503 Works

Data from: Mutation rate dynamics in a bacterial population reflect tension between adaptation and genetic load

Sébastien Wielgoss, Jeffrey E. Barrick, Olivier Tenaillon, Michael J. Wiser, W. James Dittmar, Stéphane Cruveiller, Béatrice Chane-Woon-Ming, Claudine Médigue, Richard E. Lenski & Dominique Schneider
Mutations are the ultimate source of heritable variation for evolution. Understanding how mutation rates themselves evolve is thus essential for quantitatively understanding many evolutionary processes. According to theory, mutation rates should be minimized for well-adapted populations living in stable environments, whereas hypermutators may evolve if conditions change. However, the long-term fate of hypermutators is unknown. Using a phylogenomic approach, we found that an adapting Escherichia coli population that first evolved a mutT hypermutator phenotype was...

Data from: Coevolutionary patterns and diversification of ant-fungus associations in the asexual fungus-farming ant Mycocepurus smithii in Panama

Katrin Kellner, Hermogenes Fernández-Marín, Heather D. Ishak, Ruchira Sen, Timothy A. Linksvayer & Ulrich G. Mueller
Partner fidelity through vertical symbiont transmission is thought to be the primary mechanism stabilizing cooperation in the mutualism between fungus-farming (attine) ants and their cultivated fungal symbionts. An alternate or additional mechanism could be adaptive partner or symbiont choice mediating horizontal cultivar transmission or de novo domestication of free-living fungi. Using microsatellite-genotyping for the attine ant Mycocepurus smithii and ITS rDNA-sequencing for fungal cultivars, we provide the first detailed population-genetic analysis of local ant-fungus associations...

Data from: Gene expression under chronic heat stress in populations of the mustard hill coral (Porites astreoides) from different thermal environments

Carly D. Kenkel, Eli Meyer & Mikhail V. Matz
Recent evidence suggests that corals can acclimatize or adapt to local stress factors through differential regulation of their gene expression. Profiling gene expression in corals from diverse environments can elucidate the physiological processes that may be responsible for maximizing coral fitness in their natural habitat and lead to a better understanding of the coral's capacity to survive the effects of global climate change. In an accompanying paper, we show that Porites astreoides from thermally different...

Data from: Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIb polymorphism influences gut microbiota composition and diversity

Daniel Bolnick, Lisa Snowberg, William Stutz, Greg Caporaso, Christian Lauber, Rob Knight, Daniel I. Bolnick, Chris Lauber, J. Gregory Caporaso, William E. Stutz & Lisa K. Snowberg
Individuals harbor diverse communities of symbiotic bacteria, which differ dramatically among host individuals. This heterogeneity poses an immunological challenge of distinguishing between mutualistic and pathogenic members of diverse and host-specific microbial communities. We propose that Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC) genotypes contribute to recognition and regulation of gut microbes, and thus MHC polymorphism contributes to microbial variation among hosts. Here, we confirm that, within a single wild vertebrate population of threespine stickleback, different MHC II...

Data from: The genetic architecture of constitutive and induced trichome density in two new RIL populations of Arabidopsis thaliana: phenotypic plasticity, epistasis, and bidirectional leaf damage response

Rebecca H. Bloomer, Alan M. Lloyd & V. Vaughan Symonds
Background: Herbivory imposes an important selective pressure on plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana leaf trichomes provide a key defense against insect herbivory; however, trichome production incurs a fitness cost in the absence of herbivory. Previous work on A. thaliana has shown an increase in trichome density in response to leaf damage, suggesting a mechanism by which the cost associated with constitutively high trichome density might be mitigated; however, the genetic basis of trichome density induction has...

Data from: Massive, solidified bone in the wing of a volant courting bird

Kimberly S. Bostwick, Mark L. Riccio & Julian M. Humphries
One pervasive morphological feature of tetrapods is the pipe-like, often marrow-filled, structure of the limb or long bones. This “hollow” form maximizes flexural strength and stiffness with the minimum amount of bony material, and is exemplified by truly hollow (air-filled), or pneumatic, humeri in many modern birds. High-resolution microCT scans of the wings of two male Club-winged Manakins (Machaeropterus deliciosus) uncovered a notable exception to the hollow-tube rule in terrestrial vertebrates; males exhibited solidified ulnae...

Data from: Frequent and seasonally variable sublethal anthrax infections are accompanied by short-lived immunity in an endemic system

Carrie A. Cizauskas, Steven E. Bellan, Wendy C. Turner, Russell E. Vance & Wayne M. Getz
1. Few studies have examined host-pathogen interactions in wildlife from an immunological perspective, particularly in the context of seasonal and longitudinal dynamics. In addition, though most ecological immunology studies employ serological antibody assays, endpoint titer determination is usually based on subjective criteria and needs to be made more objective. 2. Despite the fact that anthrax is an ancient and emerging zoonotic infectious disease found worldwide, its natural ecology is not well understood. In particular, little...

Data from: Evolutionary renovation of L/M opsin polymorphism confers a fruit discrimination advantage to ateline New World monkeys

Yoshifumi Matsumoto, Chihiro Hiramatsu, Yuka Matsushita, Norihiro Ozawa, Ryuichi Ashino, Makiko Nakata, Satoshi Kasagi, Anthony Di Fiore, Colleen Schaffner, Filippo Aureli, Amanda D. Melin, Shoji Kawamura & Colleen M. Schaffner
New World monkeys exhibit prominent color vision variation due to allelic polymorphism of the long-to-middle wavelength (L/M) opsin gene. The known spectral variation of L/M opsins in primates is broadly determined by amino acid composition at three sites: 180, 277 and 285 (the “three-sites” rule). However, two L/M opsin alleles found in the black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) are known exceptions, presumably due to novel mutations. The spectral separation of the two L/M photopigments is...

Data from: Quantifying historical trends in the completeness of the fossil record and the contributing factors: an example using Aves

Daniel T. Ksepka & Clint A. Boyd
Improvements in the perceived completeness of the fossil record may be driven both by new discoveries and by reinterpretation of known fossils, but disentangling the relative effects of these processes can be difficult. Here, we propose a new methodology for evaluating historical trends in the perceived completeness of the fossil record, demonstrate its implementation using the freely available software ASCC (version 4.0.0), and present an example using crown-group birds (Aves). Dates of discovery and recognition...

Data from: Gene expression associated with white syndromes in a reef building coral, Acropora hyacinthus

Rachel M. Wright, Galina V. Aglyamova, Eli Meyer & Mikhail V. Matz
Background: Corals are capable of launching diverse immune defenses at the site of direct contact with pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms of this activity and the colony-wide effects of such stressors remain poorly understood. Here we compared gene expression profiles in eight healthy Acropora hyacinthus colonies against eight colonies exhibiting tissue loss commonly associated with white syndromes, all collected from a natural reef environment near Palau. Two types of tissues were sampled from diseased corals:...

Data from: Bacterial cooperation causes systematic errors in pathogen risk assessment due to the failure of the independent action hypothesis

Daniel M. Cornforth, Andrew Matthews, Sam P. Brown & Ben Raymond
The Independent Action Hypothesis (IAH) states that pathogenic individuals (cells, spores, virus particles etc.) behave independently of each other, so that each has an independent probability of causing systemic infection or death. The IAH is not just of basic scientific interest; it forms the basis of our current estimates of infectious disease risk in humans. Despite the important role of the IAH in managing disease interventions for food and water-borne pathogens, experimental support for the...

Data from: Emergence timing and fitness consequences of variation in seed oil composition in Arabidopsis thaliana

Sandra E. Pelc & C. Randal Linder
Early seedling emergence can increase plant fitness under competition. Seed oil composition (the types and relative amounts of fatty acids in the oils) may play an important role in determining emergence timing and early growth rate in oilseeds. Saturated fatty acids provide more energy per carbon atom than unsaturated fatty acids but have substantially higher melting points (when chain length is held constant). This characteristic forms the basis of an adaptive hypothesis that lower melting...

Data from: Multilocus phylogeny and a new classification for Southeast Asian and Melanesian forest frogs (family Ceratobatrachidae)

Rafe M. Brown, Cameron D. Siler, Stephen J. Richards, Arvin C. Diesmos & David C. Cannatella
We present a near comprehensive, densely sampled, multilocus phylogenetic estimate of species relationships within the anuran family Ceratobatrachidae, a morphologically and ecologically diverse group of frogs from the island archipelagos of Southeast Asia and the South-West Pacific. Ceratobatrachid frogs consist of three clades: a small clade of enigmatic, primarily high-elevation, semi-aquatic Sundaland species currently assigned to Ingerana (for which we erect a new genus), which is the sister taxon of two large, monophyletic radiations, each...

Data from: Does plasticity enhance or dampen phenotypic parallelism? A test with three lake-stream stickleback pairs.

Krista B. Oke, Mehvish Bukhari, Renaud Kaeuffer, Gregor Rolshausen, Katja Räsänen, Daniel I. Bolnick, Catherine L. Peichel & Andrew P. Hendry
Parallel (and convergent) phenotypic variation is most often studied in the wild, where it is difficult to disentangle genetic versus environmentally-induced effects. As a result, the potential contributions of phenotypic plasticity to parallelism (and non-parallelism) are rarely evaluated in a formal sense. Phenotypic parallelism could be enhanced by plasticity that causes stronger parallelism across populations in the wild than would be expected from genetic differences alone. Phenotypic parallelism could be dampened if site-specific plasticity induced...

Data from: A shift from exploitation to interference competition with increasing density affects population and community dynamics

Erica M. Holdridge, Catalina Cuellar-Gempeler & Casey P. TerHorst
Intraspecific competition influences population and community dynamics and occurs via two mechanisms. Exploitative competition is an indirect effect that occurs through use of a shared resource and depends on resource availability. Interference competition occurs by obstructing access to a resource and may not depend on resource availability. Our study tested whether the strength of interference competition changes with protozoa population density. We grew experimental microcosms of protozoa and bacteria under different combinations of protozoan density...

Data from: Sexual fidelity trade-offs promote regulatory variation in the prairie vole brain

Mariam Okhovat, Alejandro Berrio, Gerard Wallace, Alexander G. Ophir & Steven M. Phelps
Individual variation in social behavior seems ubiquitous, but we know little about how it relates to brain diversity. Among monogamous prairie voles, levels of vasopressin receptor (encoded by the gene avpr1a) in brain regions related to spatial memory predict male space use and sexual fidelity in the field. We find that trade-offs between the benefits of male fidelity and infidelity are reflected in patterns of territorial intrusion, offspring paternity, avpr1a expression, and the evolutionary fitness...

Data from: Evolutionary shifts in the melanin-based color system of birds

Chad M. Eliason, Matthew D. Shawkey, Julia A. Clark & Julia A. Clarke
Melanin pigments contained in organelles (melanosomes) impart earthy colors to feathers. Such melanin-based colors are distributed across birds and thought to be the ancestral color-producing mechanism in birds. However, we have had limited data on melanin-based color and melanosome diversity in Palaeognathae, which includes the flighted tinamous and large-bodied, flightless ratites and is the sister taxon to all other extant birds. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry to assess melanosome morphology and quantify...

Data from: Cline coupling and uncoupling in a stickleback hybrid zone

Timothy H. Vines, Anne C. Dalziel, Arianne Albert, Thor Veen, Patricia Marita Schulte, Dolph Schluter & Arianne Y. K. Albert
Strong ecological selection on a genetic locus can maintain allele frequency differences between populations in different environments, even in the face of hybridization. When alleles at divergent loci come into tight linkage disequilibrium, selection acts on them as a unit and can significantly reduce gene flow. For populations interbreeding across a hybrid zone, linkage disequilibria between loci can force clines to share the same slopes and centers. However, strong ecological selection on a locus can...

Data from: Controlled measurement and comparative analysis of cellular components in E. coli reveals broad regulatory changes in response to glucose starvation

John R. Houser, Craig Barnhart, Daniel R. Boutz, Sean M. Carrol, Aurko Dasgupta, Joshua K. Michener, Brittany D. Needham, Ophelia Papoulas, Viswanadham Sridhara, Dariya K. Sydykova, Christopher J. Marx, M. Stephen Trent, Jeffery E. Barrick, Edward M. Marcotte, Claus O. Wilke, Jeffrey E. Barrick & Sean M. Carroll
How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not...

Data from: Asgard archaea illuminate the origin of eukaryotic cellular complexity

Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Eva F. Caceres, Jimmy H. Saw, Disa Bäckström, Lina Juzokaite, Emmelien Vancaester, Kiley W. Seitz, Karthik Anantharaman, Piotr Starnawski, Kasper U. Kjeldsen, Matthew B. Stott, Takuro Nunoura, Jillian F. Banfield, Andreas Schramm, Brett J. Baker, Anja Spang & Thijs J. G. Ettema
The origin and cellular complexity of eukaryotes represent a major enigma in biology. Current data support scenarios in which an archaeal host cell and an alphaproteobacterial (mitochondrial) endosymbiont merged together, resulting in the first eukaryotic cell. The host cell is related to Lokiarchaeota, an archaeal phylum with many eukaryotic features. The emergence of the structural complexity that characterizes eukaryotic cells remains unclear. Here we describe the ‘Asgard’ superphylum, a group of uncultivated archaea that, as...

Data from: Differential changes with age in multiscale entropy of electromyography signals from leg muscles during treadmill walking

Hyun Gu Kang & Jonathan B. Dingwell
Age-related gait changes may be due to the loss of complexity in the neuromuscular system. This theory is disputed due to inconsistent results from single-scale analyses. Also, behavioral adaptations may confound these changes. We examined whether EMG dynamics during gait is less complex in older adults over a range of timescales using the multiscale entropy method, and whether slower walking attenuates this effect. Surface EMG was measured from the left vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris...

Data from: Plastome sequencing of ten nonmodel crop species uncovers a large insertion of mitochondrial DNA in cashew

Samar O. Rabah, Chaehee Lee, Nahid H. Hajrah, Rania M. Makki, Hesham F. Alharby, Alawiah M. Alhebshi, Jamal S. M. Sabir, Robert K. Jansen, Tracey A. Ruhlman & Jamal S.M. Sabir
In plant evolution, intracellular gene transfer (IGT) is a prevalent, ongoing process. While nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are known to integrate foreign DNA via IGT and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), plastid genomes (plastomes) have resisted foreign DNA incorporation and only recently has IGT been uncovered in the plastomes of a few land plants. In this study, we completed plastome sequences for l0 crop species and describe a number of structural features including variation in gene...

Data from: Dissecting signal and noise in diatom chloroplast protein encoding genes with phylogenetic information profiling

Edward C. Theriot, Matthew P. Ashworth, Teofil Nakov, Elizabeth Ruck, Robert K. Jansen & Matt P. Ashworth
Previous analyses of single diatom chloroplast protein-encoded genes recovered results highly incongruent with both traditional phylogenies and phylogenies derived from the nuclear encoded small subunit (SSU) gene. Our analysis here of six individual chloroplast genes (atpB, psaA, psaB, psbA, psbC and rbcL) obtained similar anomalous results. However, phylogenetic noise in these genes did not appear to be correlated, and their concatenation appeared to effectively sum their collective signal. We empirically demonstrated the value of combining...

Data from: Fossil evidence of the avian vocal organ from the Mesozoic

Julia A. Clarke, Sankar Chatterjee, Zhiheng Li, Tobias Riede, Federico Angolin, Franz Goller, Marcelo P. Isasi, Daniel R. Martinioni, Francisco J. Mussel & Fernando E. Novas
From complex songs to simple honks, birds produce sounds using a unique vocal organ called the syrinx1, 2. Located close to the heart at the tracheobronchial junction, vocal folds or membranes attached to modified mineralized rings vibrate to produce sound1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Syringeal components were not thought to commonly enter the fossil record6, and the few reported fossilized parts of the syrinx are geologically young8, 9, 10, 11 (from the Pleistocene...

Data from: Herbivory enhances the diversity of primary producers in pond ecosystems

Mathew A. Leibold, Spencer R. Hall, Val H. Smith & David A. Lytle
Diversity of primary producer is often surprisingly high, despite few limiting factors such as nutrients and light to facilitate species coexistence. In theory, the presence of herbivores could increase the diversity of primary producers, resolving this “paradox of the plankton”. Little experimental evidence supports this natural enemies hypothesis, but previous tests suffer from several deficiencies. Previous experiments often did not allow for multigeneration effects; utilized low diversity assemblages of herbivores; and limited opportunities for new...

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