9 Works

Data from: Behavioral evidence for fruit odor discrimination and sympatric host races of Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the western United States

Charles E. Linn, Wee L. Yee, Sheina B. Sim, Dong H. Cha, Thomas Powell, Robert B. Goughnour & Jeffrey L. Feder
The recent shift of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) from its native host downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis, to introduced domesticated apple, Malus domestica, in the eastern U.S. is a model for sympatric host race formation. However, the fly is also present in the western U.S., where it may have been introduced via infested apples within the last 60 years. In addition to apple, R. pomonella also infests two hawthorns in the West, one the native black...

Decreased coevolutionary potential and increased symbiont fecundity during the biological invasion of a legume-rhizobium mutualism

Camille Wendlandt, Emily Helliwell, Miles Roberts, Kyle Nguyen, Maren Friesen, Eric Von Wettberg, Paul Price, Joel Griffitts & Stephanie Porter
Although most invasive species engage in mutualism, we know little about how mutualism evolves as partners colonize novel environments. Selection on cooperation and standing genetic variation for mutualism traits may differ between a mutualism's invaded and native ranges, which could alter cooperation and coevolutionary dynamics. To test for such differences, we compare mutualism traits between invaded- and native-range host-symbiont genotype combinations of the weedy legume, Medicago polymorpha, and its nitrogen-fixing rhizobium symbiont, Ensifer medicae, which...

Data from: A field test for host fruit odour discrimination and avoidance behaviour for Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the western United States

Sheina B. Sim, Monte Mattsson, Jasmine L. Feder, Dong H. Cha, Wee L. Yee, Robert B. Goughnour, Charles E. Linn & Jeffrey L. Feder
Prezygotic isolation due to habitat choice is important to many models of speciation-with-gene-flow. Habitat choice is usually thought to occur through positive preferences of organisms for particular environments. However, avoidance of non-natal environments may also play a role in choice and have repercussions for postzygotic isolation that preference does not. The recent host shift of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) from downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis, to introduced apple, Malus domestica, in the eastern U.S. is a...

Data from: Consumer responses to experimental pulsed subsidies in isolated vs. connected habitats

Amber Wright, Jonah Piovia-Scott, Louie H. Yang, David A. Spiller & Thomas W. Schoener
Increases in consumer abundance following a resource pulse can be driven by diet shifts, aggregation, and reproductive responses, with combined responses expected to result in faster response times and larger numerical increases. Previous work in plots on large Bahamian islands has shown that lizards (Anolis sagrei) increased in abundance following pulses of seaweed deposition, which provide additional prey (i.e., seaweed detritivores). Numerical responses were associated with rapid diet shifts and aggregation, followed by increased reproduction....

Data from: Modelling the functional link between movement, feeding activity and condition in a marine predator

Enrico Pirotta, Lisa K. Schwarz, Daniel P. Costa, Patrick W. Robinson & Leslie New
The ability to quantify animals’ feeding activity and the resulting changes in their body condition as they move in the environment is fundamental to our understanding of a population’s ecology. We use satellite tracking data from northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), paired with simultaneous diving information, to develop a Bayesian state-space model that concurrently estimates an individual’s location, feeding activity, and changes in condition. The model identifies important foraging areas and times, the relative amount...

Host plant adaptation during recent global range expansion in the monarch butterfly

Micah Freedman, Christopher Jason, Santiago Ramirez & Sharon Strauss
Herbivores that have recently expanded their host plant ranges provide opportunities to test hypotheses about the evolution of host plant specialization. Here, we take advantage of the contemporary global range expansion of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and conduct a reciprocal rearing experiment involving monarch populations with divergent host plant assemblages. Specifically, we ask the following questions: (1) Do geographically disparate populations of monarch butterflies show evidence for local adaptation to their host plants? If...

Data from: Dynamic genomic architecture of mutualistic cooperation in a wild population of Mesorhizobium

Stephanie S. Porter, Joshua Faber-Hammond, Angeliqua P. Montoya, Maren L. Friesen & Cynthia Sackos
Research on mutualism seeks to explain how co-operation can be maintained when uncooperative mutants co-occur with cooperative kin. Gains and losses of the gene modules required for co-operation punctuate symbiont phylogenies and drive lifestyle transitions between cooperative symbionts and uncooperative free-living lineages over evolutionary time. Yet whether uncooperative symbionts commonly evolve from within cooperative symbiont populations or from within distantly related lineages with antagonistic or free-living lifestyles (i.e., third-party mutualism exploiters or parasites), remains controversial....

Data from: Rapid establishment of a flowering cline in Medicago polymorpha after invasion of North America

Emily Helliwell, Joshua Faber-Hammond, Zoie Lopez, Aaron Garouette, Eric Von Wettberg, Maren Friesen & Stephanie Porter
To establish and spread in a new location, an invasive species must be able to carry out its life cycle in novel environmental conditions. A key trait underlying fitness is the shift from vegetative to reproductive growth through floral development. In this study, we used a common garden experiment and genotyping-by-sequencing to test whether the latitudinal flowering cline of the North American invasive plant Medicago polymorpha was translocated from its European native range through multiple...

Negotiating mutualism: a locus for exploitation by rhizobia has a broad effect size distribution and context-dependent effects on legume hosts

Camille Wendlandt, Miles Roberts, Kyle Nguyen, Marion Graham, Zoie Lopez, Emily Helliwell, Maren Friesen, Joel Griffitts, Paul Price & Stephanie Porter
In mutualisms, variation at genes determining partner fitness provides the raw material upon which coevolutionary selection acts, setting the dynamics and pace of coevolution. However, we know little about variation in the effects of genes that underlie symbiotic fitness in natural mutualist populations. In some species of legumes that form root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria, hosts secrete nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that cause rhizobia to differentiate in the nodule environment. However, rhizobia can...

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Affiliations

  • Washington State University Vancouver
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  • University of California, Davis
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  • Department of Plant Biology
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