281 Works

Lost in Translation

Z.W. Taylor
As our world becomes increasingly globalized in social, economic, and political contexts, U.S. students choose to study abroad to develop their international communication skills, cross-cultural competencies, and second or third languages (NAFSA, 2017). However, an under-researched element of the international education enrollment process is how readable and translated international admissions instructions are, especially for language-minority students whose first language is not English, comprising over 92 million people living in the U.S. (Dillinger, 2017). Examining the...

Cassowary gloss and a novel form of structural color in birds

Chad Eliason & Julia Clarke
One of the two lineages of extant birds resulting from its deepest split, Palaeognathae, has been reported not to exhibit structural coloration in feathers, affecting inferences of ancestral coloration mechanisms in extant birds. Structural coloration in facial skin and eggshells have been shown in the lineage, but not feathers. Here, we report the first evidence for two distinct mechanisms of structural color in palaeognath feathers. One extinct volant clade, Lithornithidae, shows evidence of elongate melanin-containing...

Data from: A new dissorophoid temnospondyl from the Allegheny Group (Late Westphalian, Carboniferous) of Five Points, Mahoning County, Ohio (USA)

Rainer Schoch, Amy Henrici & Robert Hook
A small temnospondyl skull from the Upper Carboniferous Allegheny Group of Five Points, Ohio, is referred to a new dissorophoid, Palodromeus bairdi n. gen n. sp. The complete skull with mandibles is preserved in counterparts. It is characterized by (1) elongated slit-like choana, (2) postfrontal, postorbital, and supratemporal bearing a distinct ridge, and (3) reduced parietal only two-thirds the length of the frontal. Phylogenetic analysis confirms a dichotomy between amphibamiforms and olsoniforms and places Palodromeus...

Data from: Bee phenology is predicted by climatic variation and functional traits

Michael Stemkovski, Will Pearse, Sean Griffin, Gabriella Pardee, Jason Gibbs, Terry Griswold, John Neff, Ryan Oram, Molly RightMyer, Cory Sheffield, Karen Wright, Brian Inouye, David Inouye & Rebecca Irwin
Climate change is shifting the environmental cues that determine the phenology of interacting species. Plant-pollinator systems may be susceptible to temporal mismatch if bees and flowering plants differ in their phenological responses to warming temperatures. While the cues that trigger flowering are well-understood, little is known about what determines bee phenology. Using Generalized Additive Models, we analyzed time-series data representing 67 bee species collected over nine years in the Colorado Rocky Mountains to perform the...

Switchgrass v5 4-way (AP13 x DAC, WBC x VS16) genetic map

John Lovell, Adam Healey, Jeremy Schmutz & Thomas Juenger
Here we present the genetic map construction methods for the switchgrass 4-way mapping population. The map spans 750 recombinant 4-way (pseudo F2) progeny genotyped at 4700 markers. These data are formatted for simple input into R/qtl and most other QTL mapping programs.

Data from: Gene expression associated with white syndromes in a reef building coral, Acropora hyacinthus

Rachel M. Wright, Galina V. Aglyamova, Eli Meyer & Mikhail V. Matz
Background: Corals are capable of launching diverse immune defenses at the site of direct contact with pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms of this activity and the colony-wide effects of such stressors remain poorly understood. Here we compared gene expression profiles in eight healthy Acropora hyacinthus colonies against eight colonies exhibiting tissue loss commonly associated with white syndromes, all collected from a natural reef environment near Palau. Two types of tissues were sampled from diseased corals:...

Data from: Frequent and seasonally variable sublethal anthrax infections are accompanied by short-lived immunity in an endemic system

Carrie A. Cizauskas, Steven E. Bellan, Wendy C. Turner, Russell E. Vance & Wayne M. Getz
1. Few studies have examined host-pathogen interactions in wildlife from an immunological perspective, particularly in the context of seasonal and longitudinal dynamics. In addition, though most ecological immunology studies employ serological antibody assays, endpoint titer determination is usually based on subjective criteria and needs to be made more objective. 2. Despite the fact that anthrax is an ancient and emerging zoonotic infectious disease found worldwide, its natural ecology is not well understood. In particular, little...

Data from: Evolutionary renovation of L/M opsin polymorphism confers a fruit discrimination advantage to ateline New World monkeys

Yoshifumi Matsumoto, Chihiro Hiramatsu, Yuka Matsushita, Norihiro Ozawa, Ryuichi Ashino, Makiko Nakata, Satoshi Kasagi, Anthony Di Fiore, Colleen Schaffner, Filippo Aureli, Amanda D. Melin, Shoji Kawamura & Colleen M. Schaffner
New World monkeys exhibit prominent color vision variation due to allelic polymorphism of the long-to-middle wavelength (L/M) opsin gene. The known spectral variation of L/M opsins in primates is broadly determined by amino acid composition at three sites: 180, 277 and 285 (the “three-sites” rule). However, two L/M opsin alleles found in the black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) are known exceptions, presumably due to novel mutations. The spectral separation of the two L/M photopigments is...

Data from: The genetic architecture of constitutive and induced trichome density in two new RIL populations of Arabidopsis thaliana: phenotypic plasticity, epistasis, and bidirectional leaf damage response

Rebecca H. Bloomer, Alan M. Lloyd & V. Vaughan Symonds
Background: Herbivory imposes an important selective pressure on plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana leaf trichomes provide a key defense against insect herbivory; however, trichome production incurs a fitness cost in the absence of herbivory. Previous work on A. thaliana has shown an increase in trichome density in response to leaf damage, suggesting a mechanism by which the cost associated with constitutively high trichome density might be mitigated; however, the genetic basis of trichome density induction has...

Data from: Emergence timing and fitness consequences of variation in seed oil composition in Arabidopsis thaliana

Sandra E. Pelc & C. Randal Linder
Early seedling emergence can increase plant fitness under competition. Seed oil composition (the types and relative amounts of fatty acids in the oils) may play an important role in determining emergence timing and early growth rate in oilseeds. Saturated fatty acids provide more energy per carbon atom than unsaturated fatty acids but have substantially higher melting points (when chain length is held constant). This characteristic forms the basis of an adaptive hypothesis that lower melting...

Data from: Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIb polymorphism influences gut microbiota composition and diversity

Daniel Bolnick, Lisa Snowberg, William Stutz, Greg Caporaso, Christian Lauber, Rob Knight, Daniel I. Bolnick, Chris Lauber, J. Gregory Caporaso, William E. Stutz & Lisa K. Snowberg
Individuals harbor diverse communities of symbiotic bacteria, which differ dramatically among host individuals. This heterogeneity poses an immunological challenge of distinguishing between mutualistic and pathogenic members of diverse and host-specific microbial communities. We propose that Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC) genotypes contribute to recognition and regulation of gut microbes, and thus MHC polymorphism contributes to microbial variation among hosts. Here, we confirm that, within a single wild vertebrate population of threespine stickleback, different MHC II...

Data from: Does plasticity enhance or dampen phenotypic parallelism? A test with three lake-stream stickleback pairs.

Krista B. Oke, Mehvish Bukhari, Renaud Kaeuffer, Gregor Rolshausen, Katja Räsänen, Daniel I. Bolnick, Catherine L. Peichel & Andrew P. Hendry
Parallel (and convergent) phenotypic variation is most often studied in the wild, where it is difficult to disentangle genetic versus environmentally-induced effects. As a result, the potential contributions of phenotypic plasticity to parallelism (and non-parallelism) are rarely evaluated in a formal sense. Phenotypic parallelism could be enhanced by plasticity that causes stronger parallelism across populations in the wild than would be expected from genetic differences alone. Phenotypic parallelism could be dampened if site-specific plasticity induced...

Data from: Bacterial cooperation causes systematic errors in pathogen risk assessment due to the failure of the independent action hypothesis

Daniel M. Cornforth, Andrew Matthews, Sam P. Brown & Ben Raymond
The Independent Action Hypothesis (IAH) states that pathogenic individuals (cells, spores, virus particles etc.) behave independently of each other, so that each has an independent probability of causing systemic infection or death. The IAH is not just of basic scientific interest; it forms the basis of our current estimates of infectious disease risk in humans. Despite the important role of the IAH in managing disease interventions for food and water-borne pathogens, experimental support for the...

Data from: Controlled measurement and comparative analysis of cellular components in E. coli reveals broad regulatory changes in response to glucose starvation

John R. Houser, Craig Barnhart, Daniel R. Boutz, Sean M. Carrol, Aurko Dasgupta, Joshua K. Michener, Brittany D. Needham, Ophelia Papoulas, Viswanadham Sridhara, Dariya K. Sydykova, Christopher J. Marx, M. Stephen Trent, Jeffery E. Barrick, Edward M. Marcotte, Claus O. Wilke, Jeffrey E. Barrick & Sean M. Carroll
How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not...

Data from: Evolutionary shifts in the melanin-based color system of birds

Chad M. Eliason, Matthew D. Shawkey, Julia A. Clark & Julia A. Clarke
Melanin pigments contained in organelles (melanosomes) impart earthy colors to feathers. Such melanin-based colors are distributed across birds and thought to be the ancestral color-producing mechanism in birds. However, we have had limited data on melanin-based color and melanosome diversity in Palaeognathae, which includes the flighted tinamous and large-bodied, flightless ratites and is the sister taxon to all other extant birds. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry to assess melanosome morphology and quantify...

Data from: Cline coupling and uncoupling in a stickleback hybrid zone

Timothy H. Vines, Anne C. Dalziel, Arianne Albert, Thor Veen, Patricia Marita Schulte, Dolph Schluter & Arianne Y. K. Albert
Strong ecological selection on a genetic locus can maintain allele frequency differences between populations in different environments, even in the face of hybridization. When alleles at divergent loci come into tight linkage disequilibrium, selection acts on them as a unit and can significantly reduce gene flow. For populations interbreeding across a hybrid zone, linkage disequilibria between loci can force clines to share the same slopes and centers. However, strong ecological selection on a locus can...

Data from: The plumage and colouration of an enantiornithine bird from the Early Cretaceous of China

Jennifer A. Peteya, Julia A. Clarke, Quanguo Li, Ke-Qin Gao & Matthew D. Shawkey
Brilliant colour displays and diverse feather morphologies that are often sexual ornaments are common throughout much of extant Avialae. Here we describe a new basal enantiornithine bird specimen recovered from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning Province in northeastern China. We present new information on the plumage of Bohaiornithidae as well as the first detailed colour reconstruction of an enantiornithine bird. The new specimen retains subadult skeletal characteristics, including periosteal pitting of the long...

Data from: Frequency dependence limits divergent evolution by favouring rare immigrants over residents

Daniel I. Bolnick & William E. Stutz
Two distinct forms of natural selection promote adaptive biological diversity. Divergent selection occurs when different environments favour different phenotypes, leading to increased differences between populations. Negative frequency-dependent selection occurs when rare variants within a population are favoured over common ones, increasing diversity within populations. These two diversifying forces promote genetic variation at different spatial scales, and may act in opposition, but their relative effects remain unclear because they are rarely measured concurrently. Here we show...

Data from: Sexual fidelity trade-offs promote regulatory variation in the prairie vole brain

Mariam Okhovat, Alejandro Berrio, Gerard Wallace, Alexander G. Ophir & Steven M. Phelps
Individual variation in social behavior seems ubiquitous, but we know little about how it relates to brain diversity. Among monogamous prairie voles, levels of vasopressin receptor (encoded by the gene avpr1a) in brain regions related to spatial memory predict male space use and sexual fidelity in the field. We find that trade-offs between the benefits of male fidelity and infidelity are reflected in patterns of territorial intrusion, offspring paternity, avpr1a expression, and the evolutionary fitness...

Data from: Plastome sequencing of ten nonmodel crop species uncovers a large insertion of mitochondrial DNA in cashew

Samar O. Rabah, Chaehee Lee, Nahid H. Hajrah, Rania M. Makki, Hesham F. Alharby, Alawiah M. Alhebshi, Jamal S. M. Sabir, Robert K. Jansen, Tracey A. Ruhlman & Jamal S.M. Sabir
In plant evolution, intracellular gene transfer (IGT) is a prevalent, ongoing process. While nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are known to integrate foreign DNA via IGT and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), plastid genomes (plastomes) have resisted foreign DNA incorporation and only recently has IGT been uncovered in the plastomes of a few land plants. In this study, we completed plastome sequences for l0 crop species and describe a number of structural features including variation in gene...

Data from: Asgard archaea illuminate the origin of eukaryotic cellular complexity

Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Eva F. Caceres, Jimmy H. Saw, Disa Bäckström, Lina Juzokaite, Emmelien Vancaester, Kiley W. Seitz, Karthik Anantharaman, Piotr Starnawski, Kasper U. Kjeldsen, Matthew B. Stott, Takuro Nunoura, Jillian F. Banfield, Andreas Schramm, Brett J. Baker, Anja Spang & Thijs J. G. Ettema
The origin and cellular complexity of eukaryotes represent a major enigma in biology. Current data support scenarios in which an archaeal host cell and an alphaproteobacterial (mitochondrial) endosymbiont merged together, resulting in the first eukaryotic cell. The host cell is related to Lokiarchaeota, an archaeal phylum with many eukaryotic features. The emergence of the structural complexity that characterizes eukaryotic cells remains unclear. Here we describe the ‘Asgard’ superphylum, a group of uncultivated archaea that, as...

Data from: A shift from exploitation to interference competition with increasing density affects population and community dynamics

Erica M. Holdridge, Catalina Cuellar-Gempeler & Casey P. TerHorst
Intraspecific competition influences population and community dynamics and occurs via two mechanisms. Exploitative competition is an indirect effect that occurs through use of a shared resource and depends on resource availability. Interference competition occurs by obstructing access to a resource and may not depend on resource availability. Our study tested whether the strength of interference competition changes with protozoa population density. We grew experimental microcosms of protozoa and bacteria under different combinations of protozoan density...

Data from: Differential changes with age in multiscale entropy of electromyography signals from leg muscles during treadmill walking

Hyun Gu Kang & Jonathan B. Dingwell
Age-related gait changes may be due to the loss of complexity in the neuromuscular system. This theory is disputed due to inconsistent results from single-scale analyses. Also, behavioral adaptations may confound these changes. We examined whether EMG dynamics during gait is less complex in older adults over a range of timescales using the multiscale entropy method, and whether slower walking attenuates this effect. Surface EMG was measured from the left vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris...

Data from: A hierarchical model of whole assemblage island biogeography

Jesse R. Lasky, Timothy H. Keitt, Brian C. Weeks & Evan P. Economo
Island systems have long played a central role in the development of ecology and evolutionary biology. However, while many empirical studies suggest species differ in vital biogeographic rates, such as dispersal abilities, quantitative methods have had difficulty incorporating such differences into analyses of whole-assemblages. In particular, differences in dispersal abilities among species can cause variation in the spatial clustering and localization of species distributions. Here, we develop a single, hierarchical Bayes, assemblage-wide model of 252...

Data from: Dissecting signal and noise in diatom chloroplast protein encoding genes with phylogenetic information profiling

Edward C. Theriot, Matthew P. Ashworth, Teofil Nakov, Elizabeth Ruck, Robert K. Jansen & Matt P. Ashworth
Previous analyses of single diatom chloroplast protein-encoded genes recovered results highly incongruent with both traditional phylogenies and phylogenies derived from the nuclear encoded small subunit (SSU) gene. Our analysis here of six individual chloroplast genes (atpB, psaA, psaB, psbA, psbC and rbcL) obtained similar anomalous results. However, phylogenetic noise in these genes did not appear to be correlated, and their concatenation appeared to effectively sum their collective signal. We empirically demonstrated the value of combining...

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