6 Works

Data from: Do singles or couples live healthier lifestyles? trends in Queensland between 2005-2014

Stephanie Schoeppe, Stephanie J. Alley, Amanda R. Rebar, Melanie Hayman, Mitch J. Duncan & Corneel Vandelanotte
Objectives: To compare the frequency of and trends in healthy lifestyle factors between singles and couples. Methods: Cross-sectional data from annual surveys conducted from 2005-2014 were used. The pooled sample included 15,001 Australian adults (mean age: 52.9 years, 50% male, 74% couples) who participated in the annual Queensland Social Survey via computer-assisted telephone interviews. Relationship status was dichotomised into single and couple. Binary logistic regression was used to assess associations between relationship status, and the...

Data from: Rare long-distance dispersal of a marine angiosperm across the Pacific Ocean

Timothy M. Smith, Paul H. York, Bernardo R. Broitman, Martin Thiel, Graeme C. Hays, Erik Van Sebille, Nathan F. Putman, Peter I. Macreadie & Craig D. H. Sherman
Aim: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) events occur rarely but play a fundamental role in shaping species biogeography. Lying at the heart of island biogeography theory, LDD relies on unusual events to facilitate colonisation of new habitats and range expansion. Despite the importance of LDD, it is inherently difficult to quantify due to the rarity of such events. We estimate the probability of LDD of the seagrass Heterozostera nigricaulis, a common Australian species, across the Pacific Ocean...

Data from: Opportunistic records reveal Mediterranean reptiles’ scale‐dependent responses to anthropogenic land use

Thomas De Solan, Ian Renner, Marc Cheylan, Philippe Geniez & Jean-Yves Barnagaud
Although classified among the greatest threats to the world's biodiversity, the effects of land use and their scale dependency are left unexplored in many taxonomic groups. Reptiles are among the most data‐deficient vertebrates in this respect, although their ecological traits make them highly sensitive to habitat modifications. We tested whether land use gradients shape the distributions of Mediterranean reptiles at regional and local scales, and whether species’ ecological traits and phylogeny explain these patterns. Reptiles...

Data from: Two speed invasion: assisted and intrinsic dispersal of common mynas over 150-years of colonization

Kyle M. Ewart, Andrea S. Griffin, Rebecca N. Johnson, Salit Kark, Tali Magory Cohen, Nathan Lo & Richard E. Major
Aim: Despite the common myna’s widespread distribution, and the significant impact it has caused in parts of its non-native range, there have been no comprehensive genomic studies of its invasion of any region. We aimed to characterize the common myna invasion of the Australian continent to understand its population genetic landscape, introduction history, dispersal characteristics, and the interconnectedness between different source populations and invasive fronts. Location: Common mynas from 26 geographical locations spanning the Australian...

Data from: Computer simulations show that Neanderthal facial morphology represents adaptation to cold and high energy demands, but not heavy biting

Stephen Wroe, William C.H. Parr, Justin A. Ledogar, Jason Bourke, Samuel P. Evans, Luca Fiorenza, Stefano Benazzi, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Chris Stringer, Ottmar Kullmer, Michael Curry, Todd C. Rae, Todd R. Yokley & William C. H. Parr
Three adaptive hypotheses have been forwarded to explain the distinctive Neanderthal face: 1) an improved ability to accommodate high anterior bite forces, 2) more effective conditioning of cold and/or dry air, and, 3) adaptation to facilitate greater ventilatory demands. We test these hypotheses using three-dimensional models of Neanderthals, modern humans, and a close outgroup (H. heidelbergensis), applying finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is the most comprehensive application of either approach...

Data from: Claw morphometrics in monitor lizards: variable substrate and habitat use correlate to shape diversity within a predator guild

Domenic C. D'Amore, Simon Clulow, J. Sean Doody, David Rhind & Colin R. McHenry
Numerous studies investigate morphology in the context of habitat, and lizards have received particular attention. Substrate usage is often reflected in the morphology of characters associated with locomotion, and, as a result, claws have become well‐studied ecomorphological traits linking the two. The Kimberley predator guild of Western Australia consists of 10 sympatric varanid species. The purpose of this study was to quantify claw size and shape in the guild using geometric morphometrics, and determine whether...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Newcastle Australia
    6
  • Monash University
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Senckenberg Nature Research Society
    1
  • University of Bologna
    1
  • University at Albany, State University of New York
    1
  • Macquarie University
    1
  • Central Queensland University
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    1