17 Works

Data from: Repeated losses of PRDM9-directed recombination despite the conservation of PRDM9 across vertebrates

Zachary Baker, Molly Schumer, Yuki Haba, Lisa Bashkirova, Chris Holland, Gil G Rosenthal & Molly Przeworski
Studies of highly diverged species have revealed two mechanisms by which meiotic recombination is directed to the genome—through PRDM9 binding or by targeting promoter-like features—that lead to dramatically different evolutionary dynamics of hotspots. Here, we identify PRDM9 orthologs from genome and transcriptome data in 225 species. We find the complete PRDM9 ortholog across distantly related vertebrates but, despite this broad conservation, infer a minimum of six partial and three complete losses. Strikingly, taxa carrying the...

Data from: Etiology of respiratory tract infections in the community and clinic in Ilorin, Nigeria

Olatunji Kolawole, Michael Oguntoye, Tina Dam & Rumi Chunara
Objective: Recognizing increasing interest in community disease surveillance globally, the goal of this study was to investigate whether respiratory viruses circulating in the community may be represented through clinical (hospital) surveillance in Nigeria. Results: Children were selected via convenience sampling from communities and a tertiary care center (n = 91) during spring 2017 in Ilorin, Nigeria. Nasal swabs were collected and tested using polymerase chain reaction. The majority (79.1%) of subjects were under 6 years...

Data from: Speciation over the edge: gene flow among non-human primate species across a formidable biogeographic barrier

Ben J. Evans, Anthony J. Tosi, Kai Zeng, Jonathan Dushoff, André Corvelo & Don J. Melnick
Many genera of terrestrial vertebrates diversified exclusively on one or the other side of Wallace’s Line, which lies between Borneo and Sulawesi islands in Southeast Asia, and demarcates one of the sharpest biogeographic transition zones in the world. Macaque monkeys are unusual among vertebrate genera in that they are distributed on both sides of Wallace‘s Line, raising the question of whether dispersal across this barrier was an evolutionary one-off or a more protracted exchange—and if...

Data from: Male mate choice via cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones drives reproductive isolation between Drosophila species

Michael P. Shahandeh, Alison Pischedda & Thomas L. Turner
Mate discrimination is a key mechanism restricting gene flow between species. While studied extensively with respect to female mate choice, mechanisms of male mate choice between species are far less studied. Thus, we have little knowledge of the relative frequency, importance, or overall contribution of male mate discrimination to reproductive isolation. In the present study, we estimated the relative contributions of male and female choice to reproductive isolation between Drosophila simulans and D. sechellia, and...

Data from: Stronger social bonds do not always predict greater longevity in a gregarious primate

Nicole A. Thompson & Marina Cords
In group-living species, individuals often have preferred affiliative social partners, with whom ties or bonds can confer advantages that correspond with greater fitness. For example, in adult female baboons and juvenile horses, individuals with stronger or more social ties experience greater survival. We used detailed behavioral and life history records to explore the relationship between tie quality and survival in a gregarious monkey (Cercopithecus mitis stuhlmanni), while controlling for dominance rank, group size, and life...

Data from: Fragility of foot process morphology in kidney podocytes arises from chaotic spatial propagation of cytoskeletal instability

Cibele V. Falkenberg, Evren U. Azeloglu, Mark Stothers, Thomas J. Deerinck, Yibang Chen, John C. He, Mark H. Ellisman, James C. Hone, Ravi Iyenger & Leslie M. Loew
The kidney podocyte's function depends on finger-like projections (foot processes) that interdigitate with those from neighboring cells to form the glomerular filtration barrier. The integrity of the barrier depends on spatial control of dynamics of actin cytoskeleton in the foot processes. We determined how imbalances in regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics can result in pathological morphology. We obtained 3-D electron microscopy images of podocytes and used quantitative features to build dynamical models to investigate how...

Data from: First circumglobal assessment of Southern Hemisphere humpback whale mitochondrial genetic variation and implications for management

Howard C. Rosenbaum, Francine Kershaw, Martin Mendez, Cristina Pomilla, Matthew S. Leslie, Ken P. Findlay, Peter B. Best, Timothy Collins, Michel Vely, Marcia H. Engel, Robert Baldwin, Gianna Minton, Michael Meyer, Lillian Florez-Gonzalez, M. Michael Poole, Nan Hauser, Claire Garrigue, Muriel Brasseur, John Bannister, Megan Anderson, Carlos Olavarria & C. Scott Baker
The description of genetic population structure over a species’ geographic range can provide insights into its evolutionary history and also support effective management efforts. Assessments for globally distributed species are rare, however, requiring significant international coordination and collaboration. The global distribution of demographically discrete populations for the humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae is not fully known, hampering the definition of appropriate management units. Here, we present the first circumglobal assessment of mitochondrial genetic population structure across...

The Million Song Dataset

Thierry Bertin-Mahieux, Daniel P.W. Ellis, Brian Whitman & Paul Lamere
We introduce the Million Song Dataset, a freely-available collection of audio features and metadata for a million contemporary popular music tracks. We describe its creation process, its content, and its possible uses. Attractive features of the Million Song Database include the range of existing resources to which it is linked, and the fact that it is the largest current research dataset in our field. As an illustration, we present year prediction as an example application,...

Data from: Interannual variations in needle and sapwood traits of Pinus edulis branches under an experimental drought

Marceau Guerin, Dario Martin-Benito, Georg Von Arx, Laia Andreu Hayles, Kevin L. Griffin, Rayann Hamdan, Nate G. McDowell, Robert Muscarella, Will Pockman, Pierre Gentine, William Pockman & Laia Andreu-Hayles
1) In the Southwest United States, recent large-scale die-offs of conifers raise the question of their resilience and mortality under droughts. To date, little is known about the interannual structural response to droughts. 2) We hypothesized that piñon pines (Pinus edulis) respond to drought by reducing the drop of leaf water potential in branches from year to year through needle morphological adjustments. We tested our hypothesis using a seven-year experiment in central New Mexico with...

Plant Respiration Modelling with JULES for a changing climate (1860-2100)

C. Huntingford, O.K. Atkin, A. Martinez-De La Torre, L.M. Mercado, M.A. Heskel, A.B. Harper, K.J. Bloomfield, O.S. O'Sullivan, P.B. Reich, K.R. Wythers, E.E. Butler, M. Chen, K.L. Griffin, P. Meir, M.G. Tjoelker, M.H. Turnbull, S. Sitch, A. Wiltshire & Y. Malhi
The dataset contains annual global plant respiration (and related diagnostics, such as Net Primary Productivity, Gross Primary Productivity and soil respiration), applicable for pre-industrial times (taken as year 1860) through to the end of the 21st Century (year 2100). The spatial resolution of the data is 2.5 degrees latitude x 3.75 degrees longitude. These diagnostics are outputs from the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES land surface model) under four different approaches to calcluate leaf...

Data from: Impaired hippocampal place cell dynamics in a mouse model of the 22q11.2 deletion

Jeffrey D. Zaremba, Anastasia Diamantopoulou, Nathan B. Danielson, Andres D. Grosmark, Patrick W. Kaifosh, Jack C. Bowler, Zhenrui Liao, Fraser T. Sparks, Joseph A. Gogos & Attila Losonczy
Hippocampal place cells represent the cellular substrate of episodic memory. Place cell ensembles reorganize to support learning but must also maintain stable representations to facilitate memory recall. Despite extensive research, the learning-related role of place cell dynamics in health and disease remains elusive. Using chronic two-photon Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal area CA1 of wild-type and Df(16)A+/− mice, an animal model of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, one of the most common genetic risk factors for cognitive dysfunction...

Data from: Profound reversible seasonal changes of individual skull size in a mammal

Javier Lázaro, Dina K. N. Dechmann, Scott LaPoint, Martin Wikelski, Moritz Hertel & Dina K.N. Dechmann
Postnatal size changes in most vertebrates are unidirectional and finite once the individual reaches full size. In rare cases, changes of body length may occur in response to harsh environmental conditions. Such reactionary changes are distinct from seasonal, often anticipatory morphological changes, such as the reversible size change of some adult bird brains. A unique pattern of profound anatomical change known as Dehnel’s phenomenon has been described for the body, skull and brain size of...

Data from: Major urinary protein levels are associated with social status and context in mouse social hierarchies

Won Lee, Amber Khan & James P. Curley
We have previously shown that male mice living in groups of 12 males establish and maintain stable linear social hierarchies with each individual having a defined social rank. However, it is not clear which social cues mice use to signal and recognize their relative social status within their hierarchy. In this study, we investigate how individual social status both in pairs and in groups affects the levels of major urinary proteins (MUPs) and specifically MUP20...

Data from: Mapping polyclonal HIV-1 antibody responses via next-generation neutralization fingerprinting

Nicole A. Doria-Rose, Han R. Altae-Tran, Ryan S. Roark, Stephen D. Schmidt, Matthew S. Sutton, Mark K. Louder, Gwo-Yu Chuang, Robert T. Bailer, Valerie Cortez, Rui Kong, Krisha McKee, Sijy O'Dell, Felicia Wang, Salim S. Abdool Karim, James M. Binley, Mark Connors, Barton F. Haynes, Malcolm A. Martin, David C. Montefiori, Lynn Morris, Julie Overbaugh, Peter D. Kwong, John R. Mascola, Ivelin S. Georgiev & Sijy O’Dell
Computational neutralization fingerprinting, NFP, is an efficient and accurate method for predicting the epitope specificities of polyclonal antibody responses to HIV-1 infection. Here, we present next-generation NFP algorithms that substantially improve prediction accuracy for individual donors and enable serologic analysis for entire cohorts. Specifically, we developed algorithms for: (a) selection of optimized virus neutralization panels for NFP analysis, (b) estimation of NFP prediction confidence for each serum sample, and (c) identification of sera with potentially...

Data from: Nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in higher-latitude North America is not constrained by diversity

Duncan N. L. Menge, Sarah A. Batterman, Wenying Liao, Benton N. Taylor, Jeremy W. Lichstein & Gregorio Ángeles-Pérez
The rarity of nitrogen (N)-fixing trees in frequently N-limited higher-latitude (here, > 35°) forests is a central biogeochemical paradox. One hypothesis for their rarity is that evolutionary constraints limit N-fixing tree diversity, preventing N-fixing species from filling available niches in higher-latitude forests. Here, we test this hypothesis using data from the USA and Mexico. N-fixing trees comprise only a slightly smaller fraction of taxa at higher vs. lower latitudes (8% vs. 11% of genera), despite...

Data from: Reducing therapeutic misconception: a randomized intervention trial in hypothetical clinical trials

Paul P. Christopher, Paul S. Appelbaum, Debbie Truong, Karen Albert, Louise Maranda, Charles Lidz & Charles Lidz
Background: Participants in clinical trials frequently fail to appreciate key differences between research and clinical care. This phenomenon, known as therapeutic misconception, undermines informed consent to clinical research, but to date there have been no effective interventions to reduce it and concerns have been expressed that to do so might impede recruitment. We determined whether a scientific reframing intervention reduces therapeutic misconception without significantly reducing willingness to participate in hypothetical clinical trials. Methods: This prospective...

Data from: A continuous morphological approach to study the evolution of pollen in a phylogenetic context: an example with the order Myrtales

Ricardo Kriebel, Mohammad Khabbazian & Kenneth J. Sytsma
The study of pollen morphology has historically allowed evolutionary biologists to assess phylogenetic relationships among Angiosperms, as well as to better understand the fossil record. During this process, pollen has mainly been studied by discretizing some of its main characteristics such as size, shape, and exine ornamentation. One large plant clade in which pollen has been used this way for phylogenetic inference and character mapping is the order Myrtales, composed by the small families Alzateaceae,...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • Columbia University
    17
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    1
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Colegio de Postgraduados
    1