3 Works

Data from: Edaphic factors, successional status, and functional traits drive habitat associations of trees in naturally regenerating tropical dry forests

Leland K. Werden, Justin M. Becknell & Jennifer S. Powers
1. Many studies have examined individual environmental drivers of tropical tree species distributions, but edaphic and successional gradients have not been considered simultaneously. Furthermore, determining how functional traits influence species distributions along these gradients may help to elucidate mechanisms behind community assembly. 2. To assess the influence of environmental filtering on tropical dry forest (TDF) tree species distributions we used forest inventory data from sites with large edaphic and successional gradients in NW Costa Rica....

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: The mismatch in distributions of vertebrates and the plants that they disperse

Jacob W. Dittel, Christopher M. Moore & Stephen B. Vander Wall
Little is known about how mutualistic interactions affect the distribution of species richness on broad geographic scales. Because mutualism positively affects the fitness of all species involved in the interaction, one hypothesis is that the richness of species involved should be positively correlated across their range, especially for obligate relationships. Alternatively, if mutualisms are facilitative (e.g., involving multiple mutualistic partners), the distribution of mutualists should not necessarily be related, and patterns in species distributions might...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Colby College
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2
  • Federal University of Southern Bahia
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • College of the Atlantic
    1
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1