3 Works

Data from: The use and utility of surrogates in biodiversity monitoring programmes

Chloe F. Sato, Martin J. Westgate, Philip S. Barton, Claire N. Foster, Luke S. O'Loughlin, Jennifer C. Pierson, Jayne Balmer, Jane Chapman, Gareth Catt, Tanya Detto, Amy Hawcroft, Rodney Kavanagh, Deanna Marshall, Meredith McKay, Katherine Moseby, Mike Perry, Doug Robinson, Mellesa Schroder, Katherine Tuft & David B. Lindenmayer
Monitoring programmes are intended to inform effective biodiversity conservation and management (Legge et al. 2018). Well‐designed programmes can establish baseline conditions, determine trends in threatened species populations, quantify the effects of management, and provide warning of ecosystem changes (Magurran et al. 2010). For these reasons, biodiversity monitoring underpins the activities of land management agencies worldwide. However, it is not always possible to directly monitor key variables at ideal spatio‐temporal resolutions, due to resourcing or logistic...

Data from: Tracing the rise of malignant cell lines: distribution, epidemiology and evolutionary interactions of two transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils

Samantha James, Geordie Jennings, Young Mi Kwon, Maximilian Stammnitz, Alexandra Fraik, Andrew Storfer, Sebastien Comte, David Pemberton, Samantha Fox, Bill Brown, Ruth Pye, Gregory Woods, Bruce Lyons, Paul Hohenlohe, Hamish McCallum, Hannah V. Siddle, Frederic Thomas, Beata Ujvari, Elizabeth P. Murchison, Menna Jones & Rodrigo Hamede
Emerging infectious diseases are rising globally and understanding host-pathogen interactions during the initial stages of disease emergence is essential for assessing potential evolutionary dynamics and designing novel management strategies. Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are endangered due to a transmissible cancer – devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) – that since its emergence in the 1990’s, has affected most populations throughout Tasmania. Recent studies suggest that devils are adapting to the DFTD epidemic and that disease-induced extinction...

Data from: Future climate change is predicted to affect the microbiome and condition of habitat-forming kelp

Zhiguang Qiu, Melinda A Coleman, Euan Provost, Alexandra H Campbell, Brendan P Kelaher, Steven J Dalton, Torsten Thomas, Peter D Steinberg & Ezequiel M Marzinelli
Climate change is driving global declines of marine habitat-forming species through physiological effects and through changes to ecological interactions, with projected trajectories for oceanwarming and acidification likely to exacerbate such impacts in coming decades. Interactions between habitat-formers and their microbiomes are fundamental for host functioning and resilience, but how such relationships will change in future conditions is largely unknown. We investigated independent and interactive effects of warming and acidification on a large brown seaweed, the...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    3
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1
  • Deakin University
    1
  • Griffith University
    1
  • University of Idaho
    1
  • UNSW Sydney
    1