3 Works

Data from: Inference of facultative mobility in the enigmatic Ediacaran organism Parvancorina

Simon A.F. Darroch, Imran A. Rahman, Brandt Gibson, Rachel A. Racicot, Marc Laflamme & Simon A. F. Darroch
Establishing how Ediacaran organisms moved and fed is critical to deciphering their ecological and evolutionary significance, but has long been confounded by their non-analogue body plans. Here, we use computational fluid dynamics to quantitatively analyze water flow around the Ediacaran taxon Parvancorina, thereby testing between competing models for feeding mode and mobility. The results show that flow was not distributed evenly across the organism, but was directed towards localized areas; this allows us to reject...

Data from: Sauropod tooth morphotypes from the Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin (Portugal)

Pedro Mocho, Rafael Royo-Torres, Elisabete Malafaia, Fernando Escaso & Francisco Ortega
The Upper Jurassic of the Lusitanian Basin has yielded an important fossil record of sauropods, but little information is available about the tooth morphotypes represented in this region. A large sample of teeth, both unpublished and published, is described and discussed here. Four main tooth morphologies are identified: spatulate, heart-shaped, pencil-shaped, and compressed cone-chisel-shaped. Heart-shaped teeth are considered to be exclusive to a non-neosauropod eusauropod, tentatively referred to Turiasauria. The spatulate teeth can be attributed...

Data from: Anthropogenic extinction dominates Holocene declines of West Indian mammals

Siobhán B. Cooke, Liliana M. Dávalos, Alexis M. Mychajliw, Samuel T. Turvey & Nathan S. Upham
The extensive postglacial mammal losses in the West Indies provide an opportunity to evaluate extinction dynamics, but limited data have hindered our ability to test hypotheses. Here, we analyze the tempo and dynamics of extinction using a novel data set of faunal last-appearance dates and human first-appearance dates, demonstrating widespread overlap between humans and now-extinct native mammals. Humans arrived in four waves (Lithic, Archaic, Ceramic, and European), each associated with increased environmental impact. Large-bodied mammals...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    3
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • National University of Distance Education
    1
  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
    1
  • Vanderbilt University
    1
  • University of Toronto
    1
  • Zoological Society of London
    1
  • Yale University
    1
  • Oxford University Museum of Natural History
    1