15 Works

Data from: Species traits as drivers of food web structure

Idaline Laigle, Isabelle Aubin, Christoph Digel, Ulrich Brose, Isabelle Boulangeat & Dominique Gravel
The use of functional traits to describe community structure is a promising approach to reveal generalities across organisms and ecosystems. Plant ecologists have demonstrated the importance of traits in explaining community structure, competitive interactions as well as ecosystem functioning. The application of trait-based methods to more complex communities such as food webs is however more challenging owing to the diversity of animal characteristics and of interactions. The objective of this study was to determine how...

Data from: Predicting the genetic impact of stocking in Brook Charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) by combining RAD sequencing and modeling of explanatory variables

Justine Létourneau, Anne-Laure Ferchaud, Jérémy Le Luyer, Martin Laporte, Dany Garant & Louis Bernatchez
In fisheries management, intensive stocking programs are commonly used to enhance population abundance and maintain stock productivity. However, such practices are increasingly raising concerns since multiple studies documented adverse genetic and evolutionary impacts of stocking on wild populations. Improvement of stocking management relies on a better understanding of the dynamic of introgressive hybridization between wild and domestic population and on assessment of the genetic state of wild populations after stocking cessation. In Québec, Canada, over...

Data from: Current spring warming as a driver of selection on reproductive timing in a wild passerine

Pascal Marrot, Anne Charmantier, Jacques Blondel & Dany Garant
1. Evolutionary adaptation as a response to climate change is expected for fitness-related traits affected by climate and exhibiting genetic variance. Although the relationship between warmer spring temperature and earlier timing of reproduction is well documented, quantifications and predictions of the impact of global warming on natural selection acting on phenology in wild populations remain rare. If global warming affects fitness in a similar way across individuals within a population, or if fitness consequences are...

Data from: Long-term fitness consequences of early environment in a long-lived ungulate

Gabriel Pigeon, Marco Festa-Bianchet & Fanie Pelletier
Cohort effects can be a major source of heterogeneity and play an important role in population dynamics. Silver-spoon effects, when environmental quality at birth improves future performance regardless of the adult environment, can induce strong lagged responses on population growth. Alternatively, the external predictive adaptive response (PAR) hypothesis predicts that organisms will adjust their developmental trajectory and physiology during early life in anticipation of expected adult conditions but has rarely been assessed in wild species....

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Data from: Herbivory and pollen limitation at the upper elevational range limit of two forest understory plants of eastern North America

Sébastien Rivest & Mark Vellend
Studies of species’ range limits focus most often on abiotic factors, although the strength of biotic interactions might also vary along environmental gradients and have strong demographic effects. For example, pollinator abundance might decrease at range limits due to harsh environmental conditions, and reduced plant density can reduce attractiveness to pollinators and increase or decrease herbivory. We tested for variation in the strength of pollen limitation and herbivory by ungulates along a gradient leading to...

Data from: Related herbivore species show similar temporal dynamics

F. Guillaume Blanchet, Tomas Roslin, Masahito T. Kimura, Tea Huotari, Riikka Kaartinen, Sofia Gripenberg & Ayco J. M. Tack
1.Within natural communities, different taxa display different dynamics in time. Why this is the case we do not fully know. This thwarts our ability to predict changes in community structure, which is important for both the conservation of rare species in natural communities and for the prediction of pest outbreaks in agriculture. 2.Species sharing phylogeny, natural enemies and/or life history traits have been hypothesized to share similar temporal dynamics. We operationalized these concepts into testing...

Data from: Multiple extreme climatic events strengthen selection for earlier breeding in a wild passerine

Pascal Marrot, Dany Garant & Anne Charmantier
Global climate warming results in an increase in mean temperatures and in the frequency of extreme climatic events (ECEs), which could both strongly impact ecosystems and populations. Most studies assessing the impact of global warming on ecosystems have focused on warming trends while neglecting ECEs. In particular, the effects of multiple ECEs on fitness, and their consequences for selection, are still missing. Here we explored the effects of daily extreme rainfalls, as well as the...

Data from: Direct and indirect effects of early-life environment on lifetime fitness of bighorn ewes

Gabriel Pigeon & Fanie Pelletier
Cohort effects, when a common environment affects long-term performance, can have a major impact on population dynamics. Very few studies of wild animals have obtained the necessary data to study the mechanisms leading to cohort effects. We exploited 42 years of individual-based data on bighorn sheep to test for causal links between birth density, body mass, age at first reproduction, longevity, and lifetime reproductive success using path analysis. Specifically, we investigated whether the effect of...

Data from: Linking innate immunogenetic variation with phenotypic traits in a wild population of tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor

Clarence Schmitt, Dany Garant, Marc Bélisle & Fanie Pelletier
Unravelling the genetic basis of phenotypic variation among individuals is an important step in our understanding of evolution. Recent studies of innate immune genes, such as β -defensins, revealed that these genes had high levels of polymorphism. However, researchers have yet to quantify the effects of such variability on immune responses and fitness-related traits in wild populations. In this study, we assessed how the variability at six avian β -defensin (AvBD) genes was linked to...

Data from: Quantifying individual heterogeneity and its influence on life-history trajectories: different methods for different questions and contexts

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Mathieu Douhard, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Fanie Pelletier & Nigel G. Yoccoz
Heterogeneity among individuals influences the life-history trajectories we observe at the population level because viability selection, selective immigration and emigration processes, and ontogeny change the proportion of individuals with specific trait values with increasing age. Here, we review the two main approaches that have been proposed to account for these processes in life-history trajectories, contrasting how they quantify ontogeny and selection, and proposing ways to overcome some of their limitations. Nearly all existing approaches to...

Data from: Sociodemographic factors modulate the spatial response of brown bears to vacancies created by hunting

Shane C. Frank, Martin Leclerc, Fanie Pelletier, Frank Rosell, Jon E. Swenson, Richard Bischof, Jonas Kindberg, Hans Geir Eiken, Snorre B. Hagen, Andreas Zedrosser & Jon. E. Swenson
1.There is a growing recognition of the importance of indirect effects from hunting on wildlife populations, e.g., social and behavioral changes due to harvest, which occur after the initial offtake. Nonetheless, little is known about how the removal of members of a population influences the spatial configuration of the survivors. 2.We studied how surviving brown bears (Ursus arctos) used former home ranges that had belonged to casualties of the annual bear hunting season in southcentral...

Data from: Conserved G-matrices of morphological and life-history traits among continental and island blue tit populations

Boris Delahaie, Anne Charmantier, Stéphane Chantepie, Dany Garant, Melody Porlier & Céline Teplitsky
The genetic variance–covariance matrix (G-matrix) summarizes the genetic architecture of multiple traits. It has a central role in the understanding of phenotypic divergence and the quantification of the evolutionary potential of populations. Laboratory experiments have shown that G-matrices can vary rapidly under divergent selective pressures. However, because of the demanding nature of G-matrix estimation and comparison in wild populations, the extent of its spatial variability remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigate spatial variation...

Data from: Trait-matching and phylogeny as predictors of predator-prey interactions involving ground beetles

Pierre-Marc Brousseau, Dominique Gravel & I. Tanya Handa
With global change modifying species assemblages, our success in predicting ecosystem level consequences of these new communities will depend, in part, on our ability to understand biotic interactions. Current food web theory considers interactions between numerous species simultaneously, but descriptive models are unable to predict interactions between newly co-occurring species. Incorporating proxies such as functional traits and phylogeny into models could help infer predator/ prey interactions. Here we used trait-matching between predator feeding traits and...

Data from: Signaler and receiver boldness influence response to alarm calls in eastern chipmunks

Charline Couchoux, Jeanne Clermont, Dany Garant & Denis Reale
Using social information can benefit individuals in many ways. Responding to alarm signals can, for instance, maximize survival under predation risk. However, foraging individuals should consider the reliability of such risk-based information to balance anti-predator behavior and resource acquisition. Receiver decisions could depend on personality effects, as individual variation in risk-taking tendencies (i.e. boldness) could not only affect receiver perception of the signaled threat but also signaler reliability. Recent theoretical models support the possibility of...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    15

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    15

Affiliations

  • Université de Sherbrooke
    15
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    2
  • Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
    1
  • University of Quebec at Montreal
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • Charles Sturt University
    1