46 Works

Data from: Floral resource availability from groundcover promotes bee abundance in coffee agroecosystems

Kaleigh Fisher, David J. Gonthier, Katherine K. Ennis & Ivette Perfecto
Patterns of bee abundance and diversity across different spatial scales have received thorough research consideration. However, the impact of short and long term temporal resource availability on biodiversity has been less explored. This is highly relevant in tropical agricultural systems for pollinators, as many foraging periods of pollinators extend beyond flowering of any single crop species. In this study, we sought to understand how bee communities in tropical agroecosystems changed between seasons, and if short...

Data from: Bringing ecology blogging into the scientific fold: measuring reach and impact of science community blogs

Manu E. Saunders, Meghan A. Duffy, Stephen B. Heard, Margaret Kosmala, Simon R. Leather, Terrence P. McGlynn, Jeff Ollerton & Amy L. Parachnowitsch
The popularity of science blogging has increased in recent years, but the number of academic scientists who maintain regular blogs is limited. The role and impact of science communication blogs aimed at general audiences is often discussed, but the value of science community blogs aimed at the academic community has largely been overlooked. Here, we focus on our own experiences as bloggers to argue that science community blogs are valuable to the academic community. We...

Data from: Quantifying the similarity between genes and geography across Alaska's alpine small mammals

L. Lacey Knowles, Rob Massatti, Qixin He, Link E. Olson & Hayley C. Lanier
Aim: Quantitatively evaluate the similarity of genomic variation and geography in five different alpine small mammals in Alaska, and use this quantitative assessment of concordance as a framework for refining hypotheses about the processes structuring population genetic variation in either a species-specific or shared manner. Location: Alaska and adjacent north-western Canada. Methods: For each taxon we generated 3500–7500 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and applied a Procrustes analysis to find an optimal transformation that maximizes the similarity between...

Data from: Distributional shifts – not geographic isolation – as a probable driver of montane species divergence

L. Lacey Knowles, Robert Massatti & Rob Massatti
As biodiversity hotspots, montane regions have been a focus of research to understand the divergence process. Like their oceanic counterparts, the diversity of the “sky islands” might be ascribed to geographic isolation of mountaintops. However, because the sky islands, and especially those in northern latitudes, are subject to extreme climatic events such as the glacial cycles that drove both altitudinal and geographical shifts in species’ distributions, the dynamic colonization process is also a possible factor...

Data from: Making it last: storage time and temperature have differential impacts on metabolite profiles of airway samples from cystic fibrosis patients

Stephen Wandro, Lisa Carmody, Tara Gallagher, John J. LiPuma & Katrine Whiteson
Metabolites of human or microbial origin have the potential to be important biomarkers of disease state in cystic fibrosis (CF). Clinical sample collection and storage conditions may impact metabolite abundances with clinical relevance. We measured the change in metabolite composition based on untargeted gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) when CF sputum samples were stored at either 4°C, -20°C, or -80°C with one or two freeze-thaw cycles. Daily time points were taken for one week and...

Data from: Is BAMM flawed? Theoretical and practical concerns in the analysis of multi-rate diversification models

Daniel L. Rabosky, Jonathan S. Mitchell & Jonathan Chang
BAMM (Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixtures) is a statistical framework that uses reversible jump MCMC to infer complex macroevolutionary dynamics of diversification and phenotypic evolution on phylogenetic trees. A recent article by Moore and coauthors (MEA) reported a number of theoretical and practical concerns with BAMM. Major claims from MEA are that (1) BAMM's likelihood function is incorrect, because it does not account for unobserved rate shifts; (2) the posterior distribution on the number of...

Data from: Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

Mary E. Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Heidi Eager, Laurent Frantz, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Verena J. Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Richard M. Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark C. Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright … & Mark Horton
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological...

Data from: FiSSE: A simple non-parametric test for the effects of a binary character on lineage diversification rates

Daniel L. Rabosky & Emma E. Goldberg
It is widely assumed that phenotypic traits can influence rates of speciation and extinction, and several statistical approaches have been used to test for correlations between character states and lineage diversification. Recent work suggests that model-based tests of state-dependent speciation and extinction are sensitive to model inadequacy and phylogenetic pseudoreplication. We describe a simple non-parametric statistical test ("FiSSE") to assess the effects of a binary character on lineage diversification rates. The method involves computing a...

Data from: Wide but not impermeable: Testing the riverine barrier hypothesis for an Amazonian plant species

Alison G. Nazareno, Christopher W. Dick & Lucia G. Lohmann
Wallace's riverine barrier hypothesis postulates that large rivers, such as the Amazon and its tributaries, reduce or prevent gene flow between populations on opposite banks, leading to allopatry and areas of species endemism occupying interfluvial regions. Several studies have shown that two major tributaries, Rio Branco and Rio Negro, are important barriers to gene flow for birds, amphibians and primates. No botanical studies have considered the potential role of the Rio Branco as a barrier,...

Data from: Genetic diversity is largely unpredictable but scales with museum occurrences in a species-rich clade of Australian lizards

Sonal Singhal, Huateng Huang, Pascal O. Title, Stephen C. Donnellan, Iris Holmes & Daniel L. Rabosky
Genetic diversity is a fundamental characteristic of species and is affected by many factors, including mutation rate, population size, life history and demography. To better understand the processes that influence levels of genetic diversity across taxa, we collected genome-wide restriction-associated DNA data from more than 500 individuals spanning 76 nominal species of Australian scincid lizards in the genus Ctenotus. To avoid potential biases associated with variation in taxonomic practice across the group, we used coalescent-based...

Data from: History cleans up messes: the impact of time in driving divergence and introgression in a tropical suture zone

Sonal Singhal & Ke Bi
Contact zones provide an excellent arena in which to address questions about how genomic divergence evolves during lineage divergence. They allow us to both infer patterns of genomic divergence in allopatric populations isolated from introgression and to characterize patterns of introgression after lineages meet. Thusly motivated, we analyze genome-wide introgression data from four contact zones in three genera of lizards endemic to the Australian Wet Tropics. These contact zones all formed between morphologically cryptic lineage-pairs...

Data from: Stream nitrogen concentration, but not plant N-fixing capacity, modulates litter diversity effects on decomposition

Alan M. Tonin, Luz Boyero, Silvia Monroy, Ana Basaguren, Javier Perez, Richard G. Pearson, Bradley J. Cardinale, & Jesus Pozo
1. We are facing major biodiversity loss and there is evidence that such loss can alter ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of plant diversity on decomposition – a key component of the global carbon cycle – are still unclear. A recent study suggested that a plant trait – their nitrogen (N)-fixing capacity – could mediate effects of litter diversity on decomposition by means of a microbial transfer of N from N-fixers to non-fixers. 2. We...

Data from: Spinosity, regeneration, and targeting among Paleozoic crinoids and their predators

Valerie J.P. Syverson, Carlton E. Brett, Forest J. Gahn & Tomasz K. Baumiller
Evolving interactions between predators and prey constitute one of the major adaptive influences on marine animals during the Paleozoic. Crinoids and fish constitute a predator-prey system that may date back to at least the Silurian, as suggested by patterns of crinoid regeneration and spinosity in concert with changes in the predatory fauna. Here we present data on the frequency of breakage and regeneration in the spines of the Middle Devonian camerate Gennaeocrinus and Late Paleozoic...

Data from: A nutrient mediates intraspecific competition between rodent malaria parasites in vivo

Nina Wale, Derek G. Sim & Andrew F. Read
Hosts are often infected with multiple strains of a single parasite species. Within-host competition between parasite strains can be intense and has implications for the evolution of traits that impact patient health, such as drug resistance and virulence. Yet the mechanistic basis of within-host competition is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that a parasite nutrient, para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA), mediates competition between a drug resistant and drug susceptible strain of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi. We...

Data from: Not all weeds are created equal: a database approach uncovers differences in the sexual system of native and introduced weeds

Megan L. Van Etten, Jeffrey K. Conner, Shu-Mei Chang & Regina S. Baucom
Weedy species provide excellent opportunities to examine the process of successful colonization of novel environments. Despite the influence of the sexual system on a variety of processes from reproduction to genetic structure, how the sexual system of species influences weediness has received only limited consideration. We examined the hypothesis that weedy plants have an increased likelihood of being self-compatible compared with nonweedy plants; this hypothesis is derived from Baker's law, which states that species that...

Data from: Suitability of Laurentian Great Lakes for invasive species based on global species distribution models and local habitat

Andrew M. Kramer, Gust Annis, Marion E. Wittmann, William L. Chadderton, Edward S. Rutherford, David M. Lodge, Lacey Mason, Dmitry Beletsky, Catherine Riseng & John M. Drake
Efficient management and prevention of species invasions requires accurate prediction of where species of concern can arrive and persist. Species distribution models provide one way to identify potentially suitable habitat by developing the relationship between climate variables and species occurrence data. However, these models when applied to freshwater invasions are complicated by two factors. The first is that the range expansions that typically occur as part of the invasion process violate standard species distribution model...

Data from: Widespread paleopolyploidy, gene tree conflict, and recalcitrant relationships among the carnivorous Caryophyllales

Joseph F. Walker, Ya Yang, Moore J. Michael, Jessica Mikenas, Alfonso Timoneda, Samuel Frasier Brockington, Stephen Andrew Smith & Michael J. Moore
PREMISE OF STUDY: The carnivorous members of the large, hyperdiverse Caryophyllales (e.g., Venus flytrap, sundews, and Nepenthes pitcher plants) represent perhaps the oldest and most diverse lineage of carnivorous plants. However, despite numerous studies seeking to elucidate their evolutionary relationships, the early-diverging relationships remain unresolved. METHODS: To explore the utility of phylogenomic data sets for resolving relationships among the carnivorous Caryophyllales, we sequenced 10 transcriptomes, including all the carnivorous genera except those in the rare...

Data from: Structure of FlgK reveals the divergence of the bacterial hook-filament junction of Campylobacter

Paula V. Bulieris, Nausad H. Shaikh, Peter L. Freddolino & Fadel A. Samatey
Evolution of a nano-machine consisting of multiple parts, each with a specific function, is a complex process. A change in one part should eventually result in changes in other parts, if the overall function is to be conserved. In bacterial flagella, the filament and the hook have distinct functions and their respective proteins, FliC and FlgE, have different three-dimensional structures. The filament functions as a helical propeller and the hook as a flexible universal joint....

Data from: Divergence of thermal physiological traits in terrestrial breeding frogs along a tropical elevational gradient

Rudolf Von May, Alessandro Catenazzi, Ammon Corl, Roy Santa-Cruz, Ana Carolina Carnaval & Craig Moritz
Critical thermal limits are thought to be correlated with the elevational distribution of species living in tropical montane regions, but with upper limits being relatively invariant compared to lower limits. To test this hypothesis, we examined the variation of thermal physiological traits in a group of terrestrial breeding frogs (Craugastoridae) distributed along a tropical elevational gradient. We measured the critical thermal maximum (CTmax; n = 22 species) and critical thermal minimum (CTmin; n = 14...

Data from: Experimental small-scale flower patches increase species density but not abundance of small urban bees

Maria-Carolina M. Simao, Jill Matthijs & Ivette Perfecto
1. Large flower plantings are often used to combat negative effects of habitat loss on pollinators, but whether these floral additions are effective at smaller scales remains unclear, particularly in urban settings. 2. To test the effectiveness of small-scale floral additions on enhancing urban bee populations, as well as their impact from one year to the next, different quantities of potted sweet alyssum (Lobularia maritima) flowers were placed across sites in Ann Arbor, Michigan for...

Data from: Minimum sample sizes for population genomics: an empirical study from an Amazonian plant species

Alison G. Nazareno, Jordan B. Bemmels, Christopher W. Dick & Lúcia G. Lohmann
High throughput DNA sequencing facilitates the analysis of large portions of the genome in non-model organisms, ensuring high accuracy of population genetic parameters. However, empirical studies evaluating the appropriate sample size for these kinds of studies are still scarce. In this study, we use double digest restriction associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) to recover thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for two physically isolated populations of Amphirrhox longifolia (Violaceae), a non-model plant species for which no...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    46
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • Oberlin College
    3
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Chicago
    2
  • Yale University
    2