3 Works

Data from: Starting a DNA barcode reference library for shallow water polychaetes from the southern European Atlantic coast

Jorge Lobo, Marcos A. L. Teixeira, Luisa M. S. Borges, Maria S. G. Ferreira, Claudia Hollatz, Pedro T. Gomes, Ronaldo Sousa, Ascensão Ravara, Maria H. Costa & Filipe O. Costa
Annelid polychaetes have been seldom the focus of dedicated DNA barcoding studies, despite their ecological relevance and often dominance, particularly in soft-bottom estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we report the first assessment of the performance of DNA barcodes in the discrimination of shallow water polychaete species from the southern European Atlantic coast, focusing on specimens collected in estuaries and coastal ecosystems of Portugal. We analysed cytochrome oxidase I DNA barcodes (COI-5P) from 164 specimens,...

Data from: Structure and functioning of intertidal food webs along an avian flyway: a comparative approach using stable isotopes

Teresa Catry, Pedro M. Lourenço, Ricardo J. Lopes, Camilo Carneiro, José A. Alves, Joana Costa, Hamid Rguibi-Idrissi, Stuart Bearhop, Theunis Piersma & José P. Granadeiro
Food webs and trophic dynamics of coastal systems have been the focus of intense research throughout the world, as they prove to be critical in understanding ecosystem processes and functions. However, very few studies have undertaken a quantitative comparison of entire food webs from a key consumer perspective across a broad geographical area, limiting relevant comparisons among systems with distinct biotic and abiotic components. We investigate the structure and functioning of food webs in four...

Data from: Bayesian hierarchical models suggest oldest known plant-visiting bat was omnivorous

Laurel R. Yohe, Paúl M. Velazco, Danny Rojas, Beth E. Gerstner, Nancy B. Simmons & Liliana M. Dávalos
The earliest record of plant visiting in bats dates to the Middle Miocene of La Venta, the world's most diverse tropical palaeocommunity. Palynephyllum antimaster is known from molars that indicate nectarivory. Skull length, an important indicator of key traits such as body size, bite force and trophic specialization, remains unknown. We developed Bayesian models to infer skull length based on dental measurements. These models account for variation within and between species, variation between clades, and...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Aveiro
    3
  • University of Porto
    2
  • City College of New York
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • University of Iceland
    1
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    1
  • Universidade Nova de Lisboa
    1
  • University of Minho
    1
  • American Museum of Natural History
    1