7 Works

Data from: Multiple mating reveals complex patterns of assortative mating by personality and body size

Pierre-Olivier Montiglio, Tina W. Wey, Ann T. Chang, Sean Fogarty & Andrew Sih
1. Understanding patterns of non-random mating is central to predicting the consequences of sexual selection. Most studies quantifying assortative mating focus on testing for correlations among partners’ phenotypes in mated pairs. Few studies have distinguished between assortative mating arising from preferences for similar partners (expressed by all or a subset of the population), versus from phenotypic segregation in the environment. Also, few studies have assessed the robustness of assortative mating against temporal changes in social...

Data from: Does vocal learning accelerate acoustic diversification? Evolution of contact calls in neotropical parrots

Angela Medina-García, Marcelo Araya-Salas & Timothy F. Wright
Learning has been traditionally though to accelerate the evolutionary change of behavioral traits. We evaluated the evolutionary rate of learned vocalizations and the interplay of morphology and ecology in the evolution of these signals. We examined contact calls of 51 species of Neotropical parrots from the tribe Arini. Parrots are ideal subjects due to their wide range of body sizes and habitats, and their open-ended vocal learning that allows them to modify their calls throughout...

Data from: Social feedback and the emergence of rank in animal society

Elizabeth A. Hobson & Simon DeDeo
Dominance hierarchies are group-level properties that emerge from the aggression of individuals. Although individuals can gain critical benefits from their position in a hierarchy, we do not understand how real-world hierarchies form. Nor do we understand what signals and decision-rules individuals use to construct and maintain hierarchies in the absence of simple cues such as size or spatial location. A study of conflict in two groups of captive monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) found that a...

Data from: Shared genetic diversity across the global invasive range of the Monk parakeet suggests a common restricted geographic origin and the possibility of convergent selection

Pim Edelaar, Severine Roques, Elizabeth A. Hobson, Anders Gonçalves Da Silva, Michael L. Avery, Michael A. Russello, Juan Carlos Senar, Timothy F. Wright, Martina Carrete & Jose Luis Tella
While genetic diversity is hypothesized to be an important factor explaining invasion success, there is no consensus yet on how variation in source populations or demographic processes affects invasiveness. We used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic and microsatellite genotypic data to investigate levels of genetic variation and reconstruct the history of replicate invasions on three continents in a globally invasive bird, the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus). We evaluated whether genetic diversity at invasive sites could be explained...

Data from: Rapid genetic restoration of a keystone species exhibiting delayed demographic response

Bradley J. Cosentino, Robert L. Schooley, Brandon T. Bestelmeyer, Alison J. McCarthy & Kevin Sierzega
Genetic founder effects are often expected when animals colonize restored habitat in fragmented landscapes, but empirical data on genetic responses to restoration are limited. We examined the genetic response of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) to landscape-scale grassland restoration in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico, USA. D. spectabilis is a grassland specialist and keystone species. At sites treated with herbicide to remove shrubs, colonization by D. spectabilis is slow and populations persist at low...

Data from: Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality

Jesse Marczyk
Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct...

Data from: Plastid genome sequences of legumes reveal parallel inversions and multiple losses of rps16 in papilionoids

Erika N. Schwarz, Tracey A. Ruhlman, Jamal S. M. Sabir, Nahid H. Ajarah, Njud S. Alharbi, Abdulrahman L. Al-Malki, C. Donovan Bailey, Robert K. Jansen & Nahid H. Hajrah
To date, publicly available plastid genomes of legumes have for the most part been limited to the subfamily Papilionoideae. Here we report 13 new plastid genomes of legumes spanning all three subfamilies. The genomes representing Caesalpinioideae and Mimosoideae are highly conserved in gene content and gene order, similar to the ancestral angiosperm genome organization. Genomes within the Papilionoideae, however, have reduced sizes due to deletions in nine intergenic spacers primarily in the large single copy...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • New Mexico State University
    7
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Santa Fe Institute
    1
  • Monash University
    1
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    1
  • King Abdulaziz University
    1
  • Pablo de Olavide University
    1
  • University of British Columbia
    1