivity in the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem

W. James Grecian, Matthew J. Witt, Martin J. Attrill, Stuart Bearhop, Peter H. Becker, Carsten Egevang, Robert W. Furness, Brendan J. Godley, Jacob González-Solís, David Grémillet, Matthias Kopp, Amélie Lescroël, Jason Matthiopoulos, Samantha C. Patrick, Hans-Ulrich Peter, Richard A. Phillips, Iain J. Stenhouse & Stephen C. Votier
Upwelling regions are highly productive habitats targeted by wide-ranging marine predators and industrial fisheries. In this study, we track the migratory movements of eight seabird species from across the Atlantic; quantify overlap with the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) and determine the habitat characteristics that drive this association. Our results indicate the CCLME is a biodiversity hotspot for migratory seabirds; all tracked species and more than 70% of individuals used this upwelling region. Relative...

Diurnal timing of nonmigratory movement by birds: the importance of foraging spatial scales

Julie Mallon, Marlee Tucker, Annalea Beard, , Keith Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, John Brzorad, Evan Buechley, Javier Bustamante, Carlos Carrapato, José Castillo-Guerrero, Elizabeth Clingham, Mark Desholm, Christopher DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Hayley Douglas, Olivier Duriez, Peter Enggist, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Anna Gagliardo, Clara García-Ripollés, Juan Antonio Gil, Morgan Gilmour, Roi Harel … & Bill Fagan
Timing of activity can reveal an organism’s efforts to optimize foraging either by minimizing energy loss through passive movement or by maximizing energetic gain through foraging. Here, we assess whether signals of either of these strategies are detectable in the timing of activity of daily, local movements by birds. We compare the similarities of timing of movement activity among species using six temporal variables: start of activity relative to sunrise, end of activity relative to...

Data from: Speciation history of a species complex of Primulina eburnea (Gesneriaceae) from limestone karsts of south China, a biodiversity hotspot

Jing Wang, Bin Ai, Hanghui Kong & Ming Kang
Limestone karsts in southern China are characterized by high edaphic and topographic heterogeneity and host high levels of species richness and endemism. However, the evolutionary mechanisms for generating such biodiversity remain poorly understood. Here, we performed species delimitation, population genetic analyses, simulations of gene flow, and analyses of floral morphological traits to infer the geographic history of speciation in a species complex of Primulina eburnea from limestone karsts of south China. Using Bayesian species delimitation,...

Data from: Ocean currents, individual movements and genetic structuring of populations

Luis Cardona & Graeme C. Hays
Ocean currents profoundly impact all life in the oceans and over a broad size spectra species may show both horizontal and vertical movements to stay on preferred locations. As a corollary it might be expected that individuals in preferred oceanic habitats may simply drift with flows. We explored these scenarios by both satellite tracking young pelagic loggerhead turtles and examining the genetic structuring of individuals on coastal foraging areas across the Mediterranean in relation to...

Data from: A taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic perspective on the community assembly of passerine birds along an elevational gradient in southwest China

Xuelian He, Kang Luo, Calum Brown & Luxiang Lin
Integrating multiple-facets of biodiversity to describe spatial and temporal distribution patterns is one way of revealing the mechanisms driving community assembly. We assessed the species, functional and phylogenetic composition and structure of passerine bird communities along an elevational gradient both in wintering and breeding seasons in the Ailao Mountains, southwest China, in order to identify the dominant ecological processes structuring the communities and how these processes change with elevation and season. Our research confirms that...

Feather mercury increases with feeding at higher trophic levels in two species of migrant raptors, Merlin (Falco columbarius) and Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus)

Edward Keyel, Matthew Etterson, Gerald Niemi, David Evers, Christopher DeSorbo, Joel Hoffman, John Nichols, Yang Li & Frank Nicoletti
Mercury (Hg) is a toxic heavy metal that, when methylated to form methylmercury (MeHg), bioaccumulates in exposed animals and biomagnifies through food webs. The purpose of this study was to assess Hg concentrations in raptors migrating through the upper Midwestern USA. From 2009-2012, 966 raptors of 11 species were captured at Hawk Ridge, Duluth, MN. Breast feathers were sampled to determine the concentration of total Hg. Mean Hg concentrations ranged from 0.11 – 3.46 μg...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    2
  • 2019
    1
  • 2018
    5
  • 2017
    4
  • 2016
    2
  • 2015
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    15

Affiliations

  • Biodiversity Research Institute
    15
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    5
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    3
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    2
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    2
  • Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
    2
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    2
  • Philipp University of Marburg
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • Kunming Institute of Zoology
    2