15 Works

Data from: Changes in horn size of Stone's sheep over four decades correlate with trophy hunting pressure

Mathieu Douhard, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Fanie Pelletier, Jean-Michel Gaillard & Christophe Bonenfant
Selective harvest may lead to rapid evolutionary change. For large herbivores, trophy hunting removes males with large horns. That artificial selection, operating in opposition to sexual selection, can lead to undesirable consequences for management and conservation. There have been no comparisons of long-term changes in trophy size under contrasting harvest pressures. We analyzed horn measurements of Stone's rams (Ovis dalli stonei) harvested over 37 years in two large regions of British Columbia, Canada, with marked...

Data from: Resampling method for applying density-dependent habitat selection theory to wildlife surveys

Olivia Tardy, Ariane Massé, Fanie Pelletier & Daniel Fortin
Isodar theory can be used to evaluate fitness consequences of density-dependent habitat selection by animals. A typical habitat isodar is a regression curve plotting competitor densities in two adjacent habitats when individual fitness is equal. Despite the increasing use of habitat isodars, their application remains largely limited to areas composed of pairs of adjacent habitats that are defined a priori. We developed a resampling method that uses data from wildlife surveys to build isodars in...

Data from: Adoption in eastern grey kangaroos: a consequence of misdirected care?

Wendy J. King, David M. Forsyth, Graeme Coulson & Marco Festa-Bianchet
Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently...

Data from: Spatial autocorrelation in fitness affects the estimation of natural selection in the wild

Pascal Marrot, Dany Garant & Anne Charmantier
1. Natural selection is typically estimated in the wild using Lande and Arnold's multiple regression approach. Despite its utility for evolutionary ecologists, this method is subject to the classical assumptions of multiple regressions, which could result in potential analytical problems. In particular, spatial autocorrelation in fitness violates the assumption of residuals independence. Although widespread in the wild, the consequences of this effect have yet to be investigated in the context of Lande and Arnold's regression...

Data from: Anthropogenic and natural drivers of gene flow in a temperate wild fruit tree: a basis for conservation and breeding programs in apples

Amandine Cornille, Alice Feurtey, Uriel Gélin, Jeanne Ropars, Kristine Misvanderbrugge, Pierre Gladieux & Tatiana Giraud
Gene flow is an essential component of population adaptation and species evolution. Understanding of the natural and anthropogenic factors affecting gene flow is also critical for the development of appropriate management, breeding and conservation programs. Here, we explored the natural and anthropogenic factors impacting crop-to-wild and within wild gene flow in apples in Europe using an unprecedented dense sampling of 1,889 wild apple (Malus sylvestris) from European forests and 339 apple cultivars (Malus domestica). We...

Data from: Simple measures of climate, soil properties and plant traits predict national scale grassland soil carbon stocks

Peter Manning, Franciska T. De Vries, Jerry R. B. Tallowin, Roger Smith, Simon R. Mortimer, Emma S. Pilgrim, Kate A. Harrison, Daniel G. Wright, Helen Quirk, Joseph Benson, Bill Shipley, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Jens Kattge, Gerhard Bönisch, Christian Wirth & Richard D. Bardgett
1. Soil carbon (C) storage is a key ecosystem service. Soil C stocks play a vital role in soil fertility and climate regulation, but the factors that control these stocks at regional and national scales are unknown, particularly when their composition and stability are considered. As a result, their mapping relies on either unreliable proxy measures or laborious direct measurements. 2. Using data from an extensive national survey of English grasslands, we show that surface...

Data from: A quantitative genetic approach to assess the evolutionary potential of a coastal marine fish to ocean acidification

Alex J. Malvezzi, Christopher S. Murray, Kevin A. Feldheim, Joseph D. DiBattista, Dany Garant, Christopher J. Gobler, Demian D. Chapman & Hannes Baumann
Assessing the potential of marine organisms to adapt genetically to increasing oceanic CO2 levels requires proxies such as heritability of fitness-related traits under ocean acidification (OA). We applied a quantitative genetic method to derive the first heritability estimate of survival under elevated CO2 conditions in a metazoan. Specifically, we reared offspring, selected from a wild coastal fish population (Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia), at high CO2 conditions (~2,300 μatm) from fertilization to 15 days post hatch,...

Data from: Mother-offspring distances reflect sex differences in fine-scale genetic structure of eastern grey kangaroos

Wendy J. King, Dany Garant & Marco Festa-Bianchet
Natal dispersal affects life history and population biology and causes gene flow. In mammals, dispersal is usually male-biased so that females tend to be philopatric and surrounded by matrilineal kin, which may lead to preferential associations among female kin. Here we combine genetic analyses and behavioral observations to investigate spatial genetic structure and sex-biased dispersal patterns in a high-density population of mammals showing fission–fusion group dynamics. We studied eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) over 2...

Data from: Candidate gene-environment interactions and their relationships with timing of breeding in a wild bird population

Audrey Bourret & Dany Garant
Monitoring and predicting evolutionary changes underlying current environmental modifications are complex challenges. Recent approaches to achieve these objectives include assessing the genetic variation and effects of candidate genes on traits indicating adaptive potential. In birds, for example, short tandem repeat polymorphism at four candidate genes (CLOCK, NPAS2, ADCYAP1, and CREB1) has been linked to variation in phenological traits such as laying date and timing of migration. However, our understanding of their importance as evolutionary predictors...

Data from: A reliable technique to quantify the individual variability of iridescent coloration in birds

Sonia Van Wijk, Marc Bélisle, Dany Garant & Fanie Pelletier
The study of iridescent coloration in birds emerged only recently, mainly due to the difficulty inherent in quantifying its directionality. Directionality restrains color perception to a limited angle and thereby causes drastic changes in brightness when an animal is in motion. Although a versatile goniometer for quantifying iridescent coloration has been developed recently, so far, it has only been applied to measuring the highly directional iridescent coloration in a hummingbird species. Thus, the reliability of...

Data from: The trade-off between clutch size and egg mass in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) is modulated by female body mass

Stéphanie Pellerin, Sébastien Rioux Paquette, Fanie Pelletier, Dany Garant & Marc Bélisle
Egg production is a costly component of reproduction for female birds in terms of energy expenditure and maternal investment. Because resources are typically limited, clutch size and egg mass are expected to be constrained, and this putative trade-off between offspring number and size is at the core of life history theory. Nevertheless, empirical evidence for this trade-off is equivocal at best, as individual heterogeneity in resource acquisition and allocation may hamper the detection of the...

Data from: Multidimensional environmental influences on timing of breeding in a tree swallow population facing climate change

Audrey Bourret, Marc Bélisle, Fanie Pelletier & Dany Garant
Most phenological traits are extremely sensitive to current climate change and advances in the timing of important life-history events have been observed in many species. In birds, phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature is thought to be the main mechanism underlying yearly adjustment in the timing of breeding. However, other factors could be important and interact to affect the levels of plastic responses between and/or within-individuals. Here we use long-term individual-based data on Tree swallow...

Data from: Recasting the dynamic equilibrium model through a functional lens: the interplay of trait-based community assembly and climate

Jessy Loranger, Cyrille Violle, Bill Shipley, Sandra Lavorel, Anne Bonis, Pablo Cruz, Frédérique Louault, Grégory Loucougaray, François Mesléard, Nicole Yavercovski & Éric Garnier
1. According to the dynamic equilibrium hypothesis (DEH), plant species richness is locally controlled by productivity and disturbance. Given that regional conditions widely affect local environmental variables such as soil nutrient availability, the DEH predictions could be improved by considering how climate influences local controls of species richness. Further, a trait-based approach to community assembly has the potential to reveal a deeper, mechanistic understanding of species richness variation across environments. Here we bring together DEH...

Data from: Intraspecific genetic admixture and the morphological diversification of an estuarine fish population complex

Julian J. Dodson, Audrey Bourret, Marie-France Barrette, Julie Turgeon, Gaetan Daigle, Michel Legault, Frédéric Lecomte & Marie France Barrette
The North-east American Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is composed of two glacial races first identified through the spatial distribution of two distinct mtDNA lineages. Contemporary breeding populations of smelt in the St. Lawrence estuary comprise contrasting mixtures of both lineages, suggesting that the two races came into secondary contact in this estuary. The overall objective of this study was to assess the role of intraspecific genetic admixture in the morphological diversification of the estuarine rainbow...

Data from: Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight

Heather M. Kharouba & Mark Vellend
1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    15

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    15

Affiliations

  • Université de Sherbrooke
    15
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Université Laval
    2
  • Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs
    2
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • University of Newcastle Australia
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1