55 Works

Biodiversity data from: The mass extinction debt of the Anthropocene

Christopher Spalding & Pincelli Hull
To make sense of our present biodiversity crises, the modern rate of species extinctions is commonly compared to a benchmark, or “background,” rate derived from the fossil record. These estimates are critical for bounding the scale of modern diversity loss, but have yet to account for the fundamental structure of extinction rates through time. Namely, a substantial fraction of extinctions within the fossil record occur within relatively short-lived extinction pulses, and not during intervals characterized...

Large herbivores transform plant-pollinator networks in an African savanna

Matthew C. Hutchinson, Travis J. Guy, Todd M. Palmer, Robert M. Pringle, Katherine C. R. Baldock, Elisha Kayser, Benjamin Baiser, Phillip P. A. Staniczenko, Jacob R. Goheen, Robert M. Pringle & Todd M. Palmer
Pollination by animals is a key ecosystem service1,2 and interactions between plants and their pollinators are a model system for the study of ecological networks3,4, yet plant-pollinator networks are typically studied in isolation from the broader ecosystems in which they are embedded. The plants visited by pollinators also interact with other consumer guilds that eat stems, leaves, fruits, or seeds. One such guild, large mammalian herbivores, are well-known ecosystem engineers5–7 and may have substantial impacts...

Human-associated microbiota suppress invading bacteria even under disruption by antibiotics

Andrew Letten, Michael Baumgartner, Katia Pfrunder-Cardozo, Jonathan Levine & Alex Hall
In light of their adverse impacts on resident microbial communities, it is widely predicted that broad-spectrum antibiotics can promote the spread of resistance by releasing resistant strains from competition with other strains and species. We investigated the competitive suppression of a resistant strain of Escherichia coli inoculated into human-associated communities in the presence and absence of the broad and narrow spectrum antibiotics rifampicin and polymyxin B, respectively. We found strong evidence of community-level suppression of...

Numbers of individuals and endemicity for birds in three study sites of the Himalayas-Hengduan mountains of China

Yiming Hu, Brett Scheffers, Xinyuan Pan, Huijian Hu, Zhixin Zhou, Dan Liang, Cheng Wenda, Zhixin Wen & Luke Gibson
1. Describing the patterns and revealing the underlying mechanisms responsible for variations in community structure remains a central focus in ecology. However, important gaps remain, including our understanding of species abundance. Most studies on abundance-based relationships are from either temperate ecosystems or tropical ecosystems, and few have explicitly tested abundance-based relationships across a temperate to tropical ecotone. 2. Here, we use a comprehensive dataset of breeding birds across elevation spanning a temperate to subtropical gradient...

Data from: Predicting range shifts of pikas (Mammalia, Ochotonidae) in China under scenarios incorporating land-use change, climate change, and dispersal limitations

Liang Ma, Chunrong Mi, Jiapeng Qu, Deyan Ge, Qisen Yang & David Wilcove
Two of the most important forces affecting biodiversity are land-use change (LUC) and global climate change (GCC). Previous studies have modeled their impacts on species separately and together, but few have done so for multiple species with dispersal limitations incorporated into the models. We integrate species distribution models plus a dispersal model to predict LUC and GCC impacts on the ranges of five species of pikas in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau region of China. Pikas are...

Rapid evolution of life history traits in response to warming, predation and competition: a meta-analysis

Tess Grainger & Jonathan Levine
Although studies quantifying evolutionary change in response to the selective pressures that organisms face in the wild have demonstrated that organisms can evolve rapidly, we lack a systematic assessment of the frequency, magnitude and direction of rapid evolutionary change across taxa. To address this gap, we conducted a meta-analysis of 58 studies that document the effects of warming, predation or competition on the evolution of body size, development rate or fecundity in natural or experimental...

Data and code from: Evolution of brilliant iridescent feather nanostructures

Klara Nordén, Chad Eliason & Mary Caswell Stoddard
The brilliant iridescent plumage of birds creates some of the most stunning color displays known in the natural world. Iridescent plumage colors are produced by nanostructures in feathers and have evolved in a wide variety of birds. The building blocks of these structures—melanosomes (melanin-filled organelles)—come in a variety of forms, yet how these different forms contribute to color production across birds remains unclear. Here, we leverage evolutionary analyses, optical simulations and reflectance spectrophotometry to uncover...

Shakespeare and Company Project Dataset: Lending Library Books

Joshua Kotin, Rebecca Sutton Koeser, Carl Adair, Serena Alagappan, Paige Allen, Jean Bauer, Oliver J. Browne, Nick Budak, Harriet Calver, Jin Yun Chow, Ian Davis, Gissoo Doroudian, Currie Engel, Violet Gautreua, Alex Gjaja, Elspeth Green, Isaac Hart, Benjamin Hicks, Madeleine E. Joelson, Carolyn Kelly, Sara Krolewski, Xinyi Li, Ellie Maag, Elizabeth Macksey, Cate Mahoney … & Clifford E. Wulfman
This dataset includes information about approximately 6,000 books and other items with bibliographic data as well as summary information about when the item circulated in the Shakespeare and Company lending library and the number of times an item was borrowed or purchased.

Shakespeare and Company Project Dataset: Lending Library Members, Books, Events

Joshua Kotin, Rebecca Sutton Koeser, Carl Adair, Serena Alagappan, Paige Allen, Jean Bauer, Oliver J. Browne, Nick Budak, Harriet Calver, Jin Yun Chow, Ian Davis, Gissoo Doroudian, Currie Engel, Violet Gautreua, Alex Gjaja, Elspeth Green, Isaac Hart, Benjamin Hicks, Madeleine E. Joelson, Carolyn Kelly, Sara Krolewski, Xinyi Li, Ellie Maag, Elizabeth Macksey, Cate Mahoney … & Clifford E. Wulfman
The Shakespeare and Company Project makes three datasets available to download in CSV and JSON formats. The datasets provide information about lending library members; the books that circulated in the lending library; and lending library events, including borrows, purchases, memberships, and renewals. The datasets may be used individually or in combination site URLs are consistent identifiers across all three. The DOIs for each dataset are as follows: Members (https://doi.org/10.34770/nsa4-3t76); Books (https://doi.org/10.34770/079z-h206); Events (https://doi.org/10.34770/rtbp-kv40).

Dietary abundance distributions: Dominance and diversity in vertebrate diets

Matthew C. Hutchinson, Andrew P. Dobson & Robert M. Pringle
Diet composition is among the most important yet least understood dimensions of animal ecology. Inspired by the study of species-abundance distributions (SADs), we tested for generalities in the structure of vertebrate diets by characterizing them as dietary-abundance distributions (DADs). We compiled data on 1167 population-level diets, representing >500 species from 6 vertebrate classes, spanning all continents and oceans. DADs near-universally (92.5%) followed a hollow-curve shape, with scant support for other plausible rank-abundance-distribution shapes. This strong...

Seasonal strategies differ between tropical and extratropical herbivores

Joel Abraham, Gareth Hempson, Tyler Faith & Carla Staver
Seasonal diet shifts and migration are key components of large herbivore population dynamics, but we lack a systematic understanding of how these behaviors are distributed on a macroecological scale. The prevalence of seasonal strategies is likely related to herbivore body size and feeding guild, and may also be influenced by properties of the environment, such as soil nutrient availability and climate seasonality. We evaluated the distribution of seasonal dietary shifts and migration across large-bodied mammalian...

Data for: 'Facies control on carbonate δ13C on the Great Bahama Bank'

Emily Geyman & Adam Maloof
The carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition of shallow-water carbonates often is interpreted to reflect the δ13C of the global ocean and is used as a proxy for changes in the global carbon cycle. However, local platform processes, in addition to meteoric and marine diagenesis, may decouple carbonate δ13C from that of the global ocean. To shed light on the extent to which changing sediment grain composition may produce δ13C shifts in the stratigraphic record, we present...

Delivery Gig Worker Interviews on Automation at Work

Diana Enriquez
These data include 39 structured interview transcripts. Each case is someone who worked at the time for Uber, UberEats, Lyft, and/or Amazon Flex (Amazon’s contractor delivery service). These data were collected between July and September 2019. All but one of the interviews occurred over the phone. My questions are focused on the structure of their gig work jobs and the technology they used at work or expected to use at work in the future. I...

Derrida's Margins datasets

Katie Chenoweth, Rebecca Koeser, Renée Altergott, Alexander Baron-Raiffe, Jean Bauer, Nicholas Budak, Chad Cordova, Austin Hancock, Benjamin Hicks, Kevin McElwee & Chloé Vettier
Derrida’s Margins is a website and online research tool for annotations from the Library of Jacques Derrida, housed at Princeton University Library (PUL) . Jacques Derrida is one of the major figures of twentieth-century thought, and his library--which bears the traces of decades of close reading--represents a major intellectual archive. This project focused on annotations related to Derrida’s landmark 1967 work De la grammatologie (Of Grammatology).

Data set for \"Role of contamination in optimal droplet production by collective bubble bursting\"

Luc Deike
Data set for Role of contamination in optimal droplet production by collective bubble bursting.

Data for: 'How is sea level change encoded in carbonate stratigraphy?'

Emily Geyman, Adam Maloof & Blake Dyer
The history of organismal evolution, seawater chemistry, and paleoclimate is recorded in layers of carbonate sedimentary rock. Meter-scale cyclic stacking patterns in these carbonates often are interpreted as representing sea level change. A reliable sedimentary proxy for eustasy would be profoundly useful for reconstructing paleoclimate, since sea level responds to changes in temperature and ice volume. However, the translation from water depth to carbonate layering has proven difficult, with recent surveys of modern shallow water...

Why is El Nino warm?

Allison Hogikyan, Laure Resplandy, Wenchang Yang & Stephan Fueglistaler
Dataset constructed from GFDL-FLOR preindustrial control experiment run by Wenchang Yang (wenchang@princeton.edu) on Princeton University's tiger CPU. Processing by Allison Hogikyan (hogikyan@princeton.edu) on Princeton University's tigress data processing node. June 2021.

Data from: Host population dynamics in the face of an evolving pathogen

Wesley Hochachka, Andrew Dobson, Dana Hawley & André Dhondt
1. Interactions between hosts and pathogens are dynamic at both ecological and evolutionary levels. In the resultant “eco-evolutionary dynamics” ecological and evolutionary processes affect each other. For example, the house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) and its recently-emerged pathogen, the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum, form a system in which evidence suggests that changes in bacterial virulence through time enhance levels of host immunity in ways that drive the evolution of virulence in an arms race. 2. We use...

Dynamic plant-soil microbe interactions: the neglected effect of soil conditioning time

Po-Ju Ke, Peter Zee & Tadashi Fukami
Plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) may change in strength over the life of plant individuals as plants continue to modify the soil microbial community. However, the temporal variation in PSF is rarely quantified and its impacts on plant communities remain unknown. Using a chronosequence reconstructed from annual aerial photos of a coastal dune ecosystem, we characterized >20-year changes in soil microbial communities associated with individuals of the four dominant perennial species, one legume and three non-legume. We...

De novo genome assembly of Leptodactylus fuscus

Lu Yang, Peter Andolfatto, Andrew Crawford, Santiago Herrera-Álvarez, Maríadel Pilar Rodríguez-Ordoñez, Julie Peng, Shabnam Mohammadi, Jay Storz, Arbel Harpak & Susanne Dobler
This presents a de novo genome assembly of Leptodactylus fuscus. High molecular weight DNA was extracted from a L. fuscus embryo which had been preserved in ethanol upon collection in Garzón, Huila, Colombia. The library was prepared and sequenced with 10X Genomics Chromium. Linked reads were processed by Long Ranger basic v2.2.2 and assembled with Supernova v2.1.1. The assembled genome is 2.42 Gb with 16,530 scaffolds >=10 kb, and scaffold N50 = 363 kb. The...

Glucocorticoid exposure predicts survival in female baboons

Fernando Campos, Elizabeth Archie, Laurence Gesquiere, Jenny Tung, Jeanne Altmann & Susan Alberts
Are differences in HPA axis activation across the adult lifespan linked to differences in survival? This question has been the subject of considerable debate. We analyze the link between survival and fecal glucocorticoid (GC) measures in a wild primate population, leveraging an unusually extensive longitudinal dataset of 14,173 GC measurements from 242 adult female baboons over 1,634 female-years. We document a powerful link between GCs and survival: females with relatively high current GCs or high...

Large herbivores suppress liana infestation in an African savanna

Tyler C. Coverdale, Ryan D. O'Connell, Matthew C. Hutchinson, Amanda Savagian, Tyler R. Kartzinel, Todd M. Palmer, Jacob R. Goheen, David J. Augustine, Mahesh Sankaran, Corina E. Tarnita & Robert M. Pringle
African savannas are the last stronghold of diverse large-mammal communities, and a major focus of savanna ecology is to understand how these animals affect the relative abundance of trees and grasses. However, savannas support diverse plant life-forms, and human-induced changes in large-herbivore assemblages—declining wildlife populations and their displacement by livestock—may cause unexpected shifts in plant community composition. We investigated how herbivory affects the prevalence of lianas (woody vines) and their impact on trees in an...

Data for: The El Nino-Southern Oscillation dramatically reduces the frequency of reproduction and reproductive rate of a tropical forest bird

Christina Riehl
Although climate change has been implicated in population declines of tropical forest birds, there is a critical lack of data on the mechanisms underlying these declines. Attempts to link climatic factors to variation in adult survival, fecundity, or nest success have been largely inconclusive. Recent community-scale analyses have suggested that tropical birds may be less likely to breed under adverse conditions, but long-term data on individual reproduction are needed to test this hypothesis. Here we...

Data from: Concerted evolution reveals co-adapted amino acid substitutions in Na+K+ ATPase of frogs that prey on toxic toads

Shabnam Mohammadi, Lu Yang, Arbel Harpak, Santiago Herrera-Álvarez, María Del Pilar Rodríguez-Ordoñez, Julie Peng, Karen Zhang, Jay Storz, Susanne Dobler, Andrew Crawford & Peter Andolfatto
Gene duplication is an important source of evolutionary innovation, but the functional distinction between duplicates can be opposed by ongoing gene conversion between them. Here we document a tandem duplication of Na+,K+-ATPase subunit α1 (ATP1A1) sharedby frogs in the genus Leptodactylus,a group of species that feeds on toxic toads. One ATP1A1 paralog evolved resistance to toad toxins while the other paralog retained ancestral susceptibility. Frequent non-allelic gene conversion homogenized most of the paralog sequences,yet the...

High social status males experience accelerated epigenetic aging in wild baboons

Jordan Anderson, Rachel Johnston, Amanda Lea, Fernando Campos, Tawni Voyles, Mercy Akinyi, Susan Alberts, Elizabeth Archie & Jenny Tung
Aging, for virtually all life, is inescapable. However, within populations, biological aging rates vary. Understanding sources of variation in this process is central to understanding the biodemography of natural populations. We constructed a DNA methylation-based age predictor for an intensively studied wild baboon population in Kenya. Consistent with findings in humans, the resulting “epigenetic clock” closely tracks chronological age, but individuals are predicted to be somewhat older or younger than their known ages. Surprisingly, these...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Princeton University
    55
  • University of Florida
    5
  • Duke University
    4
  • University of Wyoming
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  • University of Pennsylvania
    3
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    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    2
  • Universität Hamburg
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