14 Works

Data from: Population dynamics of owned, free-roaming dogs: implications for rabies control

Anne Conan, Oluyemisi Akerele, Greg Simpson, Bjorn Reininghaus, Jacques Van Rooyen & Darryn Knobel
Background: Rabies is a serious yet neglected public health threat in resource-limited communities in Africa, where the virus is maintained in populations of owned, free-roaming domestic dogs. Rabies elimination can be achieved through the mass vaccination of dogs, but maintaining the critical threshold of vaccination coverage for herd immunity in these populations is hampered by their rapid turnover. Knowledge of the population dynamics of free-roaming dog populations can inform effective planning and implementation of mass...

Data from: Cyanobacteria drive community composition and functionality in rock-soil interface communities

Angel Valverde, Thulani P. Makhalanyane, Mary Seely & Don A. Cowan
Most ecological research on hypoliths, significant primary producers in hyperarid deserts, has focused on the diversity of individual groups of microbes (i.e. bacteria). However, microbial communities are inherently complex, and the interactions between cyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, protista and metazoa, are likely to be very important for ecosystem functioning. Cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial communities were analysed by pyrosequencing, while metazoan and protistan communities were assessed by T-RFLP analysis. Microbial functionality was estimated using carbon substrate utilization....

Data from: Patterns of trophic niche divergence between invasive and native fishes in wild communities are predictable from mesocosm studies

Thi Nhat Quyen Tran, Michelle C. Jackson, Danny Sheath, Hugo Verreycken & J. Robert Britton
1. Ecological theory attempts to predict how impacts for native species arise from biological invasions. A fundamental question centres on the feeding interactions of invasive and native species: whether invasion will result in increased interspecific competition, which would result in negative consequences for the competing species, or trophic niche divergence, which would facilitate the invader's integration into the community and their coexistence with native species. 2. Here, the feeding interactions of a highly invasive fish,...

Data from: Using the Spatial Population Abundance Dynamics Engine for conservation management

Nicholas J. Beeton, Clive R. McMahon, Grant Williamson, Joanne Potts, Jonathan Bloomer, Marthán N. Bester, Lawrence K. Forbes, Christopher N. Johnson, Grant J. Williamson, Chris N. Johnson & Larry K. Forbes
1. An explicit spatial understanding of population dynamics is often critical for effective management of wild populations. Sophisticated approaches are available to simulate these dynamics, but are largely either spatially homogeneous or agent-based, and thus best suited to small spatial or temporal scales. These approaches also often ignore financial decisions crucial to choosing management approaches on the basis of cost-effectiveness. 2. We created a user-friendly and flexible modelling framework for simulating these population issues at...

Data from: Serendipitous meta-transcriptomics: the fungal community of Norway spruce (Picea abies)

Nicolas Delhomme, Görel Sundström, Neda Zamani, Henrik Lantz, Yao-Cheng Lin, Torgeir R. Hvidsten, Marc P. Höppner, Patric Jern, Yves Van De Peer, Joakim Lundeberg, Manfred G. Grabherr & Nathaniel R. Street
After performing de novo transcript assembly of >1 billion RNA-Sequencing reads obtained from 22 samples of different Norway spruce (Picea abies) tissues that were not surface sterilized, we found that assembled sequences captured a mix of plant, lichen, and fungal transcripts. The latter were likely expressed by endophytic and epiphytic symbionts, indicating that these organisms were present, alive, and metabolically active. Here, we show that these serendipitously sequenced transcripts need not be considered merely as...

Data from: Solar radiation during rewarming from torpor in elephant shrews: supplementation or substitution of endogenous heat production?

Michelle L. Thompson, Nomakwezi Mzilikazi, Nigel C. Bennett & Andrew E. McKechnie
Many small mammals bask in the sun during rewarming from heterothermy, but the implications of this behaviour for their energy balance remain little understood. Specifically, it remains unclear whether solar radiation supplements endogenous metabolic thermogenesis (i.e., rewarming occurs through the additive effects of internally-produced and external heat), or whether solar radiation reduces the energy required to rewarm by substituting (i.e, replacing) metabolic heat production. To address this question, we examined patterns of torpor and rewarming...

Data from: Multiple introductions from multiple sources: invasion patterns for an important eucalyptus leaf pathogen

Matsepo Taole, Wubetu Bihon, Michael J. Wingfield, Brenda D. Wingfield & Treena I. Burgess
Many population studies on invasive plant pathogens are undertaken without knowing the center of origin of the pathogen. Most leaf pathogens of Eucalyptus originate in Australia and consequently with indigenous populations available, and it is possible to study the pathways of invasion. Teratosphaeria suttonii is a commonly occurring leaf pathogen of Eucalyptus species, naturally distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of eastern Australia where it is regarded as a minor pathogen infecting older leaves; however,...

Data from: Termite mounds differ in their importance for herbivores across savanna types, seasons and spatial scales

Andrew B. Davies, Shaun R. Levick, Mark P. Robertson, Berndt J. Van Rensburg, Gregory P. Asner & Catherine L. Parr
Herbivores do not forage uniformly across landscapes, but select for patches of higher nutrition and lower predation risk. Macrotermes mounds contain higher concentrations of soil nutrients and support grasses of higher nutritional value than the surrounding savanna matrix, attracting mammalian grazers that preferentially forage on termite mound vegetation. However, little is known about the spatial extent of such termite influence on grazing patterns and how it might differ in time and space. We measured grazing...

Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness

Lauchlan H. Fraser, Jason Pither, Anke Jentsch, Marcelo Sternberg, Martin Zobel, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Jonathan A. Bennett, Alex Bittel, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Ilsi I. Boldrini, Edward Bork, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, James Cahill, Cameron N. Carlyle, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Anna-Maria Csergo, Sandra Diaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Alessandra Fidelis … & Szilárd Szentes
The search for predictions of species diversity across environmental gradients has challenged ecologists for decades. The humped-back model (HBM) suggests that plant diversity peaks at intermediate productivity; at low productivity few species can tolerate the environmental stresses, and at high productivity a few highly competitive species dominate. Over time the HBM has become increasingly controversial, and recent studies claim to have refuted it. Here, by using data from coordinated surveys conducted throughout grasslands worldwide and...

Data from: Three hundred years of low non-paternity in a human population

Jaco M. Greeff & J. Christoff Erasmus
When cuckoldry is frequent we can expect fathers to withhold investment in offspring that may not be theirs. Human paternal investment can be substantial and is in line with observations from tens of thousands of conceptions that suggest that cuckoldry is rare in humans. The generality of this claim seems to be in question as the rate of cuckoldry varies across populations and studies have mostly been on Western populations. Two additional factors complicate our...

Data from: Hatching late in the season requires flexibility in the timing of song learning

Stefan Leitner, Johanna Teichel, Andries Ter Maat & Cornelia Voigt
Most songbirds learn their songs from adult tutors, who can be their father or other male conspecifics. However, the variables that control song learning in a natural social context are largely unknown. We investigated whether the time of hatching of male domesticated canaries has an impact on their song development and on the neuroendocrine parameters of the song control system. Average age difference between early- and late-hatched males was 50 days with a maximum of...

Data from: Sex-specific and individual preferences for hunting strategies in white sharks

Alison V. Towner, Vianey Leos-Barajas, Roland Langrock, Robert S. Schick, Malcolm J. Smale, Tami Kaschke, Oliver J.D. Jewell, Yannis P. Papastamatiou & Oliver J. D. Jewell
Fine-scale predator movements may be driven by many factors including sex, habitat, and distribution of resources. There may also be individual preferences for certain movement strategies within a population which can be hard to quantify. Within top predators, movements are also going to be directly related to the mode of hunting; for example sit-and-wait or actively searching for prey. Although there is mounting evidence that different hunting modes can cause opposing trophic cascades, there has...

Data from: Polyceraty (multi-horns) in Damara sheep maps to ovine chromosome 2

Ockert F. C. Greyvenstein, Coralie M. Reich, Este Van Marle-Koster, David G. Riley & Ben J. Hayes
Polyceraty (presence of multiple horns) is rare in modern day ungulates. Although not found in wild sheep, polyceraty does occur in a small number of domestic sheep breeds covering a wide geographical region. Damara are fat-tailed hair sheep, from the south-western region of Africa, which display polyceraty, with horn number ranging from zero to four. We conducted a genome-wide association study for horn number with 43 Damara genotyped with 606 006 SNP markers. The analysis...

Data from: Fenced and fragmented: conservation value of managed metapopulations

Susan M. Miller, Paulette Bloomer, Cindy K. Harper, Jennifer Hofmeyr & Paul J. Funston
Population fragmentation is threatening biodiversity worldwide. Species that once roamed vast areas are increasingly being conserved in small, isolated areas. Modern management approaches must adapt to ensure the continued survival and conservation value of these populations. In South Africa, a managed metapopulation approach has been adopted for several large carnivore species, all protected in isolated, relatively small, reserves that are fenced. As far as possible these approaches are based on natural metapopulation structures. In this...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Pretoria
    14
  • University of Camerino
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Department of Agriculture
    1
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Islamic Azad University
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine
    1
  • Ferdowsi University of Mashhad
    1