29 Works

Data from: Remarkably divergent regions punctuate the genome assembly of the Caenorhabditis elegans Hawaiian strain CB4856

Owen A. Thompson, L. Basten Snoek, Harm Nijveen, Mark G. Sterken, Rita J. M. Volkers, Rachel Brenchley, Arjen Van't Hof, Roel P. J. Bevers, Andrew R. Cossins, Itai Yanai, Alex Hajnal, Tobias Schmid, Jaryn D. Perkins, David Spencer, Leonid Kruglyak, Erik C. Andersen, Donald G. Moerman, LaDeana W. Hillier, Jan E. Kammenga & Robert H. Waterston
The Hawaiian strain (CB4856) of Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most divergent from the canonical laboratory strain N2 and has been widely used in developmental, population and evolutionary studies. To enhance the utility of the strain, we have generated a draft sequence of the CB4856 genome, exploiting a variety of resources and strategies. The CB4856 genome when compared against the N2 reference has 327,050 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 79,529 insertion-deletion events (indels) that...

Data from: Restored tallgrass prairies have reduced phylogenetic diversity compared with remnants

Rebecca S. Barak, Evelyn W. Williams, Andrew L. Hipp, Marlin L. Bowles, Gabriela M. Carr, Robert Sherman & Daniel J. Larkin
Ecological restoration is critical for mitigating habitat loss and providing ecosystem services. However, restorations often have lower diversity than remnant, reference sites. Phylogenetic diversity is an important component of biodiversity and ecosystem function that has only recently been used to evaluate restoration outcomes. To move towards prediction in the restoration of biodiversity, it is necessary to understand how phylogenetic diversity of restorations compares with that of reference sites, and where deficits are found, to evaluate...

Data from: Phylogenetic measures of plant communities show long-term change and impacts of fire management in tallgrass prairie remnants

Daniel J. Larkin, Andrew L. Hipp, Jens Kattge, William Prescott, Rebecca K. Tonietto, Sarah K. Jacobi & Marlin L. Bowles
1. Phylogenies are increasingly incorporated into ecological studies on the basis that evolutionary relatedness broadly correlates with trait similarity. However, phylogenetic approaches have rarely been applied to monitoring long-term community change or guiding management. 2. We analysed a 25-year resampling data set (1976–2001) of 41 tallgrass prairie remnants (Illinois, USA) to test for phylogenetic signals of plant community structure, change, environmental associations, fire management and functional traits. A community phylogeny was constructed using GenBank sequences...

Data from: A transcriptome screen for positive selection in domesticated breadfruit and its wild relatives (Artocarpus spp.)

Kristen M. Laricchia, Matthew G. Johnson, Diane Ragone, Evelyn W. Williams, Nyree J.C. Zerega, Norman J. Wickett & Nyree J. C. Zerega
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Underutilized crops, such as breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae) have the potential to improve global food security. Humans have artificially selected many cultivars of breadfruit since its domestication began approximately 3,500 years ago. The goal of this research is to identify transcriptomic signals of positive selection and to develop genomic resources that may facilitate the development of improved breadfruit cultivars in the future. METHODS: A reference transcriptome of breadfruit was assembled de...

Data from: The statistical mechanics of human weight change

John C. Lang, Hans De Sterck & Daniel M. Abrams
Over the past 35 years there has been a near doubling in the worldwide prevalence of obesity. Body Mass Index (BMI) distributions in high-income societies have increasingly shifted rightwards, corresponding to increases in average BMI that are due to well-studied changes in the socioeconomic environment. However, in addition to this shift, BMI distributions have also shown marked changes in their particular shape over time, exhibiting an ongoing right-skewed broadening that is not well understood. Here,...

Data from: Structural and mechanistic basis of zinc regulation across the E. coli Zur regulon

Benjamin A. Gilston, Suning Wang, Mason D. Marcus, Mónica A. Canalizo-Hernández, Elden P. Swindell, Yi Xue, Alfonso Mondragón & Thomas V. O'Halloran
Commensal microbes, whether they are beneficial or pathogenic, are sensitive to host processes that starve or swamp the prokaryote with large fluctuations in local zinc concentration. To understand how microorganisms coordinate a dynamic response to changes in zinc availability at the molecular level, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of the zinc-sensing zinc uptake regulator (Zur) protein at each of the known Zur-regulated genes in Escherichia coli. We solved the structure of zinc-loaded Zur bound to...

Data from: Systemic thyroid hormone status during levothyroxine therapy in hypothyroidism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Elizabeth A. McAninch, Kumar B. Rajan, Corinne H. Miller & Antonio C. Bianco
CONTEXT: The standard of care for overt hypothyroidism is levothyroxine at doses that normalize serum TSH levels. Whether this approach universally restores thyroid hormone signaling is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To review studies of overt hypothyroidism in which participants were treated with levothyroxine to normalize serum TSH levels and measured other objective markers of thyroid hormone signaling. DESIGN: Databases were searched for studies that reported objective markers of thyroid hormone signaling (serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol...

Data from: Mutation is a sufficient and robust predictor of genetic variation for mitotic spindle traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

Reza Farhadifar, Jose Miguel Ponciano, Erik C. Andersen, Daniel J. Needleman & Charles F. Baer
Different types of phenotypic traits consistently exhibit different levels of genetic variation in natural populations. There are two potential explanations: either mutation produces genetic variation at different rates, or natural selection removes or promotes genetic variation at different rates. Whether mutation or selection is of greater general importance is a longstanding unresolved question in evolutionary genetics. We report mutational variances (VM) for 19 traits related to the first mitotic cell division in C. elegans, and...

Data from: Drought and immunity determine the intensity of West Nile virus epidemics and climate change impacts

Sara H. Paull, Daniel E. Horton, Moetasim Ashfaq, Deeksha Rastogi, Laura D. Kramer, Noah S. Diffenbaugh & A. Marm Kilpatrick
The effect of global climate change on infectious disease remains hotly debated because multiple extrinsic and intrinsic drivers interact to influence transmission dynamics in nonlinear ways. The dominant drivers of widespread pathogens, like West Nile virus, can be challenging to identify due to regional variability in vector and host ecology, with past studies producing disparate findings. Here, we used analyses at national and state scales to examine a suite of climatic and intrinsic drivers of...

Data from: Absolute axial growth and trunk segmentation in the early Cambrian trilobite Oryctocarella duyunensis

Tao Dia, Nigel Hughes, Xingliang Zhang, Giuseppe Fusco & Nigel Hughes
A short stratigraphic interval near Bulin in western Hunan (China) yields multiple specimens of the ~514 Ma old oryctocarine trilobite Oryctocarella duyunensis. Size data obtained from these specimens indicates that, from meraspid degree 1 onwards, degrees represent successive instars. Meraspid growth persisted until a terminal stage was reached, providing the first example of determinate growth in trilobites and, notably, in an early Cambrian species. The sample contains three varieties of such terminal stages, recognized as...

Data from: Impact on offspring methylation patterns of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and intrauterine growth restraint suggest common genes and pathways linked to subsequent type 2 diabetes risk

Claire R. Quilter, Wendy N. Cooper, Kerry M. Cliffe, Benjamin M. Skinner, Philippa M. Prentice, LaTasha Nelson, Julien Bauer, Ken K. Ong, Constância Miguel, William L. Lowe, Nabeel A. Affara & David B. Dunger
Size at birth, postnatal weight gain, and adult risk for type 2 diabetes may reflect environmental exposures during developmental plasticity and may be mediated by epigenetics. Both low birth weight (BW), as a marker of fetal growth restraint, and high birth weight (BW), especially after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), have been linked to increased risk of adult type 2 diabetes. We assessed DNA methylation patterns using a bead chip in cord blood samples from infants...

Data from: The gravity of pollination: integrating at-site features into spatial analysis of contemporary pollen movement.

Michelle F. DiLeo, Jenna C. Siu, Matthew K. Rhodes, Adriana López-Villalobos, Angela Redwine, Kelly Ksiazek & Rodney J. Dyer
Pollen-mediated gene flow is a major driver of spatial genetic structure in plant populations. Both individual plant characteristics and site-specific features of the landscape can modify the perceived attractiveness of plants to their pollinators and thus play an important role in shaping spatial genetic variation. Most studies of landscape-level genetic connectivity in plants have focused on the effects of inter-individual distance using spatial and increasingly ecological separation; yet have not incorporated individual plant characteristics or...

Data from: Pollinator identity and spatial isolation influence multiple paternity in an annual plant

Matthew K. Rhodes, Jeremie B. Fant & Krissa A. Skogen
The occurrence and extent of multiple paternity is an important component of variation in plant mating dynamics. However, links between pollinator activity and multiple paternity are generally lacking, especially for plant species that attract functionally diverse floral visitors. In this study, we separated the influence of two functionally distinct floral visitors (hawkmoths and solitary bees) and characterized their impacts on multiple paternity in a self-incompatible, annual forb, Oenothera harringtonii (Onagraceae). We also situated pollinator-mediated effects...

Data from: Implicit racial attitudes influence perceived emotional intensity on other-race faces

Qiandong Wang, Guowei Chen, Zhaoquan Wang, Chao S. Hu, Xiaoqing Hu & Genyue Fu
An ability to accurately perceive and evaluate out-group members' emotions plays a critical role in intergroup interactions. Here we showed that Chinese participants' implicit attitudes toward White people bias their perception and judgment of emotional intensity of White people's facial expressions such as anger, fear and sadness. We found that Chinese participants held pro-Chinese/anti-White implicit biases that were assessed in an evaluative implicit association test (IAT). Moreover, their implicit biases positively predicted the perceived intensity...

Data from: Habitat restoration benefits wild bees: a meta-analysis

Rebecca K. Tonietto & Daniel J. Larkin
1.Pollinator conservation is of increasing interest in light of managed honeybee (Apis mellifera) declines, and declines in some species of wild bees. Much work has gone into understanding the effects of habitat enhancements in agricultural systems on wild bee abundance, richness, and pollination services. However, the effects of ecological restoration targeting “natural” ecological endpoints (e.g., restoring former agricultural fields to historic vegetation types or improving degraded natural lands) on wild bees have received relatively little...

Data from: Single‐cell profiling screen identifies microtubule‐dependent reduction of variability in signaling

C. Gustavo Pesce, William J. Peria, Stefan Zdraljevic, Daniel Rockwell, Richard C. Yu, Alejandro Colman-Lerner, Roger Brent, Alan Bush & María Victoria Repetto
Populations of isogenic cells often respond coherently to signals, despite differences in protein abundance and cell state. Previously, we uncovered processes in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone response system (PRS) that reduced cell‐to‐cell variability in signal strength and cellular response. Here, we screened 1,141 non‐essential genes to identify 50 “variability genes”. Most had distinct, separable effects on strength and variability of the PRS, defining these quantities as genetically distinct “axes” of system behavior. Three genes affected...

Data from: Geographic variation in chin shape challenges the universal facial attractiveness hypothesis

Zaneta M. Thayer & Seth D. Dobson
The universal facial attractiveness (UFA) hypothesis proposes that some facial features are universally preferred because they are reliable signals of mate quality. The primary evidence for this hypothesis comes from cross-cultural studies of perceived attractiveness. However, these studies do not directly address patterns of morphological variation at the population level. An unanswered question is therefore: Are universally preferred facial phenotypes geographically invariant, as the UFA hypothesis implies? The purpose of our study is to evaluate...

Data from: A universal probe set for targeted sequencing of 353 nuclear genes from any flowering plant designed using k-medoids clustering

Matthew G. Johnson, Lisa Pokorny, Steven Dodsworth, Laura R. Botigue, Robyn S. Cowan, Alison Devault, Wolf L. Eiserhardt, Niroshini Epitawalage, Félix Forest, Jan T. Kim, James Leebens-Mack, Ilia J. Leitch, Olivier Maurin, Doug Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, William J. Baker & Norman Wickett
Sequencing of target-enriched libraries is an efficient and cost-effective method for obtaining DNA sequence data from hundreds of nuclear loci for phylogeny reconstruction. Much of the cost of developing targeted sequencing approaches is associated with the generation of preliminary data needed for the identification of orthologous loci for probe design. In plants, identifying orthologous loci has proven difficult due to a large number of whole-genome duplication events, especially in the angiosperms (flowering plants). We used...

Data from: Handicap principle implies emergence of dimorphic ornaments

Sara M. Clifton, Rosemary I. Braun & Daniel M. Abrams
Species spanning the animal kingdom have evolved extravagant and costly ornaments to attract mating partners. Zahavi's handicap principle offers an elegant explanation for this: ornaments signal individual quality, and must be costly to ensure honest signalling, making mate selection more efficient. Here, we incorporate the assumptions of the handicap principle into a mathematical model and show that they are sufficient to explain the heretofore puzzling observation of bimodally distributed ornament sizes in a variety of...

Data from: Genetics of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a Ghanaian population

Marquitta J. White, Nuri M. Kodaman, Reed H. Harder, Folkert W. Asselbergs, Douglas E. Vaughan, Nancy J. Brown, Jason H. Moore & Scott M. Williams
Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a major modulator of the fibrinolytic system, is an important factor in cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and severity. PAI-1 is highly heritable, but the few genes associated with it explain only a small portion of its variation. Studies of PAI-1 typically employ linear regression to estimate the effects of genetic variants on PAI-1 levels, but PAI-1 is not normally distributed, even after transformation. Therefore, alternative statistical methods may provide greater...

Data from: Set1/COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional memory

Agustina D'Urso, Yoh-Hei Takahashi, Bin Xiong, Jessica Marone, Robert Coukos, Carlo Randise-Hinchliff, Ji-Ping Wang, Ali Shilatifard & Jason H. Brickner
In yeast and humans, previous experiences can lead to epigenetic transcriptional memory: repressed genes that exhibit mitotically heritable changes in chromatin structure and promoter recruitment of poised RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex (RNAPII PIC), which enhances future reactivation. Here, we show that INO1 memory in yeast is initiated by binding of the Sfl1 transcription factor to the cis-acting Memory Recruitment Sequence, targeting INO1 to the nuclear periphery. Memory requires a remodeled form of the Set1/COMPASS...

Data from: Dietary specialization in mutualistic acacia-ants affects relative abundance but not identity of host-associated bacteria

Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Stefanie Kautz, Brian D. Wray & Corrie S. Moreau
Acacia-ant mutualists in the genus Pseudomyrmex nest obligately in acacia plants and, as we show through stable isotope analysis, feed at a remarkably low trophic level. Insects with diets such as these sometimes depend on bacterial symbionts for nutritional enrichment. We, therefore, examine the bacterial communities associated with acacia-ants in order to determine whether they host bacterial partners likely to contribute to their nutrition. Despite large differences in trophic position, acacia-ants and related species with...

Data from: Defining the alloreactive T cell repertoire using high-throughput sequencing of mixed lymphocyte reaction culture

Ryan O. Emerson, James M. Mathew, Iwona M. Konieczna, Harlan S. Robins & Joseph R. Leventhal
The cellular immune response is the most important mediator of allograft rejection and is a major barrier to transplant tolerance. Delineation of the depth and breadth of the alloreactive T cell repertoire and subsequent application of the technology to the clinic may improve patient outcomes. As a first step toward this, we have used MLR and high-throughput sequencing to characterize the alloreactive T cell repertoire in healthy adults at baseline and 3 months later. Our...

Data from: Quantitative analysis of long-form aromatase mRNA in the male and female rat brain

Nino Tabatadze, Satoru M. Sato & Catherine S. Woolley
In vitro studies show that estrogens acutely modulate synaptic function in both sexes. These acute effects may be mediated in vivo by estrogens synthesized within the brain, which could fluctuate more rapidly than circulating estrogens. For this to be the case, brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens should be capable of synthesizing them. To investigate this question, we used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of mRNA for the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, aromatase, in different...

Data from: The Red Death meets the abdominal bristle: polygenic mutation for susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen in Caenorhabditis elegans

Veronique Etienne, Erik C. Andersen, José Miguel Ponciano, Dustin Blanton, Analucia Cadavid, Joanna Joyner-Matos, Chikako Matsuba, Brandon Tabman & Charles F. Baer
Understanding the genetic basis of susceptibility to pathogens is an important goal of medicine and of evolutionary biology. A key first step toward understanding the genetics and evolution of any phenotypic trait is characterizing the role of mutation. However, the rate at which mutation introduces genetic variance for pathogen susceptibility in any organism is essentially unknown. Here we quantify the per-generation input of genetic variance by mutation (VM) for susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to the...

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