9 Works

Data from: No apparent benefits of allonursing for recipient offspring and mothers in the cooperatively breeding meerkat

Kirsty J. MacLeod, Katie E. McGhee & Tim H. Clutton-Brock
1. Cooperative behaviours by definition are those that provide some benefit to another individual. Allonursing, the nursing of non-descendent young, is often considered a cooperative behaviour and is assumed to provide benefits to recipient offspring in terms of growth and survival, and to their mothers, by enabling them to share the lactation load. However, these proposed benefits are not well understood, in part because maternal and litter traits and other ecological and social variables are...

Data from: Data-driven discovery of the spatial scales of habitat choice by elephants

Andrew F. Mashintonio, Stuart L. Pimm, Grant M. Harris, Rudi J. Van Aarde & Gareth J. Russell
Setting conservation goals and management objectives relies on understanding animal habitat preferences. Models that predict preferences combine location data from tracked animals with environmental information, usually at a spatial resolution determined by the available data. This resolution may be biologically irrelevant for the species in question. Individuals likely integrate environmental characteristics over varying distances when evaluating their surroundings; we call this the scale of selection. Even a single characteristic might be viewed differently at different...

Data from: Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly

Pim Van Hooft, Ben J. Greyling, Wayne M. Getz, Paul D. Van Helden, Bas J. Zwaan & Armanda D. S. Bastos
Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite...

Data from: Population structure and diversity of an invasive pine needle pathogen reflects anthropogenic activity

Irene Barnes, Michael J. Wingfield, Ignazio Carbone, Thomas Kirisits & Brenda D. Wingfield
Dothistroma septosporum is a haploid fungal pathogen that causes a serious needle blight disease of pines, particularly as an invasive alien species on Pinus radiata in the Southern Hemisphere. During the course of the last two decades, the pathogen has also incited unexpected epidemics on native and non-native pine hosts in the Northern Hemisphere. Although the biology and ecology of the pathogen has been well documented, there is a distinct lack of knowledge regarding its...

Data from: Disease, predation and demography: assessing the impacts of bovine tuberculosis on African buffalo by monitoring at individual and population levels

P. C. Cross, D. M. Heisey, J. A. Bowers, C. T. Hay, J. Wolhuter, P. Buss, M. Hofmeyr, A. L. Michel, R. G. Bengis, T. L. F. Bird, J. T. Du Toit & W. M. Getz
1. Understanding the effects of disease is critical to determining appropriate management responses, but estimating those effects in wildlife species is challenging. We used bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the African buffalo Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, South Africa, as a case study to highlight the issues associated with estimating chronic disease effects in a long-lived host. 2. We used known and radiocollared buffalo, aerial census data, and a natural gradient in pathogen prevalence...

Data from: Stacking the odds: light pollution may shift the balance in an ancient predator-prey arms race

Corneile Minnaar, Justin G. Boyles, Ingrid A. Minnaar, Catherine L. Sole & Andrew E. McKechnie
1. Artificial night-lighting threatens to disrupt strongly conserved light-dependent processes in animals and may have cascading effects on ecosystems as species interactions become altered. Insectivorous bats and their prey have been involved in a nocturnal, coevolutionary arms race for millions of years. Lights may interfere with anti-bat defensive behaviours in moths, and disrupt a complex and globally ubiquitous interaction between bats and insects, ultimately leading to detrimental consequences for ecosystems on a global scale. 2....

Data from: Population genomics of the killer whale indicates ecotype evolution in sympatry involving both selection and drift

Andre E. Moura, John G. Kenny, Roy Chaudhuri, Margaret A. Hughes, Andreanna Welch, Ryan R. Reisinger, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Marilyn E. Dahlheim, Neil Hall, A. Rus Hoelzel & Andreanna J. Welch
The evolution of diversity in the marine ecosystem is poorly understood, given the relatively high potential for connectivity, especially for highly mobile species such as whales and dolphins. The killer whale (Orcinus orca) has a worldwide distribution, and individual social groups travel over a wide geographic range. Even so, regional populations have been shown to be genetically differentiated, including among different foraging specialists (ecotypes) in sympatry. Given the strong matrifocal social structure of this species...

Data from: Genetic structure of fragmented southern populations of African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)

Nathalie Smitz, Daniel Cornélis, Philippe Chardonnet, Alexandre Caron, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky, Ferran Jori, Alice Mouton, Alice Latinne, Lice-Marie Pigneur, Mario Melletti, Kimberly L. Kanapeckas, Jonathan Marescaux, Carlos Lopes Pereira & Johan Michaux
Background: African wildlife experienced a reduction in population size and geographical distribution over the last millennium, particularly since the 19th century as a result of human demographic expansion, wildlife overexploitation, habitat degradation and cattle-borne diseases. In many areas, ungulate populations are now largely confined within a network of loosely connected protected areas. These metapopulations face gene flow restriction and run the risk of genetic diversity erosion. In this context, we assessed the “genetic health” of...

Data from: Comparative genomics of type VI secretion systems in strains of Pantoea ananatis from different environments

Divine Yufetar Shyntum, Stephanus Nicolaas Venter, Lucy Novungayo Moleleki, Ian K. Toth & Teresa Ann Coutinho
Background: The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) has been identified in several different bacteria, including the plant pathogen Pantoea ananatis. Previous in silico analyses described three different T6SS loci present in the pathogenic strain of P. ananatis LMG 20103. This initial investigation has been extended to include an additional seven sequenced strains of P. ananatis together with 39 strains from different ecological niches. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses were used to investigate the distribution, evolution, intra-strain...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Pretoria
    9
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • Durham University
    1
  • Wildlife Conservation Society
    1
  • Agricultural Research Council
    1
  • National Marine Fisheries Service
    1
  • United States Geological Survey
    1