4 Works

Data from: Set1/COMPASS and Mediator are repurposed to promote epigenetic transcriptional memory

Agustina D'Urso, Yoh-Hei Takahashi, Bin Xiong, Jessica Marone, Robert Coukos, Carlo Randise-Hinchliff, Ji-Ping Wang, Ali Shilatifard & Jason H. Brickner
In yeast and humans, previous experiences can lead to epigenetic transcriptional memory: repressed genes that exhibit mitotically heritable changes in chromatin structure and promoter recruitment of poised RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex (RNAPII PIC), which enhances future reactivation. Here, we show that INO1 memory in yeast is initiated by binding of the Sfl1 transcription factor to the cis-acting Memory Recruitment Sequence, targeting INO1 to the nuclear periphery. Memory requires a remodeled form of the Set1/COMPASS...

Data from: Handicap principle implies emergence of dimorphic ornaments

Sara M. Clifton, Rosemary I. Braun & Daniel M. Abrams
Species spanning the animal kingdom have evolved extravagant and costly ornaments to attract mating partners. Zahavi's handicap principle offers an elegant explanation for this: ornaments signal individual quality, and must be costly to ensure honest signalling, making mate selection more efficient. Here, we incorporate the assumptions of the handicap principle into a mathematical model and show that they are sufficient to explain the heretofore puzzling observation of bimodally distributed ornament sizes in a variety of...

Data from: Are categorical spatial relations encoded by shifting visual attention between objects?

Lei Yuan, David Uttal & Steven Franconeri
Perceiving not just values, but relations between values, is critical to human cognition. We tested the predictions of a proposed mechanism for processing categorical spatial relations between two objects—the shift account of relation processing—which states that relations such as ‘above’ or ‘below’ are extracted by shifting visual attention upward or downward in space. If so, then shifts of attention should improve the representation of spatial relations, compared to a control condition of identity memory. Participants...

Data from: Mutation is a sufficient and robust predictor of genetic variation for mitotic spindle traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

Reza Farhadifar, Jose Miguel Ponciano, Erik C. Andersen, Daniel J. Needleman & Charles F. Baer
Different types of phenotypic traits consistently exhibit different levels of genetic variation in natural populations. There are two potential explanations: either mutation produces genetic variation at different rates, or natural selection removes or promotes genetic variation at different rates. Whether mutation or selection is of greater general importance is a longstanding unresolved question in evolutionary genetics. We report mutational variances (VM) for 19 traits related to the first mitotic cell division in C. elegans, and...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Northwestern University
    4
  • University of Florida
    1
  • Harvard University
    1