4 Works

Data from: Genetic consequences of Pleistocene sea-level change on Hawaiian Megalagrion damselflies

Brandon R. Jones & Steve Jordan
The Hawaiian Islands have long been an important laboratory for evolutionary research because their geological histories offer many natural experiments. For example, the Maui Nui complex, 4 islands that have been repeatedly connected and separated by fluctuating sea levels, lie near Hawaii Island, which has never been connected to another island. Here, we examine the genetic consequences of fluctuating island areas and connectivity using microsatellite analysis of 2 widespread, endemic Hawaiian damselflies. We screened 152...

Data from: Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster)

Kelsey L. Fletcher, Brittany N. Whitley, Lisa A. Treidel, David Thompson, Annie Williams, Jose C. Noguera, Jennie R. Stevenson & Mark F. Haussmann
Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in...

Data from: Prey size and dietary niche of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii)

Luke E. Dodd, Michael J. Lacki, Joseph S. Johnson & Lynne K. Rieske
Bats in the genus Corynorhinus possess a suite of morphological characters that permit them to effectively use both gleaning and aerial-hawking foraging strategies to capture Lepidoptera. Consequently, they occupy a specialized feeding niche within North American bat assemblages and are of particular interest for dietary studies. We collected fecal pellets from a colony of C. rafinesquii (Rafinesque's Big-Eared Bat) at Mammoth Cave National Park during August–October 2011 and amplified cytochrome-c oxidase subunit 1 fragments of...

Data from: Repeated stressors in adulthood increase the rate of biological ageing

Michaela Hau, Mark F. Haussmann, Timothy J. Greives, Christa Matlack, David Costantini, Michael Quetting, James S. Adelman, Ana Catarina Miranda & Jesko Partecke
Background: Individuals of the same age can differ substantially in the degree to which they have accumulated tissue damage, akin to bodily wear and tear, from past experiences. This accumulated tissue damage reflects the individual’s biological age and may better predict physiological and behavioural performance than the individual‘s chronological age. However, at present it remains unclear how to reliably assess biological age in individual wild vertebrates. Methods: We exposed hand-raised adult Eurasian blackbirds (Turdus merula)...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Bucknell University
    4
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • Eastern Kentucky University
    1
  • University of Kentucky
    1
  • University of Konstanz
    1