41 Works

Dataset for 'When do circumstances excuse?'

Simon Cullen
Abstract: When explaining human actions, people usually focus on a small subset of potential causes. What leads us to prefer certain explanations for valenced actions over others? The present studies indicate that our moral attitudes often predict our explanatory preferences far better than our beliefs about how causally sensitive actions are to features of the actor's environment. *Study 1* found that high-prejudice participants were much more likely to endorse non-agential explanations of an erotic same-sex...

Data from: Dry-season decline in tree sapflux is correlated with leaf turgor loss point in a tropical rainforest

Isabelle Maréchaux, Damien Bonal, Megan K. Bartlett, Benoît Burban, Sabrina Coste, Elodie A. Courtois, Maguy Dulormne, Jean-Yves Goret, Eléonore Mira, Ariane Mirabel, Lawren Sack, Clément Stahl & Jerome Chave
1. Water availability is a key determinant of forest ecosystem function and tree species distributions. While droughts are increasing in frequency in many ecosystems, including in the tropics, plant responses to water supply vary with species and drought intensity, and are therefore difficult to model. Based on physiological first principles, we hypothesized that trees with a lower turgor loss point (πtlp), i.e., a more negative leaf water potential at wilting, would maintain water transport for...

Data from: Mapping the imprint of biotic interactions on β-diversity

Marc Ohlmann, Florent Mazel, Loïc Chalmandrier, Stéphane Bec, Eric Coissac, Ludovic Gielly, Johan Pansu, Vincent Schilling, Pierre Taberlet, Lucie Zinger, Jerome Chave & Wilfried Thuiller
Investigating how trophic interactions influence the β-diversity of meta-communities is of paramount importance to understanding the processes shaping biodiversity distribution. Here, we apply a statistical method for inferring the strength of spatial dependencies between pairs of species groups. Using simulated community data generated from a multi-trophic model, we showed that this method can approximate biotic interactions in multi-trophic communities based on β-diversity patterns across groups. When applied to soil multi-trophic communities along an elevational gradient...

Data from: Estimating infection prevalence: best practices and their theoretical underpinnings

Ian F. Miller, India Schneider-Crease, Charles L. Nunn & Michael P. Muehlenbein
Accurately estimating infection prevalence is fundamental to the study of population health, disease dynamics, and infection risk factors. Prevalence is estimated as the proportion of infected individuals (“individual-based estimation”), but is also estimated as the proportion of samples from which the disease-causing organisms are recovered (“anonymous estimation”). The latter method is often used when researchers lack information on individual host identity, which can occur during noninvasive sampling of wild populations or when the individual that...

Data from: Natural selection interacts with recombination to shape the evolution of hybrid genomes

Molly Schumer, Chenling Xu, Daniel L Powell, Arun Durvasula, Laurits Skov, Chris Holland, John C Blazier, Sriram Sankararaman, Peter Andolfatto, Gil G Rosenthal & Molly Przeworski
To investigate the consequences of hybridization between species, we studied three replicate hybrid populations that formed naturally between two swordtail fish species, estimating their fine-scale genetic map and inferring ancestry along the genomes of 690 individuals. In all three populations, ancestry from the “minor” parental species is more common in regions of high recombination and where there is linkage to fewer putative targets of selection. The same patterns are apparent in a reanalysis of human...

Data from: Competing for blood: the ecology of parasite resource competition in human malaria-helminth co-infections

Sarah A. Budischak, Aprilianto E. Wiria, Firdaus Hamid, Linda J. Wammes, Maria M. M. Kaisar, Lisette Van Lieshout, Erliyani Sartono, Taniawati Supali, Maria Yazdanbakhsh & Andrea L. Graham
Ecological theory suggests that co-infecting parasite species can interact within hosts directly, via host immunity and/or via resource competition. In mice, competition for red blood cells (RBCs) between malaria and bloodsucking helminths can regulate malaria population dynamics, but the importance of RBC competition in human hosts was unknown. We analyzed infection density (i.e. the concentration of parasites in infected hosts), from a 2-year deworming study of over 4,000 human subjects. After accounting for resource-use differences...

The Influence of Context Processing Demands on Cognitive Control

Huangqi Jiang & Brooke Macnamara

Data from: Sexually dimorphic gene expression and transcriptome evolution provides mixed evidence for a fast‐Z effect in Heliconius

Ana Pinharanda, Marjolaine Rousselle, Simon H. Martin, Joseph J. Hanly, John W. Davey, Sujai Kumar, Nicolas Galtier & Chris D. Jiggins
Sex chromosomes have different evolutionary properties compared to autosomes due to their hemizygous nature. In particular, recessive mutations are more readily exposed to selection, which can lead to faster rates of molecular evolution. Here, we report patterns of gene expression and molecular evolution for a group of butterflies. First, we improve the completeness of the Heliconius melpomene reference annotation, a neotropical butterfly with a ZW sex determination system. Then, we analyse RNA from male and...

Reproducibility Project: Psychology

Christopher Anderson, Joanna Anderson, Marcel van Assen, Peter Attridge, Angela Attwood, Jordan Axt, Molly Babel, Štěpán Bahník, Erica Baranski, Michael Barnett-Cowan, Elizabeth Bartmess, Jennifer Beer, Raoul Bell, Heather Bentley, Don van den Bergh, Leah Beyan, Bobby den Bezemer, Denny Borsboom, Annick Bosch, Frank Bosco, Sara Bowman, Mark Brandt, Erin Braswell, Hilmar Brohmer, Benjamin Brown … & James Grange
Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available.

Data from: Incomplete host immunity favors the evolution of virulence in an emergent pathogen

Arietta E. Fleming-Davies, Paul D. Williams, André A. Dhondt, Andrew P. Dobson, Wesley A. Hochachka, Ariel E. Leon, David H. Ley, Erik E. Osnas & Dana M. Hawley
Immune memory evolved to protect hosts from reinfection, but incomplete responses that allow future reinfection might inadvertently select for more harmful pathogens. We present empirical and modeling evidence that incomplete immunity promotes the evolution of higher virulence in a natural host-pathogen system. We performed sequential infections of house finches with Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains of varying virulence. Virulent bacterial strains generated stronger host protection against reinfection than less virulent strains, and thus excluded less virulent strains...

Data from: How do lianas and vines influence competitive differences and niche differences among tree species? Concepts and a case study in a tropical forest

Helene C. Muller-Landau & Marco D. Visser
1. Lianas and other climbing plants are structural parasites of trees, generally reducing host tree survival, growth, and reproduction, yet their influences on the outcome of competition among tree species have remained largely unexplored. 2. We propose that there are three distinct components to liana-tree interactions: prevalence, defined as the proportion of infested trees; load, defined as the mean liana cover on infested trees; and tolerance, defined as the effect of a given level of...

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Paip2 is localized to active promoters and loaded onto nascent mRNA in Drosophila

Zaur M. Kachaev, Lyubov A. Lebedeva, Eugene N. Kozlov, Ilya Y. Toropygin, Paul Schedl & Yulii V. Shidlovskii
Paip2 (Poly(A)-binding protein – interacting protein 2) is a conserved metazoan-specific protein that has been implicated in regulating the translation and stability of mRNAs. However, we have found that Paip2 is not restricted to the cytoplasm but is also found in the nucleus in Drosophila embryos, salivary glands, testes, and tissue culture cells. Nuclear Paip2 is associated with chromatin, and in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments it maps to the promoter regions of active genes. However, this...

Data from: Rising CO2 accelerates phosphorus and molybdenum limitation of N2-fixation in young tropical trees

Annette M. Trierweiler, Klaus Winter & Lars O. Hedin
Background and Aims: Nitrogen fixation may be critical for supplying the nitrogen (N) needed to maintain the tropical carbon sink in a world of rising atmospheric CO2. However, we do not know whether increased CO2 acts to exacerbate nutrient limitation on the fixation process itself. We experimentally test this idea by growing N2-fixing plants in pre-Industrial (280 ppm), present-day (400 ppm), and doubled (800 ppm) atmospheric CO2. Methods: In a greenhouse experiment, we grew tree...

Data from: Rapid environmental effects on gut nematode susceptibility in rewilded mice

Jacqueline M. Leung, Sarah A. Budischak, Hao Chung-The, Christina Hansen, Rowann Bowcutt, Rebecca Neill, Mitch Shellman, P'ng Loke, Andrea L. Graham, Mitchell Shellman, Hao Chung The & P’ng Loke
Genetic and environmental factors shape host susceptibility to infection, but how and how rapidly environmental variation might alter the susceptibility of mammalian genotypes remains unknown. Here, we investigate the impacts of seminatural environments upon the nematode susceptibility profiles of inbred C57BL/6 mice. We hypothesized that natural exposure to microbes might directly (e.g., via trophic interactions) or indirectly (e.g., via microbe-induced immune responses) alter the hatching, growth, and survival of nematodes in mice housed outdoors. We...

Nitrogen fixation and phosphatase activity of 97 nitrogen-fixing and non-fixing trees in Panama

S.A. Batterman, J.S. Hall, B. Turner, L.O. Hedin, J.K. LaHaela Walter, P. Sheldon & M. Van Breugel
This data includes information about nitrogen fixation, phosphatase activity, plant nitrogen and phosphorus demand and soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability of nitrogen-fixing and non-fixing trees from seven species grown in an experimental plantation at the Agua Salud Native Species Plantation, El Giral, Panama (9°12'50.15''N, 79°43'26''W). Data were collected by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and Princeton University and were analysed by the University of Leeds. This work was funded by the following organisations: Heising-Simons Foundation,...

Data from: High genomic diversity and candidate genes under selection associated with range expansion in eastern coyote (Canis latrans) populations

Elizabeth Heppenheimer, Kristin E. Brzeski, Joseph W. Hinton, Brent R. Patterson, Linda Y. Rutledge, Alexandra L. DeCandia, Tyler Wheeldon, Steven R. Fain, Paul A. Hohenlohe, Roland Kays, Bradley N. White, Michael J. Chamberlain & Bridgett M. VonHoldt
Range expansion is a widespread biological process, with well described theoretical expectations for the genomic outcomes accompanying the colonization of novel ranges. However, comparatively few empirical studies address the genome-wide consequences associated with the range expansion process, particularly in recent or on-going expansions. Here, we assess two recent and distinct eastward expansion fronts of a highly mobile carnivore, the coyote (Canis latrans), to investigate patterns of genomic diversity and identify variants that may have been...

Geographic patterns in morphometric and genetic variation for coyote populations with emphasis on southeastern coyotes

Joseph W Hinton, Elizabeth Heppenheimer, Danny Caudill, Melissa L Karlin, Margaret Walch, Bridgett VonHoldt, Michael J Chamberlain, Kyla M. West, John C. Kilgo, John Joseph Mayer & Karl V. Miller
Prior to 1900, coyotes (Canis latrans) were restricted to the western and central regions of North America, but by the early 2000s coyotes became ubiquitous throughout the eastern United States. Information regarding morphological and genetic structure of coyote populations in the southeastern United States is limited, and where data exist, they are rarely compared to those from other regions of North America. We assessed geographic patterns in morphology and genetics of coyotes with special consideration...

Neutron study of the topological flux model of hydrogen ions in water ice

J.-U. Hoffmann, K. Siemensmeyer, S. Isakov, D. J. P. Morris, B. Klemke, I. Glavatskyi, K. Seiffert, D. A. Tennant, S. Sondhi & R. Moessner
The familiarity of water ice means we often overlook its non-trivial character illustrated, for example, by the many snowflake morphologies resulting from disordered combinations of covalent and hydrogen bonds between hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water ice’s most common phase (Ih) that keep the H_2 O molecular character. Using neutron diffraction on the flat-cone diffractometer E2 at BER-II, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, we probe the atomic scale configuration in the Ih phase of water ice to test...

Data from: Stable social relationships between unrelated females increase individual fitness in a cooperative bird

Christina Riehl & Meghan J. Strong
Social animals often form long-lasting relationships with fellow group members, usually with close kin. In primates, strong social bonds have been associated with increased longevity, offspring survival, and reproductive success. However, little is known about the fitness effects of social bonds between non-kin, especially outside of mammals. In this study, we use long-term field research on a cooperatively breeding bird, the greater ani (Crotophaga major), to ask whether adult females benefit by remaining in long-term...

Deviance from social norms: who are the deviants

Robin Gomila & Elizabeth Paluck
This repository accompanies "The social and psychological characteristics of norm deviants: A field study in a small cohesive university campus", forthcoming in the Journal of Social and Political Psychology.

Data from: Are forest‐shrubland mosaics of the Cape Floristic Region an example of alternate stable states?

Michael D. Cramer, Simon C. Power, Anastas Belev, Lindsay Gillson, William J. Bond, Michael Timm Hoffman, Lars O. Hedin & Lindsey Gillson
The idea of alternate stable states (ASS) has been used to explain the juxtaposition of distinct vegetation types within the same climate regime. ASS may explain the co‐existence of relatively inflammable closed‐canopy Afrotemperate Forest patches (“Forest”) within fire‐prone open‐canopy Fynbos in the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) on sandstone‐derived soils. We evaluated the hypothesis that although fire and local topography and hydrology likely determined the paleogeographic boundaries of Forest, present‐day boundaries are additionally imposed by emergent...

Data from: The perceptual and chemical basis of egg discrimination in communally nesting Greater Anis (Crotophaga major)

Mark E. Hauber, Miri Dainson, Daniel T. Baldassarre, Marouf Hossain, Mande Holford & Christina Riehl
The eggshells of communally breeding Greater Anis (Crotophaga major) consist of a blue-green pigmented calcite matrix overlaid by a chalky white layer of vaterite, both of which are polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The white vaterite layer is intact in freshly laid eggs and may function in protecting the eggs from mechanical damage, but it also abrades during incubation to reveal the blue calcite shell underneath. Previous research has shown that this color change serves a...

Data from: A maladaptive combination of traits contributes to the maintenance of a Drosophila hybrid zone

Brandon S. Cooper, Alisa Sedghifar, W. Thurston Nash, Aaron A. Comeault & Daniel R. Matute
Drosophila teissieri and D. yakuba diverged approximately 3 mya and are thought to share a large, ancestral, African range [1, 2, 3]. These species now co-occur in parts of continental Africa and in west Africa on the island of Bioko [1, 4]. While D. yakuba is a human commensal, D. teissieri seems to be associated with Parinari fruits, restricting its range to forests [4, 5, 6]. Genome data indicate introgression, despite no evidence of contemporary...

Data from: Interbirth intervals in wild baboons: environmental predictors and hormonal correlates

Laurence R. Gesquiere, Jeanne Altmann, Elizabeth A. Archie & Susan C. Alberts
Objectives: Interbirth intervals (IBIs) are a key metric of female reproductive success; understanding how they are regulated by environmental, social, and demographic factors can provide insight into sources of variance in female fitness. Materials and Methods: Using 36 years of reproductive data on 490 IBIs for 160 wild female baboons, we identified sources of variance in the duration of IBIs and of their component phases: postpartum amenorrhea (PPA), sexual cycling, and pregnancy. We also examined...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    41

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33
  • Text
    8

Affiliations

  • Princeton University
    40
  • Duke University
    4
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    3
  • University of British Columbia
    3
  • University of California Los Angeles
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    2
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Michigan Department of Natural Resources
    2